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Interesting UK blog: Positive Affect as Coercive Strategy [relevent to BPS, DWP, CFS]

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Esther12, Mar 26, 2014.

  1. Esther12

    Esther12

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    Taster:

    [2] Berlant Lauren (2006) Cruel Optimism, Differences 17.5: 21-36; and New Formations (2008) (longer version); (2007) Slow Death, Critical Inquiry 33: 754-780; Howell A & Veronka J (2012) The Politics of Resilience & recovery in mental health care

    [3] Friedli L (2012) What we’ve tried hasn’t worked: the politics of asset based public health, Critical Public Health

    http://centreformedicalhumanities.o...coercive-strategy-the-case-of-workfare/#_edn2

    I thought it was worth reading, but for busy people, I've pulled out the bits I thought may be of most interest:

    [7] K Day, What?! You’re Telling Me You Lost My Dunce Work? The Joy of the JobCentre Programme blog, 20 August 2013.

    [8] Izzy Koksal, Adventures at A4E, Izzy Koksal blog, 13 April 2012

    [9] Email to Boycott Workfare. MWA is mandatory unpaid work activity

    [10] Whitehead M, Jones R and Pykett J. (2011) Governing irrationality, or a more than rational government? Reflections on the rescientisation of decision making in British public policy. Environment and Planning A 43: 2819-2837.


    Also, this sounds familiar:

    [14] Rahim et al (2012) Evaluation of SVLTU DWP Research Summary (emphasis added)

    [17] The Skwawkbox, DWP: Fake Psych ‘Test’ Training Given by Unqualified ‘Experts, The Skwawkbox blog, 4 July 2013.

    [18] Cromby J & Willis MEH (2013) Nudging into subjectification: Governmentality and psychometrics Critical Social Policy

    [19] This delegation resonates with Mel Y Chen’s description of compassion: ‘an affective obligation separated from justice.’

    [20] Nussbaum M (2012) Who is the happy warrior? Philosophy, happiness research, and public policy International Review of Economics, 2012, vol. 59, issue 4, pages 335-361

    [21] There is a wider debate to be had about discourses of positive affect that have their roots in resistance – notably in resistance to the imposition of psychiatric labels and diagnostic categories. It’s an important question: what distinguishes the stories that form part of these traditions (making political meaning out of adversity) from the ‘recovery stories’ appropriated and expropriated by mental health and other institutions? Howell A and Veronka J The Politics of Resilience & recovery in mental health care


    I might stick this related BBC news article here too (not least because this one is about America, and that last blog left me feeling rather ashamed of British society and culture... I'll try to spread that around a bit):

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-26669971
     
  2. Sean

    Sean Senior Member

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    It is what I call the optimism ideology, a particularly insidious and malignant version of blame the victim.
     
  3. Valentijn

    Valentijn WE ARE KINA

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    Why are they spending funds pursuing "soft targets" such as supposedly getting the unemployed closer to work, if it's having no effect in actually getting them employment? Getting someone to (supposedly) 99.9% almost-employed is still UNemployed, and therefore having no actual financial benefit for anyone, and is ultimately showing that this approach is a failure.

    Either the people running these programs are stupid and wasteful, or it's one more arbitrary hurdle used as a pretext to deny benefits to those who are deserving of them.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2014
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  4. A.B.

    A.B. Senior Member

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    Forced optimism is a form of denial of reality. Losing touch with reality inevitably leads to disaster.

    They are believers in an ideology they love so much that they fail to see its shortcomings.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2014
  5. A.B.
    see Ian Duncan Smith, a man so out of touch, o lying, he will inevitably degenerate into mass murder if not stopped.
    it is ideology gone mad.
    History shows the results of what occurs when groups go down this route and it's never pretty.
     
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  6. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    @Esther12

    This is all very interesting. Thanks for posting this.

    We are all so ingrained with this notion that we sometimes don't even realize it. It's so easy to fall back on this type of thinking.

    I just saw your video with Barbara Ehrenreich on another thread and I think it would be apt on this thread but will let you make that decision.

    I have read several of her books, my favorite being Nickel and Dimed and a friend just gave me a copy of Bright Sided which as you probably already know, deals with this very issue.

    I have said many a time, if I could only think myself out of this DD, I would have been well a long time ago.:)Barb
     
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  7. Esther12

    Esther12

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    Yeah - I can find myself being instinctively unfair to others in this way, even though I've spent quite a lot of time thinking about how unreasonable it is!
     
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  8. Wildcat

    Wildcat

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    .
    'Positive Psychology' - apparently the most popular course at Harvard University!

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    “…Positive psychology "treatment" on soldiers or veterans will no doubt train them to suppress their reactions to the brutal acts they were charged with committing on a day-to-day basis in Iraq, Afghanistan, etc. To some extent, Seligman's work would have to assist soldiers' or veterans' under mental duress in finding a way to suppress what I will call their "empathy gene." Reasonably, they would be taught to move on without atoning for whatever they had done in war that has seriously disturbed them….”
    .


    .
    ‘No-Bid Military Contract Winner Martin Seligman and His Response to Allegations on His Connection to Torture’

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    Page 1: http://www.opednews.com/articles/1/No-Bid-Military-Contract-W-by-Kevin-Gosztola-101018-272.html
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    Page 2: http://www.opednews.com/articles/2/No-Bid-Military-Contract-W-by-Kevin-Gosztola-101018-272.html
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    Page 3: http://www.opednews.com/articles/3/No-Bid-Military-Contract-W-by-Kevin-Gosztola-101018-272.html
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  9. Sean

    Sean Senior Member

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    It is a salutary lesson to catch yourself doing to others something that you despise being done to yourself. Just shows the power of social conditioning to make hypocrites of us all.
     
  10. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Question: can you train ordinary people to become mass murderers and assassins using positive psychology, so they actually feel good about what they do?
     
  11. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    I hold the ENTIRE medical profession (except for the few loud voices who are crying out) as collectively responsible for most of this. Not to blame, but they have the power to stop it, and they don't. Its passive permission to abuse.

    Individual doctors, psychs etc have less responsibility, but some subset of them also have blame.
     
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