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Is it a new disease or its CFS ?

Discussion in 'Immunological' started by Omar88, Aug 26, 2012.

  1. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    I'd forget about HIV if I were you; I know it is a celebrity among viruses, but having a "one track mind" of always thinking about HIV may make you miss the opportunity of identifying the pathogen you actually have, and what treatments you might then get for it.

    That is why is is a good idea to write the name as the Chinese "HIV-like" virus, with the quotation marks shown, in order to make the point that all the research performed in China demonstrate that the Chinese virus is not a mutated HIV strain, and has nothing to do with HIV.

    Teedot, did you see my earlier questions about (1) oxymatrine, and (2) whether you have the Chinese virus, or my virus?
  2. 8eraser8

    8eraser8

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    Totally agree with u

    Do you think your life is important to the goverment or its only important for the ones who love u? Thats the reason why I think gov just do not care.

    If this virus truely is like HIV, the initial symptoms will b the worst. People may go through an asymptomatic phase, it will eventually come back when the immune system becomes weak. :([/quote]
  3. Survivor84

    Survivor84 Senior Member

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    Hip, i hear what you are saying and to be honest I shouldnt focus on that but I also think that if it were related to HIV that the chinese government would not tell those people. That government not listening to there people is why so many of us are were we are today. I do believe that I have what those people have, I have never transmitted mine casually though. I have not tried any treatments as of yet. I have always been hesitant to take anything unless I know what it is for and how it will effect me. Thank you, I am just scared and tired
  4. 8eraser8

    8eraser8

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    Hi teedot
    The idea to go to the media is very good, u should not be alone in this, unfortunately i am overseas and not in the usa. Best thing is get some drs who can support u and other patients in this to testify to media, can start small, or use internet to get this stuff starting,
  5. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    There is big difference between the Chinese government, and the Chinese researchers and their research institutes.

    The Chinese government are trying to play down this whole story, and saying that the virus is not real; but all the Chinese researchers (the virologists and microbiologists) are saying that this Chinese "HIV-like" virus is real, and they have been researching it.


    If you still have anxiety symptoms that are physically triggered and caused by the virus your caught, try the anti-anxiety supplements that I recommend.
    Omar88 likes this.
  6. Survivor84

    Survivor84 Senior Member

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    Ok thank you hip, if you know anybody from the US with this, let me know. I emailed mcwpa. an organization that supports CFS pts. Google them
  7. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    Teedot, you still did not answer my question about whether you think your symptoms are like the Chinese "HIV-like" virus symptoms (listed here), or whether your symptoms are more like those from the virus I caught (listed here).
  8. Survivor84

    Survivor84 Senior Member

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    Hip, more like the hiv like virus, my muscles are always jumping, popping joints(i have always had). Although i do not have a white tounge.ulcers in the beginning, depression given in this situation, its like second nature, naturally anybody worried about hiv has comtenplated suicide. I have vision issues at times, cognitively, not as sharp and i notice i slur my speech more now a days, also at times have excess saliva,eww..lol. I am not a strong as i used to be and i shake more, my nerves had weakend. I have been forgetting things more easily. But i barely ever get sick at this point, I had one uti, and conjunctivitis in both eyes ( first time ever) and back spasms in the last five years. in the begginning i was b12 deficient and low grade fevers. i havent had a good exam for about 3-4 years now. 2months ago CBC
    WBC 11000
    ALC 1.5, at 16%
    neutrophils elevated, not real skin issues,although my skin has always been sensitive. My boyfriend I noticed has been losing weight lately, which is scaring me
  9. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    The virus I caught also caused a lot of depression symptoms, as well as anhedonia symptoms (anhedonia is the loss of the pleasure you would normally when do something you like), emotional flatness, and lots of suicidal ideation. Suicidal ideation is very common in people once they get anhedonia symptoms. Anhedonia seems to make people have suicidal thoughts. I am a lot better now (thanks to various medications), but I went through about 5 years of hell with all those horrible mental symptoms and thoughts.

