Agents for Change: The 10th Invest in ME International ME Conference, 2015 - Part 1
The 10th Invest in ME International ME Conference (IIMEC10) was held, as usual, in the Lecture Theatre at 1 Birdcage Walk in Westminster on May 29th, 2015.
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Iodine supplementation

Discussion in 'General Treatment' started by newuser22, Jan 1, 2017.

  1. Jigsaw

    Jigsaw Trying to put the pieces together naturally.

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    Selenium is the base for the 5'-deiodinase enzyme that converts T4 to T3, so that's interesting, because in theory selenium should INCREASE T3. I suppose that even if T3 levels are low, RT3 will still show up if not much/ none of that T3 is being picked up.

    Lowering T4 will obv lower T3 production, so that makes sense.


    Which fits in with iodine being a crucial part of the whole methylation nightmare, and I'm beginning to think it could be key as to preventing a lot of the horrible reactions we all seem to get after a few excellent weeks on MB12 supplementation, even with all relevant cofactors.



    ??? Huh??? I have no idea what that sentence means! Did autocorrect kick in? :confused:


    Soil composition is a HUGE part of our modern health problems. It's nutrient deficient and chemical-rich, as well as the things you've observed about our food-chain (and apparently, they replaced iodide with bromide in flour a few decades ago, which won't have helped, and may go some way towards explaining why a lot of people do better off wheat than on. They might not be gluten intolerant (I tested negative for celiac, but have problems eating bread etc) it might be the bromide affecting thyroid function via displacing the iodine.....

    Just thinking.....:nerd:
     
  2. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

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    Sorry I was looking for the source to link here, but my brain closed down for today :bang-head:
    Did you get protease inhibitors? I suspect my gluten intolerance is due to protease inhibition.
     
  3. Jigsaw

    Jigsaw Trying to put the pieces together naturally.

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    Nope, never. I've had problems with wheat an other grains (but not organic brown rice) my whole life,

    That sentence - it was the wording I didn't understand. Still don't!

    Off to sleep now, v early wake-up tomorrow (today, now). I'm not good at sleeping before about 1am at the earliest, but as my other half is getting up at 5am and always does my breakfast for me, I'll have to be awake then too.

    N'nite :sleep:
     
  4. South

    South Senior Member

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    @Jigsaw I don't have any knowledgable doctors here where I live for me to do any testing of adrenals. My symptom lists closely fit adrenal symptoms lists, and I've long suspected it.
     
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  5. Little Bluestem

    Little Bluestem Senescent on the Illinois Prairie ❀❤✿Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ✿❤❀

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    It was in a post that someone else made here and they did not give their source.
     
  6. Jigsaw

    Jigsaw Trying to put the pieces together naturally.

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    Hi everyone,

    Have heard back from the company whose Lugol's Iodine Solution (2%) I bought. They say that theirs IS elemental iodine, so that's good.

    The Lugol's Chart that I was using for reference is correct. It doesn't include the potassium component of potassium iodide, only the iodide part itself, along with the (elemental) iodine.

    So at 2%, a single drop of my Lugol's is 1/20th of a ml, and contains APPROX 1mg (elemental) iodine, plus 3mg of potassium iodide.

    Potassium iodide is approx 75% iodide, so the iodide portion is roughly 2.5mg per single drop. Therefore, my 2% Lugol's is approximately 2.5mg of total iodine/iodide per drop.



    Been doing some research on bromide, bromines, other endocrine-disruptive halides.......Worrying stuff. :jaw-drop:


    The USA are STILL allowing bromine to be used in dough, so a lot of your commercial bakery products have bromide in, which will screw your thyroid up when the bromide displaces the iodine (also in other sites around the body, not limited to thyroid).


    This article by Mercola says bromide was banned in flours etc in the UK in 1990, and in Canada in 1994.


    (Maybe that's why bread was always more problematic for me before then and isn't always such a problem for me now. My childhood had a lot of white bread in it, evil stuff. My reaction to bread etc used to be so strong that I was checked for coeliac disease, where you are allergic to the wheat protein, gluten, but that wasn't the case with me.)

    Apparently, even Brazil banned it recently.


    Also found in plastics, fizzy pop (soda in the US, fizzy pop here in the UK), inside all cars (along with chlorine, another iodine-displacing halide - which begs a huge question about the safety of chlorine used in swimming pools for me - I mean, could swimming regularly at my local pool when I was a kid have been part of the cause of all my health problems? Or even a major cause? Why are professional swimmers and divers like Tom Daly seemingly unaffected? Or are they? Anyone got any prostate, thyroid and breast cancer stats for swimmers or divers? Or swimming coaches?)


    Bromide also in pesticides, some hot-tub water-cleaning treatments (I LOVE hot-tubs, but have only ever been in one probably less than 10 times in my entire life, so I don't think I can blame that - chance would be a fine thing!)



    Potassium bromate is used in some toothpastes and mouthwashes, as an antiseptic and astringent - you know how some mouthwashes make your mouth fill up with saliva several times after you've spat the mouthwash out? - When we were still using mouthwash (we stopped it about 5 years ago), we used to grade them as a "3-spit", a 4-spit", and one in particular was a "5-spit", because it would make both our mouths fill up with saliva repeatedly after we'd spat the mouthwash out, and we'd have to keep going back to the sink to spit the saliva out, too. I'm going to have to check to see if it was bromide that was causing that. I always thought that was the alcohol content. Maybe it wasn't, if bromide is used as an astringent in mouthwashes.



