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Increased Stool Transit Time

Discussion in 'Gastrointestinal and Urinary' started by xks201, Oct 26, 2012.

  1. xks201

    xks201 Senior Member

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    Sorry...title meant to say decreased but I have no idea how to change it. lol So I began to thinking... many of us here have a really "fast" digestive system, right? Well, if the food is leaving the stomach at such a high speed then it ultimately is not digesting properly. I would think a drug or method to induce constipation would be of great value to most of us. Then we could have time to absorb nutrients, and possibly a better microbial environment would develop. I am curious as to how many of you find yourselves running to the toilet too often.
  2. ggingues

    ggingues $10 gift code at iHerb GAS343 of $40

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    A moderator can change it, just ask them.

    I used to have the same problem all the time, not as bad anymore, more occasional. Not really sure what did it though, I think it might have been LDN?

    GG
  3. xks201

    xks201 Senior Member

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    LDN does regulate intestinal transit...interesting.
  4. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    Don't get me wrong but for many PWcs this would be exactly the wrong strategy. Constipation is bad for a lot of reasons. First of all, a decreased transit time increases the growth of bad bacteria. Second of all, a decreased transit time increases the risk for allergies because of the increased contact between gut and food molecules. Third of all, you have to ask yourself what the reason for increased transit time is. Does it have a pure psychological cause or does the gut try to get rid of food because it is inflamed, suffers from a viral infection etc.? If it is the latter and the gut just can't handle the food, inducing constipation would be anything but good. We are all different, so if you don't have allergies and no leaky gut, if your gut is fine and if an increased transit time has minor biochemical causes, then do what you think is right. In case an increased transit time, is a pure defense mechanism, I would highly recommend to stay away from everything that slows transit.
    taniaaust1 likes this.
  5. ukxmrv

    ukxmrv Senior Member

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    I've got delayed stomach emptying and slow food transit so the opposite problem. After eating the food just sits in my stomach and I taken betaine HCL to move things along. Do get bouts of diarrhea though at times. After bad food poisoning I once had years of diarrhea.

    Lots of things have made me constipated in the past and I'd not like to go back to that. Didn't have any health benefits and my digestion was terrible. Swollen, painful stomach. Anti-depressants and morphine based painkillers do this to me
  6. redrachel76

    redrachel76 Senior Member

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    I have slow food transit. I don't know if slow or fast food transit is more common in this illness.
    I just know we have bad digestion more often than "normals".

    I think fast transit is preferable to constipation because there are more things to treat it.

    I would try to see what in my diet slows the transit time or speeds it up.
    White rice, whole almonds, boiled carrots (not raw) and freshly squeezed lemon juice in cold water are supposed to constipate or stop frequent/fast transit times according to my dietician.
  7. xks201

    xks201 Senior Member

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    Just curious if there was a correlation. We all could have different causes of fatigue too though.
  8. nanonug

    nanonug Senior Member

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    A few months back I was diagnosed with an overgrowth of Morganella Morganii after doing the Metametrix GI Effects Profile test. Taking the right kind of antibiotics followed by massive amounts of VSL #3 improved things dramatically. So, my suggestion is to always start with testing. I must say that I am a big fan of the above referenced test.
  9. Enid

    Enid Senior Member

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    I agree with nanonug - it was a course of antibiotics (following extraction of 2 infected teeth !) which did wonders for the bowels swinging as they were between constipation and very loose indeed with much urgency. We don't get your tests here in the UK but I think the principle is right - repopulate the gut.
  10. nanonug

    nanonug Senior Member

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    Actually, in this case you do: GI Effects (UK).
    Enid likes this.
  11. Enid

    Enid Senior Member

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    Thanks nanonug I'll keep in mind - I did the Kenny de Mieleir from Belgium test 2 years ago (cytotoxic if I recall) and nearly off the scale. But the chance - serendipity - of high dose Amoxcillan following tooth extractions followed by masses of good probiotics worked wonders.

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