    But the important thing to appreciate, Teedot, is that this bad mental state is not just due to the worries about having a virus; this bad mental state is actually triggered by the affect that the virus has on the brain. It is important to realize that. You are not yourself, because the infection has a bad impact directly on the brain, and so you get mental symptoms like depressions, and so forth.

    If you want any advice about what supplements or drugs to take to improve these nasty mental symptoms, just ask, and I'll give you some suggestions about the medications that worked very well for me.
  10. Survivor84

    Survivor84 Senior Member

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  11. urraco2012

    urraco2012

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    U see, thats why Im sure this is produced by a precondition that we had and allow some kind of infection or affection... whatever... I just want to know how you guys control the sleepiness, dont allow me to work!
  12. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    Most of the stuff I take are herbs and supplements, rather than pharmaceutical drugs, so perhaps that might make you feel more at ease. For the anxiety symptoms, for example, flaxseed oil and the dietary supplement N-acetylglucosamine worked very well.
  13. Omar88

    Omar88 Senior Member

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    If this virus truely is like HIV, the initial symptoms will b the worst. People may go through an asymptomatic phase, it will eventually come back when the immune system becomes weak. :([/quote]

    We will never know what will happen in few years ! we might get better and get over it and might not ,,,

    I have all the HIV Chinese virus symptoms they mentioned and the other ones in the web site beside the girl was a Chinese prostitute that just came from China in when I fucking did my mistake,,,,,

    I would say that its one of two theories here :

    1) same virus with different symptoms
    2) Different viruses

    If we will die from this, something in our bodies should stop working and we will know what part is it when that happen but up to now most of our tests doesn't indicate that this will happen so what i think this is, is a chronic infection that will make us suffer while we are living and hopefully we will manage something either by finding it or having a treatment that will get rid of it without knowing what was it in the next few years as some antivirals are under develop.
  14. Survivor84

    Survivor84 Senior Member

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    I would say that its one of two theories here :

    1) same virus with different symptoms
    2) Different viruses

    If we will die from this, something in our bodies should stop working and we will know what part is it when that happen but up to now most of our tests doesn't indicate that this will happen so what i think this is, is a chronic infection that will make us suffer while we are living and hopefully we will manage something either by finding it or having a treatment that will get rid of it without knowing what was it in the next few years as some antivirals are under develop.[/quote]

    Omar, I think it may be one particular virus that is causing a old or new viruses to be created/recreated, because it is going on treated and unrecognized, it may be able to mutate easier and or link with other viruses. I also think its possible that those prostitues intentionally tampered with the condoms, which is why so many have been effected through protected sex. Just a guess
  15. 8eraser8

    8eraser8

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    http://vir.sgmjournals.org/content/early/2012/05/24/vir.0.043182-0.full.pdf

    This will give a good idea about sequencing and viral identification

    Omar, I think it may be one particular virus that is causing a old or new viruses to be created/recreated, because it is going on treated and unrecognized, it may be able to mutate easier and or link with other viruses. I also think its possible that those prostitues intentionally tampered with the condoms, which is why so many have been effected through protected sex. Just a guess[/quote]
  16. 8eraser8

    8eraser8

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    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3233444/

    Very interesting article describing how to identify unknown virus.

    Hip if we can identify these viruses ranking havoc inside us, we can hopefully see which antivirals would work. Its like shooting in the dark night and shooting with night vision googles.


    [/quote]
  17. 8eraser8

    8eraser8

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    We will never know what will happen in few years ! we might get better and get over it and might not ,,,

    I have all the HIV Chinese virus symptoms they mentioned and the other ones in the web site beside the girl was a Chinese prostitute that just came from China in when I fucking did my mistake,,,,,

    I would say that its one of two theories here :

    1) same virus with different symptoms
    2) Different viruses

    If we will die from this, something in our bodies should stop working and we will know what part is it when that happen but up to now most of our tests doesn't indicate that this will happen so what i think this is, is a chronic infection that will make us suffer while we are living and hopefully we will manage something either by finding it or having a treatment that will get rid of it without knowing what was it in the next few years as some antivirals are under develop.[/quote]

