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Inelastic compression wraps

Discussion in 'Problems Standing: Orthostatic Intolerance; POTS' started by PatJ, Aug 21, 2015.

  1. PatJ

    PatJ far and free I gaze

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    I've been looking at the various options for leg compression to help with OI but have never seen any posts here about using inelastic compression wraps. The CircAid brand can be adjusted for variable compression from 20-30, 30-40, or 40-50 mmHg. Calf, thigh, and full leg wraps are available. Prices start at around $80 US for a calf compression wrap. Some brands use velcro, others use hooks. Most of the reviews are very favorable and reviewers say they are much easier to use and more comfortable than compression stockings.

    BrightLife has various brands:
    www.brightlifedirect.com/compression-alternatives.asp

    Has anyone tried this type of compression garment?
     
    Valentijn likes this.
  2. minkeygirl

    minkeygirl But I Look So Good.

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    I think there is another thread about this. Maybe with @Sushi?
     
  3. Sushi

    Sushi Senior Member Albuquerque

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    Not from me! I have looked at those but don't see why they would be better than knee socks or hose.
     
  4. PatJ

    PatJ far and free I gaze

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    Some of the advantages of the CircAid inelastic compression wraps according to various sites and reviews:
    * Adjustable compression rate from 20-30, 30-40, 40-50 mmHg. It includes a small card that allows the wearer to line up guide lines on the card with lines on the garment to determine the pressure. (This card might be difficult to use for people with blurry vision. The lines look quite fine and the adjustment range is small.)
    * Easier to put on and adjust, even for people with little strength or dexterity; no need for assistive devices or undesired aerobic workout.
    * Dynamic compression - the compression drops by a certain amount when a person is lying down, and increases again when standing or moving. A lower compression when lying down is apparently more comfortable. The drop is specific to each product. The CircAid Juxta-Lite compression drops by 10 mmHg. (See www.circaid.com/help/product-faqs/static_stiffness.php for more information)
    * Can be worn 24 hours per day if necessary

    The CircAid site has usage info and videos: www.circaid.com/products/juxta-lite/jl_standard.php

    I think most of the points above apply to any inelastic compression wrap but the CircAid is the only one I've seen so far that includes a precise way to adjust the compression based on mmHg values.

    I've ordered one of the Juxta-lite wraps to try it out. I'll report back when it arrives.
     
    ahimsa, SickOfSickness and Scarecrow like this.

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