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Interpreting my new labs (Iron, Ferritin) and more

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS Discussion' started by drob31, Aug 12, 2014.

  1. drob31

    drob31 Senior Member

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    So I've been getting a ton of blood work done lately because it's so fun. I use privatemdlabs.com with the 15% off coupon because it's so cheap and I don't need a doctor's sign off. I got iron/ferritin/TIBC blood work done because I'm a carrier from the hemochromatosis gene.

    While it shows that I'm "within range," It seems that my Ferritin is rather high. I'm confused about these numbers. Some are borderline low and some are borderline high. Is my Ferritin high?

    TIBC: 258 REF: 250-450 ug/dL
    UIBC: 155 REF: 150-375 ug/dL
    Iron, Serum: 103 REF: 40-155 ug/dL
    Iron Saturation: 40 REF: 15-55%
    Ferritin, Serum: 314 REF: 30-400 ng/mL


    I've been reading that 300 ng is pretty high for Ferritin.


    Bonus:

    Progesterone: 0.7 REF: .2-1.4
    Cholesterol Total: 149 REF: 100-199 (seems a bit low)

    My thoughts with these two labs were to see how much progesterone I had (.07), to see how much the adrenal glands were producing, and of course cholesterol is important as well, as it's converted to preg... so it seems that part is working ok.
     
  2. drob31

    drob31 Senior Member

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    golden likes this.
  3. BadBadBear

    BadBadBear Senior Member

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    Rocky Mountains
    Kresser says ~150 for men is optimal. However, inflammation can cause falsely high ferritin numbers. And from my spouse's testing, it made a difference when he fasted from vitamin C and any supplements that contain iron. In our one-rat experiment, his iron was in the 550 range while taking C and tiny dose of iron in his daily supplements. Two weeks later it was in 470 range after he discontinued his vitamins. He is giving blood via double red cell donations to correct his overload, his doc is kinda-sorta supervising (don't think the doc really gives a #$%$ about it, though).

    If you try donating blood to see if you feel better, will you please post back as to whether you find it helpful in terms of energy, fatigue, etc.?
     
    drob31 likes this.
  4. drob31

    drob31 Senior Member

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    I will, thanks for the feedback. It's on my list of things to do.

    I just can't decide what's next:

    H Pyroluri antibiodies
    Lyme
    Zinc
    Copper
    C Reactive Protein
    Anti-Nuclear DNA autoimmune profile
    Homocysteine
    folic acid and b12


    I might as well just do every test on the planet while I'm at it. I can budget it as well since PMDL is only like 50$ a test. So i'll just do 1-2 a week.
     
  5. BadBadBear

    BadBadBear Senior Member

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    Rocky Mountains
    In my state, you can order your own bloodtests, so I have checked all kinds of random things, too. :) I keep thinking I'll find a smoking gun, but there hasn't been one yet.
     
  6. drob31

    drob31 Senior Member

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    I technically can't order blood tests through private md labs in my state, so I put a fake address in there, and then drive to the lab in the other state 30 min away. It has something to do with the FDA not wanting people trying to treat their own conditions, kind of like how 23andme.com is not allowed to send kits to my state. I just had it sent to someone in a state where it is allowed.
     
  7. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

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    I don't agree with Mercola on this one...I agree more with Stop the Thyroid Madness and Dr Mariano's position that ferritin should be at least 70-90 ng/ml and ideally 100-150 (possible slightly more for menstruating women and less for men). Sufficient iron has important implications for thyroid and adrenal health.

    I would say that 300 ng/ml is on the high side and agree that it may be due to inflammation. I doubt you would be diagnosed with hemochromatosis though since your TIBC is still fine. I would keep an eye on it though and see what you might could do to lower systemic inflammation in general.
     
  8. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    1000 is nothing

    I have replied on a similar thread, but ferritin is a marker of inflammation, not just iron. What happens is that cells leak ferritin, especially dying cells. So it can be considered a marker of cell death. As iron goes up we make more ferritin, hence we release more ferritin, and serum levels go up. However it is likely that inflammation also drives ferritin synthesis. Many disease, typically inflammatory, have elevated ferritin. This includes lymphoma, kidney and liver disease, and even alcoholism - not that the last one will be seen very much in ME. I have a suspicion that ME can raise ferritin in subgroups.

    I am a haemochromatosis carrier, so I have mine checked regularly.

    One final point, just in case, if high ferritin occurs with cataracts at a young age it could be a genetic disorder. I forget the name of it.
     
  9. drob31

    drob31 Senior Member

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    Thanks for the info, I'm a carrier as well.

    In regards to liver or kidney disease, is a low ALT/AST count sufficient to rule out liver disease?

    Is a normal GFR or eGFR enough to rule out kidney disease? I'm having a urine analysis done this weekend as well...
     
  10. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Logan, Queensland, Australia
    Low ALT/AST indicates you probably don't have liver disease. I don't know enough to comment on GFR. Most of the common causes of high ferritin listed are not present in most patients. Its a checklist ... what is wrong here? No, not that one, no not this one, hmmm, what about that other one?

    The problem is that most infections and most cancers are associated with high ferritin, so that's a lot of things to rule out.

    I laughed to myself when they tested my blood alcohol. An ME patient, who is a heavy drinker? It happens, but its very rare.
     

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