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Illness experience, depression, and anxiety in chronic fatigue syndrome (2002)

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Dolphin, Jul 7, 2011.

  1. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    Free full text: http://individual.utoronto.ca/mandel/jpr2002.pdf

    Somebody recently drew my attention to the following study. I'm not as much with a lot of the older papers (7+ years old) so wasn't aware of it.


     
  2. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    The finding is based on a question:
    The results were put under different headings by the authors - see Table 5:
     
  3. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    Thanks.

    I think I remember you (or maybe someone else) posting another paper here that showed that housebound CFS patients suffered from lower levels of emotional distress than those who were more active. Pushing oneself to the limit all the time is emotionally draining... but not doing much is emotionally difficult too. I can't believe behavioural type research has so dominated CFS research funding, and yet we still have such a poor idea as to the optimal way of behaving.
     
  4. max

    max

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    esther12... "I can't believe behavioural type research has so dominated CFS research funding, and yet we still have such a poor idea as to the optimal way of behaving."

    simply because "behavioural type research" is fraud when presented as scientific evidence. Behavioural research is based on subjective opinion, not reproducible under identical conditions as is the case with science.

    We will not win until psychiatry is exposed as fake when applied to the individual. We are all normal human beings - behaviour is not an illness, it is an individuals response to the world they live in - however far an expression in the form of a 'behaviour' is from the majority, it is still human behaviour, and therefore, normal - the behaviour may be unhelpful to the majority, nevertheless, it is just human behaviour.

    Unless a psychiatrist can read every single thought in the mind of a patient, the psychiatrist can never claim they understand behaviour and neither can they predict future outcomes of behaviour.

    Only science can find the answer to ME, it will never ever be discovered by psychiatry, the only outcome with the findings and beliefs of psychiatry is the dangerous incorrect use of medication, stigma, a downgrading of status in the individual concerned and their continued suffering.

    Psychiatry will continue its agenda of applying as much confusion and blurring of statistical analysis whenever the subject of ME is mentioned in any situation. This has been a deliberate tactic for the past 20 years.

    Questions must be asked of psychiatry - blind acceptance from successive UK governments of their interpretation of ME has not moved forward since its' first presentation so many years ago - it is no closer to finding an explanation of ME nor is it any closer to presenting a treatment. We must ask ourselves why has psychiatry been granted authority over scientific research? The NHS and NICE are perfectly happy to allow and protect the status quo. Why?

    Recently I heard an excellent and inspirational quote on the steps outside a UK court,

    "Justice has no expiry date"

    We should adopt this quote and use it at every opportunity in the faces of the psychiatry 'experts' that block medical research - Wessely accuses people with ME giving him a hard time,....... shame, my heart bleeds.

    max
     

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