Phoenix Rising tells QMUL: release the PACE trial data
Mark Berry, Acting CEO of Phoenix Rising, presents the Board of Directors’ open letter to Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) urging them to release the PACE trial data, and hopes that other non-UK organisations will join British charities in the same request...
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Hypoxen - Mitochondrial Respiration Inhibitor?

Discussion in 'General Treatment' started by stolpioni, Jul 17, 2017.

  1. stolpioni

    stolpioni

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    Came over a bottle of this, could it be any good for CFS? Or would it be detrimental? It is used as a doping drug.

    "Hypoxen belongs to a class antihypoxants and antioxidants that reduce oxygen consumption and increase the efficiency of the body in extreme situations. The drug has anti-hypoxic action by improving the efficiency of tissue respiration in hypoxia conditions, especially in high-level metabolic organs (brain, heart muscle, liver).

    Hypoxen reduces oxygen consumption with significant physical exertion, improving cell respiration, decrease in mental and physical fatigue, the successful implementation of labor-intensive physical operations.

    Negatives pharmaceutical, pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs is not established. Incompatibility of the drug with other drugs have been identified."

    "The effect of hypoxen on the oxygen consumption and activity of dehydrogenases in rat liver mitochondria has been studied. The addition of hypoxen to mitochondria caused a speed reduction of phosphorylating and uncoupling respiration. The minimal effective concentration of hypoxen was 15 microg/ml with succinate, 60 microg/ml with pyruvate or palmitoylcarnitine, and 120 microg/ml with glutamate as the substrates. The activities of malate, glutamate, and succinate dehydrogenases in mitochondria were significantly decreased by the effect of hypoxen."

    https://link.springer.com/article/10.1134/S1062359010040035
     
    Little Bluestem likes this.
  2. cfs6691

    cfs6691

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    I do not understand chemistry but I get the impression that it might have the opposite of the desired effect,that it might further reduce the body's ability to produce energy.Athletes train in as adverse conditions as possible (eg high altitude)so that when they compete in normal conditions they get an extra boost in energy.If laboratories can produce those kinds of medications,they probably could think in the opposite direction and produce medications that have the opposite effect ie help increase the body's ability to produce energy except that sport,spoting events and fitness are a multi billion dollar industry which explains the interest.
     
  3. stolpioni

    stolpioni

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    Ok, to me it sounds like the opposite. It reduces the body's need for oxygen. So should technically give more energy to your cells and make your mitochondria work better. Maybe I am understanding things wrong though.

    I think doping substances are all interesting because as you say, it's a multi billion dollar industry. If they make athletes perform better, they should be able to make sick people perform better as well.

    Another interesting substance is Meldonium.
     
  4. cfs6691

    cfs6691

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    Athletes need to reach the peak of their performance at competitions and they take insane risks in order to do that(they are not required to perform at that level all the time).I have heard that cyclists had to walk in the corridors in their hotels throughout the night to prevent their blood from clotting because that was one of the side effects of the medication they were taking.Performance enhancing drugs are not designed to maintain a healthy body,that is not even a consideration.Why do you think that reducing the body's need for oxygen would be a good thing?Mountain climbers can get sick because of the lack of oxygen.The human body has evolved to require a certain amount of oxygen for chemical reactions.
     
  5. stolpioni

    stolpioni

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    I don't think you can categorize and say "performance enhancing drugs are dangerous". All drugs are performance enhancing. Coffee is one example.
     

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