1. Patients launch $1.27 million crowdfunding campaign for ME/CFS gut microbiome study.
    Check out the website, Facebook and Twitter. Join in donate and spread the word!
Ergonomics and ME/CFS: Have You Hurt Yourself Without Knowing It?
Having a chronic illness like ME/CFS can make it hard to avoid problems that come from bad ergonomics. Jody Smith has learned some lessons the hard way ...
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Hypothalamus Plays Key Role in T2 Diabetes.

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Ema, Nov 10, 2013.

  1. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,318
    Likes:
    3,553
    Midwest USA
    http://www.washington.edu/news/2013...od-sugar-metabolism-and-diabetes-development/

    November 6, 2013

    Brain may play key role in blood sugar metabolism and diabetes development
    Michael McCarthy
    UW Health Sciences and UW Medicine

    Posted under: Health and Medicine, Research, Science

    A growing body of evidence suggests that the brain plays a key role in glucose regulation and the development of type 2 diabetes, researchers write in the Nov. 7 ssue of the journal Nature. If the hypothesis is correct, it may open the door to entirely new ways to prevent and treat this disease, which is projected to affect one in three adults in the United States by 2050.

    In the paper, lead author Dr. Michael W. Schwartz, UW professor of medicine and director of the Diabetes and Obesity Center of Excellence, and his colleagues from the universities of Cincinnati, Michigan, and Munich, note that the brain was originally thought to play an important role in maintaining normal glucose metabolism With the discovery of insulin in the 1920s, the focus of research and diabetes care shifted to almost exclusively to insulin. Today, almost all treatments for diabetes seek to either increase insulin levels or increase the body’s sensitivity to insulin.

    “These drugs,” the researchers write, “enjoy wide use and are effective in controlling hyperglycemia [high blood sugar levels], the hallmark of type 2 diabetes, but they address the consequence of diabetes more than the underlying causes, and thus control rather than cure the disease.”

    New research, they write, suggests that normal glucose regulation depends on a partnership between the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, the pancreatic islet cells, and neuronal circuits in the hypothalamus and other brain areas that are intimately involved in maintaining normal glucose levels. The development of diabetes type 2, the authors argue, requires a failure of both the islet-cell system and this brain-centered system for regulating blood sugar levels .

    cont...
    merylg, Valentijn, Bob and 1 other person like this.
  2. Valentijn

    Valentijn Activity Level: 3

    Messages:
    6,250
    Likes:
    8,905
    Amersfoort, Netherlands
    It's fascinating how Type II diabetes is sold as being almost entirely based on lifestyle choices.

    Yet there's so much research showing that if you have a certain dysfunction or SNP (and/or a virus to trigger it), you're basically screwed no matter what you do.
    Nielk, merylg and aimossy like this.
  3. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

    Messages:
    7,183
    Likes:
    11,242
    Logan, Queensland, Australia
    I read research in about 1993 that showed a strong link to brain in diabetes. Dysfunctional liver stuffs up the hypothalamus, and poor regulation of fat by the liver is tied to type 2 diabetes. All these systems are connected. ME also has problems with both liver metabolism and hypothalamic metabolism.
    merylg and aimossy like this.
  4. heapsreal

    heapsreal iherb 10% discount code OPA989,

    Messages:
    7,219
    Likes:
    4,521
    australia (brisbane)
    I think the reason behind using cycloset(quick acting bromocriptine) a dopamine agonist is its function on the hypothalamus, possibly fixing/adjusting cortisol/circadian rthym and improving insulin sensitivity.
    Wow thats alot in 2 sentances??

    Interesting mentioning fat metabolism in the liver as a recent article i posted on here showed how australian scientist proved howe metformin improved insulin sensitivity, which was through fat metabolism in the liver.

    I think its showing that most illnesses require a multi pronged attack.
  5. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

    Messages:
    7,183
    Likes:
    11,242
    Logan, Queensland, Australia
    [quote="heapsreal, post: 403020, member: 187"Interesting mentioning fat metabolism in the liver as a recent article i posted on here showed how australian scientist proved howe metformin improved insulin sensitivity, which was through fat metabolism in the liver.[/quote]

    Yes, I am wondering if Metformin can treat ME. I think it might indicate mulitple targets, but I think it has more to do with the observation that complicated as-yet-not-understood diseases are often multi-systemic. Isolate and test, reductionist science, has limited value in complex systemic disease.
  6. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,318
    Likes:
    3,553
    Midwest USA
    Metformin raised my liver enzymes so I ended up stopping it. It also didn't do much for lowering my blood sugar either which was a big disappointment (and a surprise!). I was really hopeful about Cycloset as well but the side effects were intolerable. Whatever is going on in these systems, it seems (at least in me!) to be very resistant to intervention!
  7. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

    Messages:
    7,183
    Likes:
    11,242
    Logan, Queensland, Australia
    Well, treating ME is often like swinging a sledgehammer in a china shop to find the one plate that rings true when you break it.
    Ema and Helen like this.

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page