    2. Applications of NGS Technologies to Diagnostic Virology

    NGS technologies are currently used for whole genome sequencing, investigation of genome diversity, metagenomics, epigenetics, discovery of non-coding RNAs and protein-binding sites, and gene-expression profiling by RNA sequencing (reviewed in refs. [26]). Typical applications of NGS methods in microbiology and virology, besides high-throughput whole genome sequencing, are discovery of new microorganisms and viruses by using metagenomic approaches, investigation of microbial communities in the environment and in human body niches in healthy and disease conditions, analysis of viral genome variability within the host (i.e., quasispecies), detection of low-abundance antiviral drug-resistance mutations in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or viral hepatitis, as outlined in this review article.
    2.1. Detection of Unknown Viral Pathogens and Discovery of Novel Viruses

    The human population is exposed to an increasing burden of infectious diseases caused by the emergence of new previously unrecognized viruses. Climate changes, globalization, settlements near animal and livestock habitats, and the increased number of immunocompromised people probably contribute to the emergence and spread of new infections [7]. In addition, several clinical syndromes are suspected to be of viral etiology, but the causing agent cannot be isolated and recognized by traditional culture and molecular methods. Thus, there is the need to improve methods for the identification of unsuspected viral pathogens or new viruses. Subtractive techniques, such as representational difference analysis or random sequencing of plasmid libraries of nuclease resistant fragments of viral genomes, have led in the past to the discovery of several viruses, including human herpesvirus type 8 [8], human GB virus [9], Torque Teno Virus [10], bocavirus [11], human parvovirus 4 [12], WU polyomavirus [13] and KI polyomavirus [14]. These techniques are poorly sensitive and time-consuming, and thus are unsuitable for large scale analysis. For these purposes, NGS-based methods have been developed. However, traditional cloning and sequencing methods can be relatively simple and sensitive for the discovery of new viruses when used for the analysis of otherwise sterile samples, and may represent an alternative to NGS. One of these methods is termed VIDISCA (Virus Discovery cDNA Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis) and may be applied to sterile specimens, such as cell culture supernatants [15]. In this method, samples are ultracentrifuged for viral particle enrichment and treated by DNase and RNase to digest away cellular nucleic acids. Capsid-protected viral nucleic acids are then purified, converted to double stranded DNA, digested with restriction enzymes and ligated to oligonucleotide adaptors, which are used as primer binding sites for comparative PCR [15]. This method was described originally in the context of the discovery of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in 2004 [16]. Microarray-based diagnostic assays have also been used to characterize previously unknown viruses, such as SARS-CoVs [17], but require information on the genome of the virus or closely related viruses that are under investigation [18].
    High throughput NGS techniques represent a powerful tool which can be applied to metagenomics-based strategies for the detection of unknown disease-associated viruses and for the discovery of novel human viruses [19,20]. Compared with microarray-based assays, NGS methods offer the advantage of higher sensitivity and the potential to detect the full spectrum of viruses, including unknown and unexpected viruses.
    One of the first applications of NGS for pathogen discovery was the investigation of three patients who died of a febrile illness a few weeks after transplantation of solid organs from a single donor and for whom conventional microbiological and molecular tests, as well as microarray analysis for a wide range of infectious agents, had not been informative [21]. In this study, RNA was purified from blood, cerebrospinal fluid and tissue specimens from transplant recipients and, after digestion with DNase to eliminate human DNA, RNA was reverse-transcribed and amplified with random primers. Amplification products were pooled and sequenced with the use of the 454 pyrosequencing platform. After subtraction of sequences of vertebrates and highly repetitive sequences, contiguous sequences were assembled and compared with motifs represented in databases of microbes, leading to the identification of putative protein sequences which were consistent with an Old World arenavirus. Additional sequence analysis showed that it was a new arenavirus related to lymphocytic choriomeningitis viruses. Further serological and immunohistochemical analyses documented that the virus was transmitted through organ transplantation [21].
