Dr. Bateman answers IOM questions from the community: Part 2
Clark Ellis brings us Part 2 of an interview with Dr. Lucinda Bateman, where she answered questions posed by the patient community …
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inability to clear out aldehyde due to lack of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2? Candida?

Discussion in 'Detox: Methylation; B12; Glutathione; Chelation' started by lizw118, Jun 16, 2014.

  1. lizw118

    lizw118 Senior Member

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    I am wondering if this is a problem for some of us? Someone on another thread (Vegas) mentioned that sweet-smelling sweat is a sign of dehydrogenation. I feel better when I have sweet smelling sweat, which sometimes happens after I get certain treatments like acupuncture. I wonder if that is because I am able to clear out the aldehyde from excess candida during those times. Otherwise maybe I am not so efficient at clearing that stuff out of my system. Does anyone have thoughts on this? Could this be part of the problem, and if so, it doesn't look like there is any way to supplement aldehyde dehydrogenase 2, unfortunately, so what can be done about this?
     
  2. Sherlock

    Sherlock tart cherry etc. for joints, insomnia

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    Czechosherlockia, USA
    Lack of aldehyde dehydrogenases could account for alcohol intolerance and also exercise induced problems. Acetaldehyde is the first breakdown product of alcohol. Malondialdehyde is used in studies as a post workout marker.

    And so then maybe lack of sleep exacerbates that:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=15726022
    "A novel observation: melatonin's interaction with malondiadehyde."
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2014
  3. IreneF

    IreneF Senior Member

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    You would probably know if you lacked alcohol dehydrogenase, because drinking would give you an immediate hangover. It's genetic.
     
  4. lizw118

    lizw118 Senior Member

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    Thanks for the replies. I have actually become intolerant of alcohol over the past ten years. I wonder if it's because I have so much candida now that the alcoholic byproducts are too much for my body to detoxify. Maybe it isn't due to a lack of aldehyde dehydrogenase, but some other problem in the chain of events that causes dehydrogenation. I wish I knew what that was and what to do about it, though.
     
  5. xks201

    xks201 Senior Member

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    Probably just a molybdenum deficiency. Lol if you were lacking aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes yes you would get drunk right away and probably would have other serious metabolic issues than funny smelling sweat.
     
  6. Valentijn

    Valentijn Activity Level: 3

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    That's how I feel, especially since getting ME but even beforehand. A few sips was enough to make me tipsy. Now even one sip makes me feel pretty sick.
     
  7. xks201

    xks201 Senior Member

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    Try molybdenum.
     
  8. Sherlock

    Sherlock tart cherry etc. for joints, insomnia

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    There's a poll and thread here somehere about alcohol intolerance.

    Does smog also make you sick?
     
  9. lizw118

    lizw118 Senior Member

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    Thanks all. xks201 actually sweet smelling sweat is an indication that treatment is working for me. It happens when I get acupuncture a lot and I feel much better. I also do have thyroid issues. I wonder if I have a slight dehydrogenation issue? But not full blown? At any rate I have ordered some molybdenum to see if that helps.
    @Sherlock, smog makes me feel bad, yes, but not exactly in the same way alcohol does. But they both give me terrible sinus pressure and headaches.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2014
  10. Sherlock

    Sherlock tart cherry etc. for joints, insomnia

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    Liz, smog contains acetaldehyde.
     
  11. lizw118

    lizw118 Senior Member

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    @Sherlock very interesting. The other day there was smog and I did feel awful. Hmmm...
     
    Sherlock likes this.
  12. aaron_c

    aaron_c Senior Member

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    I have a related question: I am trying to understand the difference between:

    Aldehyde Dehydrogenase: (NAD+) + H20 + Acetaldehyde -> NADH + (H+) + Acetic Acid

    and

    Acetaldehyde Dehydrogenase: Acetaldehyde + NAD+ + Coenzyme AAcetyl-CoA + NADH + H+


    From what I have shared (taken from wikipedia, or in the case of aldehyde dehydrogenase, interpreted from wikipedia), they seem obviously to code for different reactions. But here is what Wikipedia says about human acetaldehyde dehydrogenase:

    In humans, there are three known genes which encode this enzymatic activity, ALDH1A1, ALDH2, and the more recently discovered ALDH1B1 (also known as ALDH5). These enzymes are members of the larger class of aldehyde dehydrogenases.
    As far as I can tell, all of these genes code for aldehyde dehydrogenases, not acetaldehyde dehydrogenases, meaning that they code for enzymes that perform the first function I listed and not the second. I understand that it is possible for acetic acid to take part in the formation of Acetyl-CoA through two more reactions:

    1. Acetic Acid does the acid thing (forgive my lack of chemistry terminology) and loses a hydrogen, becoming Acetate.
    2. Acetate is then added to CoA by Acetyl CoA Synthetase in this reaction:
    Acetate + ATP + CoA -> Acetyl CoA + AMP + PPi
    In short, it appears that using the aldehyde dehydrogenase pathway to form Acetyl-CoA ends up costing us the converstion of an ATP to AMP, while the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase pathway does not.

    So I am confused when the enzyme that codes for ALDH2 (Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Family, Mitochondrial) is also known as "Acetaldehyde Dehydrogenase 2." Should I just assume that the reaction for acetaldehyde dehydrogenase only applies to some bacteria, and assume that in humans the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase reaction encompasses anything happening within these steps: Acetaldehyde -> Acetic Acid -> Acetate -> Acetyl-CoA? That is what seems mostly likely to me, but I can't find anyone who comes out and says it.

    Thank you in advance!
     

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