The 12th Invest in ME Research Conference June, 2017, Part 2
MEMum presents the second article in a series of three about the recent 12th Invest In ME International Conference (IIMEC12) in London.
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In the gut, immunity is a two-way street: dysbiosis and T cells

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by natasa778, Jul 12, 2014.

  1. natasa778

    natasa778 Senior Member

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    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140710130613.htm

    great --- now only the million dollar question remains, how to reconstitute faulty immune cells? (and I mean safely, easilly and without breaking the bank ;)


    +++++

    In the study, the group demonstrated that the regulation by immune T cells of immunoglobulin A (IgA), an antibody that plays a key role in immunity in the gut, is critical for the maintenance of rich bacterial communities in mammal guts.


    They began by studying mice with various immune deficiencies and attempted to restore the mice by providing the missing components. They monitored the bacterial communities in the mice's guts with or without the reconstitutions and evaluated the flow of information between the immune system and bacteria. They discovered that the precise control of IgA production by regulatory T cells is critical for keeping a rich and balanced bacterial community.

    To investigate how bacteria feed back to the host, they looked at germ-free mice (mice born and maintained sterile in special incubators) and young pups that had been transplanted with different bacterial communities (either by injection of bacteria or by painting the fur with fecal bacteria extracts from normal or immune-deficient mice). They discovered that the immune system "sees" and responds differently to different bacterial communities. Rich and balanced bacterial communities seem to be perceived as "self" and induce a quick maturation of the immune system and gut responses (induction of regulatory T cells and IgA), while a poor and unbalanced bacterial community is apparently perceived as "non-self" and induces responses aimed at eliminating it (T cells with inflammatory properties and IgG or IgE responses).

    According to Sidonia Fagarasan, who led the work, "This study should have an impact on the way we understand immune-related disorders associated with bacteria dysbiosis in the gut. In order to reestablish a healthy state we need to interfere not only with the bacteria, by providing probiotics or through fecal transplantation, but also with the immune system, by correcting the faults caused either by inherited deficiencies or by aging."

    "It was surprising," she continues, "to see how the reconstitution of T cell-deficient mice with a special regulatory T cell type leads to dramatic changes in gut bacterial communities. It was spectacular to see how the immune system perceives and reacts to different bacteria communities. It gives us hopes that with a better knowledge of the symbiotic relationships between the immune system and bacteria in the gut, we could intervene and induce modifications aiming to reestablish balance and restore health."
     
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  2. melihtas

    melihtas Senior Member

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    Istanbul Turkey
    This study might explain why most of us have gut problems before we got ME. I think we are not even close to finding a cure for ME since we don't even know how it started and what caused it.

    Schematic representation from the original source: http://www.riken.jp/en/pr/press/2014/20140711_1/

    [​IMG]
    Cecal bacteria from mice with rich (left panel) or poor (right panel) bacterial communities

    [​IMG]
    Schematic representation of the regulatory loop between host immune system and gut bacteria
     
  3. melihtas

    melihtas Senior Member

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    Istanbul Turkey
    Dietary Folic Acid Promotes Survival of Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells in the Colon

    Knowing that people with ME have folic acid problems and some of us get better on methylation protocol or high dose methylfolate. Can this be the reason for Treg anomalies?

    We also have very low Vitamin D levels.

    Vitamin D Status Is Positively Correlated with Regulatory T Cell Function in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2014
    Simon likes this.
  4. melihtas

    melihtas Senior Member

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    A Pivotal Role of Vitamin B9 in the Maintenance of Regulatory T Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

     
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  5. Bob

    Bob

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    England (south coast)
    Anyone interested in the above, might be interested in the following article...

    Culturing For Cures
    UCSF Scientists Explore the Bacterial Communities that Live In and On Our Bodies to Find Treatments for Disease
    By Claire Conway
    June 03, 2014
    http://www.ucsf.edu/news/2014/05/114656/culturing-cures

    It's a long and varied article, so I can't summarise it.
    But here's a tiny extract that gives a flavour:
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2014
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  6. Sasha

    Sasha Fine, thank you

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    There's an amazing story at the start of that article about a guy who cures his own ear infection in a novel way - worth the read just for that!
     
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  7. Sasha

    Sasha Fine, thank you

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    Thanks, @Bob - that's one of the most interesting articles on the microbiome in relation to health that I've read (and a very easy read for a layperson, too).
     
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