    A similar strategy, based on unbiased high-throughput sequencing using 454 pyrosequencing for the direct diagnosis of viral infections in clinical specimens, has been used in different diagnostic settings, such as the investigation of patients during seasonal influenza and norovirus outbreaks [22], the identification of an astrovirus as a causative agent for encephalitis in a boy with agammaglobulinemia, after conventional methods had failed to identify an infectious agent [23], and the identification of a hemorrhagic fever-associated arenavirus from South Africa (Lujo virus) [24].
    When implemented into virus-discovery methods based on shotgun sequencing, next-generation technologies greatly enhance turnaround time and sensitivity. For example, the 454 system was implemented into a virus discovery assay based on an improved version of the VIDISCA protocol to minimize rRNA contamination [25]. Likewise, the association of NGS techniques with rolling circle amplification (RCA), another method for virus discovery, could greatly increase its performance. RCA employs the PhiX29 polymerase to selectively amplify small double stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules and is used to amplify circular genomes of DNA viruses and bacteria plasmids [26]. Recently, RCA led to the identification and whole genome sequencing of novel human papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses [27], including human polyomaviruses 6 and 7 (HPyV6 and HPyV7), detected in cutaneous swab specimens of healthy persons [28], and trichodysplasia spinulosa–associated polyomavirus (TSPyV), detected in skin lesions from immunocompromised patients [29].
    Besides 454 pyrosequencing, short-read-based metagenomic methods using the Illumina GA platform have also been used to detect unknown viruses in clinical specimens. The Illumina GA platform allowed to identify influenza A viruses from swab specimens and de novo assembly of its genome [3032]. It also led to the detection of viral pathogens in nasopharyngeal aspirate samples from patients with acute lower respiratory tract infections [33], such as a new enterovirus, named enterovirus 109 (EV109) detected in a cohort of Nicaraguan children with viral respiratory illness [34].
    A comparative study of the analytical sensitivity of the two platforms, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina GA, for the detection of viruses in biological samples was done on a set of samples which were artificially spiked with eleven different viruses [35]. The Illumina method had a much greater sensitivity than 454, approaching that of optimized quantitative real-time PCR. However, at low viral concentration in the specimen, the number of reads generated by the Illumina platform was too small for de novo assembly of viral genome sequences [35].
    Vector-borne viruses and zoonotic viruses represent another important and challenging field for viral discovery. The feasibility of detecting arthropod-borne viruses was explored in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes experimentally infected with dengue virus and pooled with noninfected mosquitoes to simulate samples derived from ongoing arbovirus surveillance programs [36]. Total RNA was purified from mosquito pools, reverse-transcribed using random primers and subjected to 454 pyrosequencing, which led to the correct identification of infected mosquito pools [36].
    Another interesting strategy to discover arthropod-borne viruses exploits the property of invertebrates to respond to infection by processing viral RNA genomes into siRNAs of discrete sizes. A recent study on small RNA libraries sequenced by NGS platforms [37] showed that viral small silencing RNAs produced by invertebrate animals are overlapping in sequence and can assemble into long contiguous fragments of the invading viral genome. Based on this finding, an approach of virus discovery in invertebrates by deep sequencing and assembly of total small RNAs was developed and applied to the analysis of contigs (i.e., a contiguous length of genomic sequences in which the order of bases is known to a high confidence level) assembled from published small RNA libraries. Five previously undescribed viruses from cultured Drosophila cells and adult mosquitoes were discovered, including three with a positive-strand RNA genome and two with a dsRNA genome [37]. This strategy for virus discovery based on deep sequencing of small RNAs has been also successfully used in plant virology [38].
  18. 8eraser8

    8eraser8

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    Hello, I am sorry for what is happening to u, I experienced the same, If you are still in the acute phase, do get the acute phase blood drawn from you and keep it freezed, let me know, there is a chance we can use acute phase blood to identify novel viruses using next generation sequencing
  19. 8eraser8

    8eraser8

    Messages:
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    2. Applications of NGS Technologies to Diagnostic Virology

