P2P, or not P2P, that is the question
As the 16 January, 2015 deadline for responding to the controversial P2P draft report draws near, and in the interests of balance and representing the whole community, Phoenix Rising presents two differing views on how to react. Today, Clark Ellis flags up important content to...
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Invest in ME/Prof Jonathan Edwards statement on UK Rituximab trial, 30 July

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS News' started by Sasha, Jul 30, 2013.

  1. Bob

    Bob

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    Just in case anyone missed catly's post, the video for the latest Solve ME/CFS webinar, with Patrick McGowan re epigenetics, has now been posted:
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=QjrBP7MFVPY&feature=youtu.be&list=UUzrFQHNiCc_6AMpw_GpWZOA



    And here's the dedicated thread about the study, in case helpful:
    http://forums.phoenixrising.me/inde...tion-modifications-associated-with-cfs.31960/
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2014
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  2. Jonathan Edwards

    Jonathan Edwards Board Member

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    EBV has been known to mess up B cells to a different state for at least forty years. Once you have had an EBV infection your B cells are never the same again. But the problem is that this happens to more or less all of us (95%+ I think) so EBV messes up your B cells to a state that everyone else has and is completely normal for modern human beings. So this messing up cannot really be 'the cause' of anything. The more subtle issue is whether or not certain diseases specifically require EBV to have been around. That we know to be the case. Certain forms of Burkitt lymphoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma need EBV. Lymphomas can be cured by removing EBV. The same sort of thing goes for Helicobacter, which most of us have. Certain lymphomas disappear if you remove the Helicobacter.

    I think a lot of people working in this field think that the presence of EBV may 'permit' certain types of ME from occurring, but something else must explain why some people have this sort of ME and most people do not.
     
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  3. aimossy

    aimossy Senior Member

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    I thought this epigenetics study- although very small adds support to other research. Pathways in epigenetics showing the immune system and metabolic and kinase (protein?) are not working properly? Well that is my take on it, but again its a small study.
     
  4. natasa778

    natasa778 Senior Member

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  5. Jonathan Edwards

    Jonathan Edwards Board Member

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    I think this is difficult to interpret. Taking hospital populations as a basis for epidemiological studies is problematic for various reasons. It also seems to me that they have not excluded a genetic reason - both MS and expression of HIV as AIDS are linked to HLA genes and maybe mutually exclusively. And as they point out it is very difficult to disentangle the potential causal role of HIV itself and of treatment. All in all the idea that the HIV treatment was the reason for a lower incidence of MS looks to me pretty speculative and not the most plausible. I don't think the finding would change my way of thinking about viruses and MS.
     
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  6. Bob

    Bob

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    Last edited: Aug 31, 2014
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  7. Sasha

    Sasha Fine, thank you

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    You've saved me the job of linking to it, so thanks, Bob! I thought it deserved a new thread, given that it's news that even people not following this 1,000-post thread would want to see. No reason not to discuss it here, of course.
     
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