    Anyway, here's the article:

    http://articles.mercola.com/sites/a...nother-poison-hiding-in-your-environment.aspx

    Still researching........
     
  7. Jigsaw

    Jigsaw Trying to put the pieces together naturally.

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    @South

    You're welcome to PM me if you could use some non-pharmaceutical guidance on how you can support your adrenals naturally. :)

    It's pretty difficult to get a hypoadrenalism dx even with good docs. At least, it is in the UK.

    Most of our GPs are at the mercy of whatever the specialist consultant says, because consultants are higher up the medical food chain.

    Consultants here are widely known (with one of two exceptions) to be arrogant and cold. Endocrinologists are amongst the worst of that breed, in my experience.

    The standard tests for low adrenal function, the ACTH test or the short synacthen test, are so powerful that to fail the test by your adrenals not responding would mean you were basically dead already.


    I don't understand why they can't do things clinically, and check for postural hypotension, feeling cold, no ability to withstand stress, weight loss, brown marks in skin creases, salt cravings, etc, etc, instead of relying on a test that is known to be a very insensitive marker.


    One Endo I saw, way back in the 1990's, before I went to work for a private doc who specialised in thyroid and adrenal problems, deemed my adrenals "normal", my thyroid "normal on thyroxine (T4)" without measuring my T3, and said my then very high cholesterol had "nothing whatsoever to do with this patient's thyroid function" .


    In actual fact, every medical or endocrinology book I've ever read ALL say that low thyroid CAUSES high cholesterol. Once my thyroid was treated with T3, my cholesterol came right down, within a couple of weeks.


    No connection, my backside! :smug:


    Anyway. PM me if you want some natural medicine options. I'd be happy to help :)
     
    South likes this.
  8. PatJ

    PatJ Senior Member

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    Another possibility is that some people find they need extra iron and B6 when taking higher doses of iodine, and then the extra fatigue resolves. I think I remember reading that this often starts to happen around 25mg/day.

    When I started taking iodine I would get kidney pain. Salt, and pulsing the iodine dose (taking every other day) helped.

    For weeks after starting iodine I developed large skin rashes on my forearms (left more than right). It was almost like a covering of hard, dead skin but with a coral-like structure to it (sort of porous.) It came off with a lot of dry brushing. This happened again when I increased the dose. Rashes are, apparently, one of signs of bromide etc. being expelled.

    I don't remember where I found this comment, but it might apply to you:
    "In defense of the 'go gluten free' thing, it's not really the gluten that helps some people feel better when they cut it out. By cutting out wheat flour, you severely reduce the amount of folic acid in your diet, which can resolve some of the problems having an MTHFR mutation causes symptomatically."

    Organic sourdough bread shouldn't have added folic acid. It might be worth a try to see if you can tolerate it.
     
  9. jlynx

    jlynx Senior Member

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    @Jigsaw

    The breakouts are frustrating but I'm going to count it on some kind of detox or healing and wait it out. But there are a couple of natural supplements for hormone balancing that I want to try. I also have very oily skin which is a sign of high testosterone. My hormones tested fine before but that was a while ago.

    You're on 100 mcg a day of T3 a day? What form is it in- compounded? And does it help you? My doc only had me on a low dose of 30 mcg compounded SR and I wondered if a higher dose would have made more of a difference, or if it's because of the Iodine deficiency. Because my levels did even out to a correct ratio and then became messed up again (on the same dose.)

    I take J Crows 2% liquid Iodine. I am replacing it with this 5% version, just because it's cheaper.

    That makes sense, it's just frustrating after having an initial boost from it. But I have read that this is how it goes for a lot of people. Better, worse, than better again.

    I was impatient and didn't start the salt right away so that may be why I'm having some issues. The store only had crappy refined salt so I had to order it online. I use pretty pink Himalayan salt. :redface: Still getting used to the taste and finding tolerable ways of adding it to stuff. How would you say it's made a difference?

    That was a quote by Dr. Abraham in the Guide to Supplementing Iodine:

    Dr. Abraham has stated that it should take 6 months of 50 mgs to reach 90% saturation. However, as testing has become more widely available, it seems to be taking individuals years to detox halides and allow the iodine to enter the cells. Consequently, there is no set time that a person can expect to supplement and reach saturation levels.

    It's very encouraging stuff. Good idea for starting slow. I think I'm going to go ahead and go back to 50 mg/day, 100 mg might be too much for me. I'd rather deal with a more gentler detox if possible. After all, slow and steady wins the race! :)
     
  10. PatJ

    PatJ Senior Member

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    There may be an exception to this depending on the reasons for taking iodine. I'm adding this here for anyone with Hashimoto's who encounters this thread. In Stephanie Buist's document she has an interesting section (page 10) on Hashimoto's and iodine (part c refers to going low and slow backfiring in this case):

     
  11. keenly

    keenly Senior Member

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    Just so everyone knows:Iodine can compete with Lithium. Low lithium effects B12 transport, glutamate levels, sleep and can make one very depressed.

    I am using nascent Iodine mid day, then Lithium at night. Both are important.
     
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