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How To Correct A Misdiagnosis On My Medical Records

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS Discussion' started by golden, Jan 1, 2014.

  1. golden

    golden Senior Member

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    Misdiagnosis is rife.

    It will no doubt be very common amongst the CFS community.

    In fact for many, CFS will be a Misdiagnosis.

    https://theconversation.com/the-hidden-problem-of-medical-misdiagnosis-and-how-to-fix-it-14662


    I cant see the practical channels to follow in learning about how to correct a Misdiagnosis.

    Has anybody done this?

    Doew anyone know how to do this?

    Are there any specific charities set up to deal with this?

    " In a recent address
    to the Hospital Alliance for Research Collaboration in Sydney, I pointed out that part of the problem is that there’s no consensus definition on what diagnostic error actually is.

    There are two other major impediments. The tools we now use to monitor patient safety don’t detect diagnostic errors, and there’s a serious ownership issue in that no one seems willing to take responsibility for the problem. It seems that diagnostic errors fall into our collective blind spot."

    The main problem is that medics will think that whats on a patients history is accurate and most likely the correct diagnoses.

    They therefore fail to look with a 'fresh pair of eyes'.

    This leads to error upon and and sometimes death.




    Golden :)
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2014
  2. CFS_for_19_years

    CFS_for_19_years Senior Member

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    It's possible that you could add your own notes to your medical record, if the organization, clinic or doctor will allow you to, using something known as an "Addendum." Here's how it works:

    1. You see an error in your medical record. Let's use an example of someone stating you had a blood pressure reading of 40/20 (you'd be dead).
    2. You ask the medical records department if they have a protocol for making your own statement and having it added to your medical chart. If you get a representative who sounds clueless, ask to speak with the supervisor of the medical records department.
    3. Prepare your statement at home. In this case you would say, "A blood pressure of 40/20 is incompatible with life." If you disagree with a diagnosis, you will need to say point by point why you disagree. Cite sources of where you get your information to support your opinion.
    4. Give your statement to the medical records department. You could send it by certified mail or deliver it in person to the supervisor of medical records.
    5. Follow up to see that it has been added.

    At some time in the future you might get an accurate diagnosis by a different doctor. You could then have those medical records copied and added as an Addendum.
    golden likes this.
  3. ukxmrv

    ukxmrv Senior Member

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    I'm not aware of any work done by charities in the UK to correct medical records.

    There is a patients association but they appear pretty toothless. http://www.patients-association.com/Default.aspx?tabid=41

    Some time ago a ME patient was going to court to get something changed on her medical records but although there was publicity in the news at the time I never heard what the outcome was.

    In my own case I discussed it with the head administrator of my GP practise and then with my PCT. I have managed to get things removed that way. This was due to an ongoing legal case I had that involved lawyers looking through my medical records.
    golden likes this.
  4. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6

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    I sent my GP a sizeable document detailing all the corrections that needed to be made, but all they will do is add my document to the wad. So, as doctors tend to trust other doctors rather than patients, and tend to be in a hurry due to short appointment slots, they will tend to skip reading your stuff and go straight to what docs have written. The whole system is so primitive and archaic.

    I think that more and more records are going online and at least some surgeries allow patients to make their own corrections.

    There is at least one other thread on errors in medical records, I think, and it may contain useful info - try searching the site for 'medical records'.
    golden likes this.
  5. golden

    golden Senior Member

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    I can't find that thread. I will try again later.

    I think it is UK law to allow the patient correction upon any page of notes in which it occurs.

    I will try to get specifics on this.

    I have not done this myself yet. But the lack of interest shown my management and Doctors is startling and bad medical practice.

    Granny (and retired Scientist) arrested for wanting her medical notes.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/a...gleswade-GP-surgery-asking-medical-notes.html

    Golden
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2014
  6. CFS_for_19_years

    CFS_for_19_years Senior Member

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    As I understand it, what's already written in your medical record can't be changed. So if someone mistakenly writes down a pulse of 20, it stays there. An Addendum that you write can point out the error, but it cannot get rid of the error.

    As a laboratory manager I saw how a large organization handled mislabeled samples. If John Doe's blood gets Jane Smith's label, then an Addendum goes into Jane Smith's chart that the sample drawn on a particular date is not her blood and the results need to be ignored. This is a truly rare occurrence, but I saw it happen when I supervised a scatter-brained employee. I was the one who had to straighten it out.
    golden and alex3619 like this.
  7. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6

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    There's this page (to which you have contributed)

    and this one

    and this one about the US.

    Shocking about the woman arrested. I checked with a BBC site, as the Daily Mail are notorious for scare stories and 'urban myths' and it does seem to be true.
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2014
  8. golden

    golden Senior Member

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    Thanks Me Sci.

    I do recall the thread to which I contributed (started). But that was really asking for a special PR forum dedicated to the legal/medical aspects.

    It doesn't really contain any 'How To' practicality. And specific points of law. Which I think is much needed.

    I will look at the links you provided.

    Golden .
  9. golden

    golden Senior Member

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  10. SickOfSickness

    SickOfSickness Senior Member

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    I don't have sources at the moment but have read of negative experiences in the U.S. where patients tried to correct records. I believe a few got fired as patients. For others the docs wrote new notes about how they were too concerned with the records and one of those patients who knows too much, etc. This gets the attention of future docs and they judge you for it I believe :( .
    golden likes this.

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