    NGS technologies are currently used for whole genome sequencing, investigation of genome diversity, metagenomics, epigenetics, discovery of non-coding RNAs and protein-binding sites, and gene-expression profiling by RNA sequencing (reviewed in refs. [26]). Typical applications of NGS methods in microbiology and virology, besides high-throughput whole genome sequencing, are discovery of new microorganisms and viruses by using metagenomic approaches, investigation of microbial communities in the environment and in human body niches in healthy and disease conditions, analysis of viral genome variability within the host (i.e., quasispecies), detection of low-abundance antiviral drug-resistance mutations in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or viral hepatitis, as outlined in this review article.
    2.1. Detection of Unknown Viral Pathogens and Discovery of Novel Viruses

    The human population is exposed to an increasing burden of infectious diseases caused by the emergence of new previously unrecognized viruses. Climate changes, globalization, settlements near animal and livestock habitats, and the increased number of immunocompromised people probably contribute to the emergence and spread of new infections [7]. In addition, several clinical syndromes are suspected to be of viral etiology, but the causing agent cannot be isolated and recognized by traditional culture and molecular methods. Thus, there is the need to improve methods for the identification of unsuspected viral pathogens or new viruses. Subtractive techniques, such as representational difference analysis or random sequencing of plasmid libraries of nuclease resistant fragments of viral genomes, have led in the past to the discovery of several viruses, including human herpesvirus type 8 [8], human GB virus [9], Torque Teno Virus [10], bocavirus [11], human parvovirus 4 [12], WU polyomavirus [13] and KI polyomavirus [14]. These techniques are poorly sensitive and time-consuming, and thus are unsuitable for large scale analysis. For these purposes, NGS-based methods have been developed. However, traditional cloning and sequencing methods can be relatively simple and sensitive for the discovery of new viruses when used for the analysis of otherwise sterile samples, and may represent an alternative to NGS.



