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Is Atrantil the SIBO game changer it claims to be?

Discussion in 'Gastrointestinal and Urinary' started by out2lunch, Sep 11, 2015.

  1. out2lunch

    out2lunch Senior Member

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    My functional med doc tossed this nutraceutical name my way as a possible treatment for my SIBO. Google search turned up a few IBS/SIBO sufferers who are trying it, but no real consensus yet on effectiveness. It apparently just came out this summer.

    I went to their web site to see what was so special about Atrantil, and found an interesting description of how this supplement supposedly works to clean up the small intestine:

    While I've never been enthusiastic about being a guinea pig for new products, this one seems worthy of watching from the sidelines. That being said, I'm a bit reluctant regarding the natural ingredients being used, given my propensity for allergies and weird reactions to common substances.

    While I'm familiar with the first ingredient (peppermint oil) -- which did absolutely nothing for my IBS years ago -- I have no experience with the other two. Quebracho extract has the potential to contain yohimbine, which is a potent alpha blocker that was often used for erectile dysfunction before Viagra hit the market. Conker Tree extract is also known as horse chestnut, has been used for various maladies, such as varicose veins, hemorrhoids, malaria, arthritis, dysentery, and lupus.

    Not exactly sure how the developers determined that quebracho and conker tree extracts work as antibiotics on the methane-producing bacteria, or how they determined the most effective dose to achieve that end. But if Atrantil is as good as they claim, this could be a more cost-effective treatment for SIBO than Xifaxan.

    Anyone else heard of Atrantil?
     
    helen1 and leokitten like this.
  2. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    On the website there are two studies mentioned, yet I can't find any on pub med. I used Atrantil in the search box. Are there any other names this nutraceutical goes by?

    I also did not get a result using the Mayo Drug and supplemental data base. Even when I used the individual ingredients.

    Thanks
    Barb
     
  3. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    Last edited: Sep 11, 2015
  4. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

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    It says this on Dr Brown's website:

    "We have both our randomized and open label studies pending publication. Once we receive approval from our society journals to post results, we will link to the publications from Atrantil.com and this blog post will be updated as well."

    Dated middle of July 2015.

    Nothing to lose really as they have a money back guarantee. Those ingredients have been found helpful for a number of people with MECFS. Flavonoids in particular can be helpful with inflammation in general.
     
  5. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    That’s not enough information. Studies need to be cited and it's quite unprofessional if you don't.

    A money back guarantee doesn't really mean anything. It's often used as a sales gimmick. I have no idea if it applies to this website.

    Have there been studies that show Flavonoids for MECFS or inflamation?

    Ah, maybe that's the search term I should use. Thanks!

    Barb
     
    Waverunner likes this.
  6. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

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    If the studies aren't published, how can they be properly cited? It would be unprofessional to cite studies that are yet to be published. Telling people they are in the process of being published is reasonable if they are then published in a reasonable time frame.

    It's a comment to a question on a blog post not a Congressional hearing.

    A money back guarantee means you can return it for a refund. Don't see how that is a gimmick unless they don't honor it for some reason.
     
  7. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    Ah I getcha. I missed that the studies have not been published. Have they been finished?

    In this case, I think that making these claims before they are published, before other scientist have enough information and can critique them, is putting the cart before the horse. Again I think it's a bit dodgy to do this.

    But maybe the studies will turn out to be solid scientific evidence.

    I guess time will tell.

    Barb
     
  8. South

    South Senior Member

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    I tried looking up the second two ingredients and couldn't find even one bit of support for these claims (other than horse chestnut being a natural antibacterial, but millions of other herbs and foods are also antibacterial and haven't made any difference to my gut.

    And it's suspicious when a manufacturer purposely uses the least common name for their herbal ingredients, instead of simply saying "horse chestnut". They may be trying to make their product seem more unique than it really is.

    Sorry to be so suspicious of it.
     
  9. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    Don't be. With the way we've been treated,, the way studies have been interpreted to not benefit or even harmful to us, I think it's important to gather as much information as possible.

    This goes for allopathic as well as alternative medicine. Also for other issues pertaining to the me/cfs community.

    Knowledge is power. It helps us make decisions, even if we come to different conclusions.

    I think this is what @out2lunch wanted but that's my interpretation. Sometimes I think I should have been a reference librarian as I love to look up things. When I have the energy/nonfoggy mind that is!
    Barb
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2015
    South likes this.
  10. South

    South Senior Member

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    More info on what the ingredients in Antrantil are:

    Its label uses latin names instead of common names. Not a nice thing to do. So here's what the three herbs are:

    Peppermint, Horse Chestnut, and a high-tannin herb called Quebracho. A way to substitute a less expensive high-tannin herb is to buy the common herb White Oak Bark in capsules, which is widely available at supplement selling sites and low in price.

    The makers of Atrantil state that the reason for the Quebracho is that it contains tannins. So logically, substituting a more available, less expensive herb high in tannins, one that is widely available for internal use on the market already, should perform similarly.

    And the other two herbs, peppermint and horse chestnut, are widely available for low prices.

    Tannins in White Oak Bark:
    http://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-white-oak.html
     
  11. aimossy

    aimossy Senior Member

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    Last edited: Apr 18, 2016
  12. avreed

    avreed

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    Don't know if this thread is still ongoing. But a few cautions about the herbs in this product. Quebracho contains 7 different alkaloids which may a problem for people with liver issues. It's also highly astringent so may be a problem for those constipated. Some people are highly allergic to horse chestnut. If you have a nut allergies of any kind this could be a serious problem. Peppermint contains a very volatile oil which may also pose problems for those sensitive to VOCs and who have sensitive stomachs. Everyone is unique and may respond differently to combined herbal products. I have found it best to take products individually first to see how I respond to them before taking a combined formula.
     
    ahmo and wonderoushope like this.
  13. Keltag

    Keltag

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    I know this thread has been quiet for awhile, but I've been supplementing atrantil for over a year and have had strong, lingering leaky gut symptoms even with my extremely limited aip, low oxalate, low fodmap diet (basically grass fed beef, lamb, wild caught fish and 4 organic veggies). I recently contacted atrantil regarding the change of capsule formulation from gelatin to veggie cap and was told that "one or more of the ingredients in atrantil does contain maltodextrin as a carrier or fill material." There is no indication of this or any corn ingredients on the label. I am utterly disgusted and frustrated.
     
    keenly likes this.

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