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Interesting XMRV research funded by NIH

Discussion in 'XMRV Research and Replication Studies' started by Jemal, May 17, 2011.

  1. Jemal

    Jemal Senior Member

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    This project got 1.5 million dollars.

    More text:
    http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=8158079&icde=8151490
     
  2. liquid sky

    liquid sky Senior Member

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    "In addition to being a horizontally transmitted infectious agent, xmrv is a threat to the human genome."

    That just about says it all! So glad to see it in print from a study to be conducted by the NIH. Looking for drugs to treat the infection also.
     
  3. Jemal

    Jemal Senior Member

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    This is a research project that has been funded with millions of dollars since 2007 by the way. In 2010 they focused a lot on XMRV (before that, just Gibbon Ape Leukemia Virus). There's some bold statements in the 2010 part, quoted above. I think the 2010 part has been completed, but not sure.
     
  4. Cort

    Cort Phoenix Rising Founder

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    Nice catch Jemal.

    I agree that the horizontal transmission of XMRV is intriguing and how interesting that primates across the country appear to be infected with an XMRV-like virus.

    I'm not so sure about piggybacking on CFS for this. There no CFS patients in this study and I don't know that this study should be held up as an example of their commitment to increasing CFS research funding. My guess is that the research community is very interested in XMRV and will continue researching it no matter how it turns out in CFS.

    If XMRV works out, though, a study like this is clearly what CFS patients would want to see, though. I imagine its quite expensive.....
     
  5. Jemal

    Jemal Senior Member

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    I agree completely, this study is not focused on CFS. Not even on XMRV (initially). It might yield further evidence XMRV is not contamination though and that is helpful. As I said, there's some bold statements in there... like XMRV being a threat to the human genome. That doesn't sound like laboratory contamination.
     
  6. Cort

    Cort Phoenix Rising Founder

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    I can see how they would be interested in XMRV.....who knows what the research will ultimately find???
     
  7. Jemal

    Jemal Senior Member

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    The CDC did a study in 1994 by the way looking for several viruses in 21 CFS patients. They also tested for GALV :D

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8148438

    Anyway, maybe monkeys are the culprit again. They have been looking at mice, while gibbons may have a XMRV like virus. It wouldn't surprise me if it popped up in other animals though. Cats maybe? We'll see how this pans out...
     
  8. Bob

    Bob

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    Interesting project. Switzer is involved. He seems to be taking XMRV very seriously now, and getting really stuck in with complex and advanced research.
     
  9. Rrrr

    Rrrr Senior Member

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    this seems like very big news to me. am i missing something or is this a complete turn around for the cdc, saying xmrv is a threat to the human genome.
     
  10. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Hi Jemal, this was debated heavily on some threads last year iirc. XMRV and PMLVs are mammalian viruses. Every mammal could carry it (although some mice are immune), from cats and dogs, to sheep and cattle. We should be looking at getting more research veterinarians interested.

    Bye
    Alex
     
  11. currer

    currer Senior Member

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    I interpret this paper to suggest that they are concerned about the implications of the XMRV discovery for gene therapy as gammaretroviral vectors are used.

    I heard somewhere that HIV had not endogenised yet - that is incorporated itself into the germline.
    Maybe they think XMRV might find it easier to do?

    This paper is an interesting find.

    They also point out that retroviruses usually spread from infected cell to adjacent cells (forming a block of infected cells) and do not travel through the blood. This would mean that tissue samples are more likely to be positive for XMRV than blood. Assuming you got the right tissue that is.

    They make it sound as if they know that XMRV can infect the germ cells. If so isn't this very serious?
    Can anyone enlarge on this?
    As far as I know HIV and HTLV 1 have not done this.
     
  12. Rrrr

    Rrrr Senior Member

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    dr. racaniello gave me permission to post this. -- rrrr
    _____


    Date: Wed, 18 May 2011 11:36:36 -0400
    From: Vincent Racaniello
    Subject: Re: is this big news?

    This is a progress report for a funded NIH grant, and they are
    summarizing what they have done (work on making viral vectors) and
    what they plan to do (look for the origin of XMRV). Their statement
    'XMRV is a threat to the human genome' appears to be alarming some.
    But it's true of any retrovirus - these viruses integrate a DNA copy
    of their genetic material into that of the host cell, and therefore
    can act as mutagens. This would be a concern if XMRV were indeed
    rampant in the human population; but there is no evidence that this is
    the case. Plus none of the data have yet been published. Until that
    happens, I would not worry about this; it's not big news at all.
    ---
    Vincent Racaniello, PhD
    twiv.tv | virology.ws | microbeworld.org/twip | microbeworld.org/twim
    | twitter.com/profvrr
    'Trust science, not scientists'


    On Tue, May 17, 2011 at 9:42 PM,
    > professor,
    >
    > is this nih study big news? it says that xmrv is a threat to the human
    > genome. it is an nih funded study. thanks!
    >
    >http://forums.phoenixrising.me/showthread.php?11716-Interesting-XMRV-research-funded-by-NIH
     
  13. Jemal

    Jemal Senior Member

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    Thanks for sharing!
    It sounds a bit like: "Nothing to see here, move along".

    I think there's more to this story. We'll see...
     
  14. Bob

    Bob

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    lol, Jemal, that's exactly what I was going to post!

    "Nothing to see here, move along..."

    The comments do sound like they are trying very hard to make the study sound uninteresting, unimportant and insignificant, don't they!


    The study is very interesting, but the words "a threat to the human genome" are probably scientific speak...
    It's a fact that if a retrovirus gets into the germline cells, then the virus will be passed to every cell of the offspring, but that doesn't mean that it's a threat to the entire human race.
    But at least they are investigating and taking it seriously.
     
  15. ixchelkali

    ixchelkali Senior Member

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    Isn't this backwards? Isn't traditional person-to-person infection horizontal and transmission to offspring as a Mendelian trait vertical?
     
  16. ixchelkali

    ixchelkali Senior Member

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    I don't think the part that says XMRV is a threat to the human genome is a big deal: any human retrovirus is a threat to the human genome, so that's not exactly news. But I think this part would be very cool, if they succeed:


    Also this part:


    I was surprised when they said that " the spread of most retroviruses is mediated not by direct virus infection but by cell-cell transmission from an infected cell to an uninfected cell"; I didn't know that. Then why is the emphasis in XMRV in ME/CFS on viremia? Is it just because that's what the Lombardi, et al, paper described? Or because they don't know where else to look for it? And if it's in the germ cells, would testing sperm samples find it?

    I didn't even know about the gibbon ape leukemia virus. I knew that feline leukemia virus is a gammaretrovirus, and the koala retrovirus, but I don't remember hearing about the gibbons. Poor beasties.
     
  17. Bob

    Bob

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    It would be nice to think that Judy has been looking for the virus in the tissues, but maybe she's just been trying to perfect her blood techniques.
    Looking in tissues would involve lots of technical exploratory work, so I guess only a few dedictated scientists would be interested.

    This is interesting, from Hillary Johnson's website:

    So was this contamination or had they actually detected a virus similar to XMRV?

    It's an interesting thought.
     
  18. Jemal

    Jemal Senior Member

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    That Gibbon Ape Leukemia Virus is popping up a lot...
     
  19. currer

    currer Senior Member

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    The gibbons are just innocent bystanders in my opinion.
     
  20. ukxmrv

    ukxmrv Senior Member

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    ixchelkali, Dr Mikovits said something like that at the IiME conference. She was talking about dendritic cells in HTLV and that infection was direct from cell to cell (well at least I think that is what she was saying).
     

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