    One of these methods is termed VIDISCA (Virus Discovery cDNA Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis) and may be applied to sterile specimens, such as cell culture supernatants [15]. In this method, samples are ultracentrifuged for viral particle enrichment and treated by DNase and RNase to digest away cellular nucleic acids. Capsid-protected viral nucleic acids are then purified, converted to double stranded DNA, digested with restriction enzymes and ligated to oligonucleotide adaptors, which are used as primer binding sites for comparative PCR [15]. This method was described originally in the context of the discovery of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in 2004 [16]. Microarray-based diagnostic assays have also been used to characterize previously unknown viruses, such as SARS-CoVs [17], but require information on the genome of the virus or closely related viruses that are under investigation [18].
    High throughput NGS techniques represent a powerful tool which can be applied to metagenomics-based strategies for the detection of unknown disease-associated viruses and for the discovery of novel human viruses [19,20]. Compared with microarray-based assays, NGS methods offer the advantage of higher sensitivity and the potential to detect the full spectrum of viruses, including unknown and unexpected viruses.
    One of the first applications of NGS for pathogen discovery was the investigation of three patients who died of a febrile illness a few weeks after transplantation of solid organs from a single donor and for whom conventional microbiological and molecular tests, as well as microarray analysis for a wide range of infectious agents, had not been informative [21]. In this study, RNA was purified from blood, cerebrospinal fluid and tissue specimens from transplant recipients and, after digestion with DNase to eliminate human DNA, RNA was reverse-transcribed and amplified with random primers. Amplification products were pooled and sequenced with the use of the 454 pyrosequencing platform. After subtraction of sequences of vertebrates and highly repetitive sequences, contiguous sequences were assembled and compared with motifs represented in databases of microbes, leading to the identification of putative protein sequences which were consistent with an Old World arenavirus. Additional sequence analysis showed that it was a new arenavirus related to lymphocytic choriomeningitis viruses. Further serological and immunohistochemical analyses documented that the virus was transmitted through organ transplantation [21].
    A similar strategy, based on unbiased high-throughput sequencing using 454 pyrosequencing for the direct diagnosis of viral infections in clinical specimens, has been used in different diagnostic settings, such as the investigation of patients during seasonal influenza and norovirus outbreaks [22], the identification of an astrovirus as a causative agent for encephalitis in a boy with agammaglobulinemia, after conventional methods had failed to identify an infectious agent [23], and the identification of a hemorrhagic fever-associated arenavirus from South Africa (Lujo virus) [24].
    When implemented into virus-discovery methods based on shotgun sequencing, next-generation technologies greatly enhance turnaround time and sensitivity. For example, the 454 system was implemented into a virus discovery assay based on an improved version of the VIDISCA protocol to minimize rRNA contamination [25]. Likewise, the association of NGS techniques with rolling circle amplification (RCA), another method for virus discovery, could greatly increase its performance. RCA employs the PhiX29 polymerase to selectively amplify small double stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules and is used to amplify circular genomes of DNA viruses and bacteria plasmids [26]. Recently, RCA led to the identification and whole genome sequencing of novel human papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses [27], including human polyomaviruses 6 and 7 (HPyV6 and HPyV7), detected in cutaneous swab specimens of healthy persons [28], and trichodysplasia spinulosa–associated polyomavirus (TSPyV), detected in skin lesions from immunocompromised patients [29].
    Besides 454 pyrosequencing, short-read-based metagenomic methods using the Illumina GA platform have also been used to detect unknown viruses in clinical specimens. The Illumina GA platform allowed to identify influenza A viruses from swab specimens and de novo assembly of its genome [3032]. It also led to the detection of viral pathogens in nasopharyngeal aspirate samples from patients with acute lower respiratory tract infections [33], such as a new enterovirus, named enterovirus 109 (EV109) detected in a cohort of Nicaraguan children with viral respiratory illness [34].
    A comparative study of the analytical sensitivity of the two platforms, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina GA, for the detection of viruses in biological samples was done on a set of samples which were artificially spiked with eleven different viruses [35]. The Illumina method had a much greater sensitivity than 454, approaching that of optimized quantitative real-time PCR. However, at low viral concentration in the specimen, the number of reads generated by the Illumina platform was too small for de novo assembly of viral genome sequences [35].
    Vector-borne viruses and zoonotic viruses represent another important and challenging field for viral discovery. The feasibility of detecting arthropod-borne viruses was explored in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes experimentally infected with dengue virus and pooled with noninfected mosquitoes to simulate samples derived from ongoing arbovirus surveillance programs [36]. Total RNA was purified from mosquito pools, reverse-transcribed using random primers and subjected to 454 pyrosequencing, which led to the correct identification of infected mosquito pools [36].
    Another interesting strategy to discover arthropod-borne viruses exploits the property of invertebrates to respond to infection by processing viral RNA genomes into siRNAs of discrete sizes. A recent study on small RNA libraries sequenced by NGS platforms [37] showed that viral small silencing RNAs produced by invertebrate animals are overlapping in sequence and can assemble into long contiguous fragments of the invading viral genome. Based on this finding, an approach of virus discovery in invertebrates by deep sequencing and assembly of total small RNAs was developed and applied to the analysis of contigs (i.e., a contiguous length of genomic sequences in which the order of bases is known to a high confidence level) assembled from published small RNA libraries. Five previously undescribed viruses from cultured Drosophila cells and adult mosquitoes were discovered, including three with a positive-strand RNA genome and two with a dsRNA genome [37]. This strategy for virus discovery based on deep sequencing of small RNAs has been also successfully used in plant virology [38].
  20. victore

    victore

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    11
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    Hello 8eraser8
    I am located in Xi'an. Lots of patients did some medicinal test. But all didn't have a accurate reason. Now I am well. Although I have some symptoms, I don't feel uncomfortable. In acute phase, I had rashes. Different people have different symptoms. There is a huge difference. So I don't know how long we can live. But I guess this virus is different from HIV. And this virus is not more serious than HIV. I think we can live longer than HIV sufferers. This is only my GUESS. Some people who infected this virus can automatically get better after 2 or 3 years. But some people become worse. I GUESS this virus don't develop into aids.
    Victore

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