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Jason 2012: Pediatric Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Firestormm, Oct 20, 2012.

  1. Firestormm

    Firestormm Senior Member

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    Reviews in Health Care: Full paper: http://ojs-seed.neagen.it/index.php/rhc/article/view/280/html

    Corresponding author

    Leonard A. Jason, Ph.D. Director, Center for Community Research, DePaul University, 990 W. Fullerton Ave., Chicago, IL 60614

    I have yet to read it all thoroughly, though I generally look out for things from Jason, and I don't think kids receive much in the way of special focus - so this review looked appealing.

    Especially liked the following - which is about as far as I have got thus far:

    Edit: Y'all will LOVE the bit on CBT (well in part I suppose)...
    Dolphin likes this.
  2. Firestormm

    Firestormm Senior Member

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    Gonna post some extracts that caught my eye as I read through it - having had a rough night I need a distraction. Bear with me folks :)

    Ok. So now we enter the realm's of CBT etc. I guess that this first extract will be something most likely to be repeated, although to be honest I found the above cortisol explanation etc. very interesting, and the notion that CBT and other strategies could help to stabilise cortisol dysfunction (my word and understanding - please correct where necessary), is something new to me.

    I have to repeat that I do like these reviews and the way in which Jason reviews (or tries to) all the evidence, is credible in my own tiny mind.

    Viz:

    Anyway, this was what I found of interest to me personally, as I had not heard of it before:

    So. A possible biological reaction, a stabilisation, of cortisol from a 'CBT' intervention. Buggar-me! Who would have thought. Joking aside, I had not heard it analysed like that before. Or that cortisol potentially contributed to some aspects of potentially my own symptoms. Funny that. Probably the old memory cell misfiring again. Or maybe I'm simply too thick these days :)
  3. Firestormm

    Firestormm Senior Member

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    Now I do wonder how much that contribution from Wessely will be re-posted... Still, I have to say that I was ignorant of the view in relation to Prognosis for younger people. I had understood it to be better than for adults over the longer term. Just goes to show...!!

    Night all :)
  4. Firestormm

    Firestormm Senior Member

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  5. SilverbladeTE

    SilverbladeTE Senior Member

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    Somewhere near Glasgow, Scotland
    A doc who refused a MS patient treatments except CBT, and then that CBT not for coping with distress, but as a "cure/treatment" would soon be out on his ass and maybe worse.

    *SAME DAMN THING*

    You can see the Weasels "weaselling" their way into "get out of jail clauses" with all this stuff as I've been saying for some time.
    "Oh but officer! We did mention HPA!" etc.
    [​IMG]

    anyway the recovery rate stuff is important and notes what many have experienced: damn few folk EVER recover from ME and many of those relapse years on.
    What usually happens is that after some years, usually when you make yourself worse trying to fight it, putting up with bullshit or harmful treatment, you eventually figure out a better coping strategy for *yourself*
    ie, all most docs are any damn use for with this illness is for PAINKILLERS, and that is one damnably digusting expose' of the reality of this, sigh.
    Screw the CBT zealots, they are slowly admitting what many of us figured out for ourselves years ago: Pacing/managing stress etc.
  6. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    There was also another paper by a very similar team:

    It's perhaps a bit like the claims that CBT can be useful for pain; except
    Firestormm likes this.
  7. Sparrow

    Sparrow Senior Member

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    As far as I can see, they're saying that prescription drugs don't tend to help consistently with this illness, but that lifestyle-type things can also influence hormones (when you sleep, what you eat, what you do, how much stress you're under, etc.). So they're saying if drugs don't seem to be doing the trick, it might be worth a try to affect them with those other things too.


    For what it's worth, I don't mind what was said here. It seems like this guy is on our side. From what I read (and I will admit that I skimmed large sections), they seem to be acknowledging us as a debilitating and physical illness, critiquing GET and "false illness beliefs" CBT, and providing a plausible explanation for why CBT seems to have occasionally helped certain people a little. And they've been great about explicitly saying that we need to combine any lifestyle changes with other kinds of treatment (just like they do for cancer, etc.).

    Lots of autoimmune conditions are made worse by stress. That doesn't mean that stress-reduction is the only treatment that should be given, but it also doesn't mean that it can't have an impact.
    taniaaust1 and Firestormm like this.

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