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How sinus infections can contribute/cause ulcerative colitis

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Waverunner, Sep 16, 2011.

  1. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    How sinus infections can contribute to/cause ulcerative colitis

    A very interesting study. The basic principle behind it, is, that during chronic and normal sinus infections we swallow down mucus/bacteria/toxins/antigens. When these reach our intestines they cause inflammation, increased intestinal permeability and damage over time. Therefor they can highly contribute to ulcerative colitis.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC555745/

    A murine model of ulcerative colitis: induced with sinusitis-derived superantigen and food allergen

    Our knowledge about the etiology of ulcerative colitis is still limited. Although some theories about its origins have been advanced, such as genetic predisposition, autoimmune disorders, infection, and so on [23,24], the precise pathogenesis needs to be further understood. In clinical practice, we noted a close association between CS and UC in some patients and their UC was significantly improved after having removed sinus pathology (data not shown). The results of animal experiments verified our speculation: superantigen SEB from sinusitis cooperated with ingested antigen to induce intestinal sensitization. Challenge with the obligate antigen initiated colonic mucosal inflammation as well as the clinical symptom diarrhea. Book DT et al [25] also noted the same phenomenon and suggested that IBD was more prevalent in those people with chronic sinusitis than in other populations.
    Rhinosinuses are empty cavities lined with mucosa. The anatomic feature, only having a small ostium, makes them very easily to be blocked and subsequently infected. Infection with S. aureus in sinuses is frequently encountered [4,5]. Thus, chronically infected sinuses may be a source of SEB that is released to nasal cavity frequently. A mucus blanket on the surface of nasal mucosa naturally traps small particles from air and the secretions from sinuses and removes them subsequently. Since the direction of the locomotion of the mucus blanket is backward, people sometimes swallow the secretions into the gastrointestinal tract (e.g., during sleep).
    There are many toxic substances in the secretions from chronic sinusitis. SEB is one that has been well characterized. The unique feature of SEB is that it can down regulate intestinal barrier function [6,13], activate T lymphocytes without the help from antigen presenting cells to activate T cells. Superantigens bind directly to MHC class II molecules and to a subset of T-cell receptor (TCR) V? chains [26,27]. Unlike conventional antigens, superantigens do not require processing by antigen-presenting cells to activate immune cells [31]. Administration of superantigen results in initial selective expansion of T cells that bear specific V? chains that recognize the superantigen, followed by their deletion [29]. Another unique feature of superantigen is that it mutes T suppression cell function and promotes Th1/Th2 skewing [30]. It primes an environment to develop sensitization in local tissue. The results in the present animal experiments are consistent with previous studies. Mice treated with SEB-containing SWF and OVA developed intestinal sensitization, but not in those mice treated with only OVA, or SEB-depleted SWF plus OVA. This finding demonstrates that SEB plays a crucial role in the sensitization of the intestinal mucosa to luminal antigen in these mice. Louini D et al [31] reported that SEB also directly sensitized skin and caused Th2 pattern inflammation in the local skin.
     
  2. Enid

    Enid Senior Member

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    Very interesting findings - thanks Waverunner- both (related) conditions are certainly experienced by us here.
     
  3. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    Yes, I found it very interesting too. I find it fascinating that mucus from sinuses can cause so much trouble. Who thinks about a stuffed nose when you have IBD.
     
  4. mellster

    mellster Marco

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    Great find - my issue is though that everytime I go to get examined for sinus infections they find nothing though I clearly have symptoms. Must be some obscure pathogens ;)
     
  5. xchocoholic

    xchocoholic Senior Member

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    Thanks. I.ve long suspected that I have candida in my sinuses ... This should motivate me to treat more often . X
     
  6. Nielk

    Nielk

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    This is amazing.

    I always had problems with my sinuses since childhood. I had a deviated septum and suffered constantly with sinus infections.
    At age 15, I developed Crohn's disease which is the same as Ulcerative Colitis except it involves the Ileum instead of the large intestines. At age 23 I had an operation to "fix" my deviated septum. It only helped me partially. I still had sinus problems but not so many full blown infections. At age 31, my Crohn's went into remission.
    I still struggle a lot with sinus problems and headaches. At age 47, I developed ME/CFS.
    Is there a possible connection between sinus problems and ME?
     
  7. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    It's so hard to make definitive statements about CFS but sinus infections and chronic mucus production were one of the first symptoms I had before all the other problems kicked in. Nielk and mellster, I ask myself all the time if CFS is nothing but a chronic reinfection with viruses or bacteria that can't be cleared from the body and then start to wear down our immune system till we get all kinds of other problems and coinfections. I would give everything to know what happens if someone gets a chronic cold and how the body adapts to it.
     
  8. mellster

    mellster Marco

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    Well, I don't have many sinus symptoms apart from congestion which comes and goes and the swabs have not had any results but they only test for strep and candida. And while I don't have UC, I have IBS.
     
  9. Sushi

    Sushi Moderator and Senior Member Albuquerque

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    And, just as in interesting footnote, by treating a gut infection, my chronic sinus infections disappeared!

    Sushi
     
  10. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    Hi Sushi,

    how were you treating the gut infection? Rifaximin?
     
  11. Dufresne

    Dufresne almost there...

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    Klinghardt has recently stated that the majority of his ME/CFS patients have either coagulase negative staph, or lungworm. His focus on staph seems to be the result of his interest in Shoemaker's work. Apparently the infection resides in the nasal cavities of 30% of the general population and doesn't have too much trouble making its way into the brain, specifically the hypothalamus. You can get tested for it through Esoterix Labs in San Antonio for 50 or 75 dollars. I'm not sure but I think the lab even suggests the type of antibiotic to combat it with.
     
  12. mellster

    mellster Marco

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    Does Coagulase negative staph mean that normal staph swap tests don't detect it? Also lungworm should produce significant symptoms (cough with phlegm) and increased eosinophils.
     
  13. Sushi

    Sushi Moderator and Senior Member Albuquerque

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    Yes, it was an anaerobic infection, and rifaximin seems to have worked.

    Best,
    Sushi
     

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