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How To Make Your Own Nasal Spray For Sinus Congestion/Sinusitis + Save $$$$

Discussion in 'General Treatment' started by Lotus97, Jan 19, 2013.

  1. Lotus97

    Lotus97 Senior Member

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    I've been making my own saline nasal spray with Xylitol and grapefruit seed extract and it seems to work just as good as the ones you buy. The best bottles to use are Xclear xylitol nasal spray, Nutribiotic GSE spray, or Source Naturals Colloidal Silver nasal spray. Xclear and Source Naturals also have spray bottles for the mouth so make sure not to buy that by accident.

    Before I share the recipe there is a warning for anyone using a neti pot or making your own nasal spray. You MUST use distilled water or boil the water before using it. If you're adding grapefruit seed extract to your nasal spray then probably don't need to take this precaution, but I'm not sure.

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/03/rare-infection-prompts-neti-pot-warning/

    The recipe I found at this site. Make sure to read the instructions included below the recipe.
    http://www.quanta-gaia.org/health/coldsAndFlu.html

    Water 1 cup (8 fl. oz.) 237 ml
    Salt ¼ – ½ level teaspoon † 1.25 – 2.5 ml †
    Xylitol 1 level tablespoon (3 tsp.) 15 ml
    GSE 4 drops NutriBiotic®
    Grapefruit Seed Extract
    Baking soda A pinch or two (optional)

    Instructions: First, wash your hands with soap and water. Mix ingredients using warm (not hot) water. This helps to dissolve ingredients and, when used as a wash, is comforting. Stir mixture occasionally until the ingredients dissolve completely. Water should be non-chlorinated, filtered or distilled.
    Salt is both soothing and therapeutic (in the proper concentration). Too little or too much salt will cause the water to “burn” or irritate your nasal passages and sinuses. Pickling salt, which is usually pure salt, is preferable to regular table salt. Table salt usually has undesirable additives (e.g. iodine and flow enhancers). And additives make it more dilute (per volume) thus throwing off the saline concentration of the formula. Do not use a salt substitute! You want real salt (i.e. sodium chloride, NaCl). Be sure your pickling salt is pure salt and does not contain “alum” or aluminum! Morton Canning & Pickling Salt is pure salt.
    †: For a 0.9% isotonic saline solution, the amount normally found in bodily fluids, use 1/3 teaspoon (approx. ¼ heaping teaspoon, or 1.85 ml) of salt. Anything less than this is hypotonic, anything greater is hypertonic. Some research suggests a hypertonic solution may be best when combating a runny nose (as it would have a drying effect), so you might want to go to the higher end of the salt range. You may also want to add a pinch or two of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) to help buffer the solution. A hypotonic solution, however, would tend to be moisturizing (i.e. the lower end of the salt range), and may be what you want in a nasal spray for general prophylactic use. Any amount of salt within the range indicated shouldn’t be irritating to the nasal passages/sinuses of most people.
    Note: “Neti pot salt” (or “aromatic salt”) is just a marketing gimmick to sell salt at a higher price. It usually has some essential oils added, which might have some therapeutic value, or which some people may find pleasing. However it should be viewed as a luxury at a premium price, with relatively little practical value. Use it if you wish, but pickling salt is usually just as pure and free of additives, is widely available, and generally inexpensive.
    Xylitol. While the xylitol is optional, it helps to wash away germs and pollutants in your sinuses, and makes it difficult for germs to colonize or re-establish themselves.
    GSE. The GSE is useful to attack germs and acts as a preservative. Without GSE, use formula within a few days or discard. If mixing for immediate use in a neti pot, the GSE may be omitted without much consequence; its primary purpose is as a preservative for a nasal spray. If you have liquid NutriBiotic GSE, add 4 drops. Other brands may have different sized drops or potencies, so adjust as needed. NutriBiotic has fairly small drops and is 33% Citricidal. Some GSE brands are triple strength, or 100% Citricidal. Too much GSE will “burn” or irritate your nasal passages and sinuses.
    Baking soda (sodium bicarbonate). Baking soda is optional. It may be useful as a buffering agent when using a hypertonic saline solution.
    SickOfSickness likes this.
  2. Sallysblooms

    Sallysblooms P.O.T.S. now SO MUCH BETTER!

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    What is the reason you don't just buy it since it is sterile?
  3. Sushi

    Sushi Moderator and Senior Member Albuquerque

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    Lotus97

    That is the recipe I use, though sometimes I substitute something like nystatin for the grapefruit seed extract.

