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Internal tremors, anyone?

Discussion in 'Neurological/Neuro-sensory' started by Boule de feu, Jul 24, 2010.

  1. sterlinprince

    sterlinprince

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    Well as you have this problem you should check out it properly than consult the doctor for getting treatment. If you have notice in the rare cases than also you should get the treatment because it can cause problem. If you have noticed it just in the morning than I think it would be of some other reason. But do not try to take any kind of risk for your health.
  2. Mithriel

    Mithriel Senior Member

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    Parvo, that was wonderful. It makes sense of so much.

    ME Research UK have vascular experts doing studies for them. I was part of one which showed that acetylcholine was not being mopped up as quickly as it should so the blood vessels were affected.

    They have also shown that the blood vessels lose elasticity the longer a person has ME/CFS.

    Simpson's work in NZ found that blood cells were not properly shaped so they did not flow properly.

    Blood flow in ME/CFS is definitely a good thing to study.

    On the hypoglycaemia side, the liver releases blood sugar under the control of the autonomic nervous system. I think it could be this side of things that causes our attacks and would explain why we are left feeling awful in a way that diabetics with hypos aren't. The hypoglycaemia is just the most apparent sign of the ANS going wrong.

    Another are where some DECENT RESEARCH could make our lives much better.

    Mithriel
  3. parvofighter

    parvofighter Senior Member

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    Wow - and thanks!

    Right back atcha Mithriel. Thanks so much for the link to ME Research UK's very interesting research. Here is a copy of their completed research in this general area. Very interesting stuff....

    Inflammation and arterial stiffness in patients with ME/CFS
    Dr Faisel Khan, The Institute of Cardiovascular Research, University of Dundee, Dundee, UK

    Is chronic fatigue syndrome associated with platelet activation?

    Dr Gwen Kennedy, The Institute of Cardiovascular Research, University of Dundee, Dundee

    Oxidative stress levels are raised in chronic fatigue syndrome and are associated with clinical symptoms

    Dr Gwen Kennedy, The Institute of Cardiovascular Research, University of Dundee, Dundee

    Peripheral cholinergic function in humans with chronic fatigue syndrome, Gulf War syndrome and with illness following organophosphate exposure

    Dr Faisel Khan, The Institute of Cardiovascular Research, University of Dundee, Dundee

    Increased neutrophil apoptosis in chronic fatigue syndrome

    Dr Gwen Kennedy, The Institute of Cardiovascular Research, University of Dundee, Dundee

    Plasma endothelin-1 levels in chronic fatigue syndrome

    Dr Gwen Kennedy, The Institute of Cardiovascular Research, University of Dundee, Dundee

    Prolonged acetylcholine-induced vasodilatation in the peripheral microcirculation of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

    Dr Faisel Khan, The Institute of Cardiovascular Research, University of Dundee, Dundee

    Enhanced sensitivity of the peripheral cholinergic vascular response in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome
    Dr Vance Spence, The Institute of Cardiovascular Research, University of Dundee, Dundee

    What it ultimately boils down to is that famous saying: "If you listen to the patient, they are telling you the diagnosis". Geez...
  4. aiden424

    aiden424

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    I get a vibrating on the inside feeling too. When it's really bad you can see my hands shaking. It kind of feels like my brain and body are having a power surge that I can't shut off.

    Kathy
  5. I also have that inner vibration and it is worse when I'm worse. Like an inner hum. For me it is a symptom I have when I feel worse and it goes when I am well. I have been well a few times and then had a relapse - that is the first indication I'm about to get sicker and sicker.
    rosie26 likes this.
  6. Boule de feu

    Boule de feu Senior Member

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    I hope it won't be the case for me... I don't know how I could handle more of what I am experiencing right now. :worried:
  7. Boule de feu

    Boule de feu Senior Member

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    To Parvofighter :

    Thank you so much for your posts. It shed (A LOT OF) light on the matter.
  8. Boule de feu

    Boule de feu Senior Member

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  9. taniaaust1

    taniaaust1 Senior Member

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    When i get internal tremors its either due to my hypoglycemia or having over done things physically (or possibly going over stressed), in which the internal tremors can be a precurser to actual visable tremors (if I get worst). This is for myself a sure warning I need to reassess what im doing.
  10. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

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    I also have this and the vibration gets worse when I'm sick or have over exerted myself. According to recent blood test I do not have Parvo. The vibrating/tremors is very annoying at best and emotionally draining. Just another 'hypocondriac' symptom I have had every day for now I dont know how long
  11. Boule de feu

    Boule de feu Senior Member

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    Many of our symptoms make us doubt that our illness is real. At times, they are so unusual. We don't know what to think. ;-)
    roxie60 likes this.
  12. Womble

    Womble

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    I have severe tremors, but they are more outward tremors that resemble a Parkinson's movement disorder.
  13. Womble

    Womble

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    Actually, what do you mean by internal tremors, is that the same thing as external tremors? :D
  14. rosie26

    rosie26 Senior Member

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    I think this is common in M.E. It's an internal tremor not always visible externally. I had it constantly when I was severe. I mostly get it when I am deteriorating or having over done it, which happens often.
    Some tremors are visible though.

    There are different kinds of internal tremor in my experience.

    There is the "toxic tremor", which feels like poison circulating in the blood vessels.
    The deep "chill tremor" when deteriorating.
    And a "vibrating tremor" when having over done it.
    There are others but I can't find the words to explain them properly.
    leela and Purple like this.
  15. Apollonia

    Apollonia

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    I'm not sure if I have the same feeling as you have all described. It certainly comes when I am most tired and have "overdone it", whatever it is, but I would not compare it to a vibration. The sensation is as if I were crumbling inside, falling apart internally (in my thorax and abdomen) over and over and over again, which may sound minor, and almost ridiculous, but it is worse than any pain I have ever had, and I've had some. It lasts no more than 15 or 20 minutes at a time, fortunately, because if it went on longer I swear to God I'd lose my reason, or jump off a tall building. Nothing works on it except rest, and patience, if available. It doesn't come as often now as it did when I first fell ill, back when dinosaurs stalked the earth, and didn't know my limitations, or didn't want to know them.

    I also get trembling in my hands, klutziness, general muscle weakness, etc., but this inner crumbling is a quite distinct phenomenon.

    Parvofighter: The material on blood flow is fascinating. Thank you for the reading suggestions.
  16. Forbin

    Forbin Forbin

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    I had this sort of sensation, both internally and on the surface of the skin, 24/7 for the first several years after coming down with ME. I described it as a “vibration,” “buzzing” or “shakiness.” It seemed related to, but not identical with the “hand tremor” I had developed about five years before the sudden onset of ME. [Like many, my onset followed a severe case of the flu].

    Unlike the hand tremor, this "internal vibration" was not visible.

    I had a couple of glucose tolerance tests which were normal.

    It certainly didn't seem related to my level of anxiety. It was just always there at a constant level, regardless of any change in mood or stress. As I say, it was not externally visible, although it was tempting to try to associate it with my long standing hand tremor [which became more prominent after the onset of ME].

    There is a penny arcade game where you grab onto two “electrodes” and see how long you can hold on as the “voltage” supposedly increases. Some of those machines actually do use electricity, but I’ve read that others just use high-frequency vibration generators in the “electrodes” [video game controllers now have a similar feature which is used to "buzz" the player]. At any, rate, it sort of felt like that penny arcade game on a relatively low level - all the time.

    In my case, this “shakiness” abated after about 4 years of ME - never to return - regardless of my level of anxiety or stress. The hand tremor, however, remained.
    rosie26 likes this.

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