    Sally, I make it because it costs a fraction of what it would to buy it. Since most of it is water, you are paying a lot for distilled water.

    Sushi
  4. Lotus97

    Lotus97 Senior Member

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    The grapefruit seed extract will kill any bacteria so it should be sterile.
  5. Little Bluestem

    Little Bluestem Senescent on the Illinois prairie, USA

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    Could the xylitol make it difficult for helpful bacteria to recolonize?

    I accidentally bought some non-iodized table salt. I used it to make my neti pot solution. It really burned. That must have been caused by flow enhancers.
  6. SickOfSickness

    SickOfSickness Senior Member

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    Some dollar stores have nasal spray. I want a prescription steroid spray and I can't tolerate most brands. I can't afford the one I like.
  7. taniaaust1

    taniaaust1 Senior Member

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    Make sure u arent allergic to grapeseed extract before using it up nose. Grapeseed is a preservative? used in many natural skin care things to which many react too. It gives me a rash so I certainly wouldnt want to use it in my nose.
  8. Lotus97

    Lotus97 Senior Member

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    That's a good point about the xylitol. I'm not sure. I'm also concerned about the grapefruit seed extract killing the helpful bacteria/probiotics. Someone mentioned using Nystatin instead of GSE which would just kill the candida/fungal infection if that's what's causing sinus problems.
    I find that plain sea salt causes my nose to burn so I use a very small amount. There weren't any flow enhancers listed on the ingredients though.
  9. Lotus97

    Lotus97 Senior Member

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    Colloidal Silver, olive leaf extract, or oregano oil could be used instead. Goldenseal might be another option, but I'm not sure how strong its antibacterial properties are. It would have to be a liquid extract because even a very fine powder can clog the tubes in the spray bottle.
  10. Little Bluestem

    Little Bluestem Senescent on the Illinois prairie, USA

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    I found sea salt uncomfortable, but tolerable and it is expensive for salt. I use canning and pickling salt.
  11. Lotus97

    Lotus97 Senior Member

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    Another thing to watch out for if you're buying nasal spray is that a lot companies including supplement manufacturers like Thorne put Benzalkonium chloride in their product which can cause rebound nasal congestion (a return in symptoms) after a period of time.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7553241
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10566570
  12. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    I have experimented with snorting dozens of supplements into my nasal cavities via a drinking straw, in order to clear my inflammatory sinusitis and nasal congestion, and found the following work well:

    Sinusitis and Nasal Congestion Intranasal Supplements:

    Germanium sesquioxide 20 mg powder snorted intranasally clears sinuses very well.​
    Reishi powder 50 mg, snorted into nasal cavities.​
    Arginine powder 100 mg, snorted into nasal cavities.​
    Beconase (beclometasone dipropionate) 8 sprays helps.​
    N-acetyl-l-cysteine spray (NAC in a solution of 50 mg of NAC in 10 ml water) helps.​

    Don't snort anything that is even slightly acidic (tart to the taste), or it will sting like hell in the nose. The following oral supplements seem to work pretty well for sinusitis and nasal congestion:

    Sinusitis and Nasal Congestion Oral Supplements:

    N-acetylglucosamine 1000 mg.​
    Horsetail herb 600 mg.​
    Saccharomyces boulardii clears the nose and sinuses within hours, probably due to its promotion of secretary IgA at the mucous membranes.​
    Bacterial probiotics have similar efficacy to Saccharomyces boulardii (though perhaps slightly less potent).​
    Magnesium malate appears to be a good treatment for sinusitis.​
    Vitamin A 25,000 IU.​
    Little Bluestem and Lotus97 like this.
  13. Lotus97

    Lotus97 Senior Member

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    I read about someone mixing sodium ascorbate with their nasal spray. Sodium ascorbate is a buffered form of vitamin C (not to be confused with ascorbic acid:eek:). You can also make your own sodium ascorbate by mixing ascorbic acid with baking soda. I haven't tried this myself...anyone want to go first?:whistle:
  14. Lotus97

    Lotus97 Senior Member

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    I think I'm having the same problem and my dad who uses sea salt in his neti pot also said too much bothers him. I also tried putting a liquid extract of spilanthes in my nasal spray and that seemed to burn. Maybe I put too much. And it might have been the alcohol and not the spilanthes that caused the problem.

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