The 12th Invest in ME Conference, Part 1
OverTheHills presents the first article in a series of three about the recent 12th Invest In ME international Conference (IIMEC12) in London.
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HMBG1 - Putting the brakes on inflammation

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Marco, Sep 4, 2015.

  1. Marco

    Marco Grrrrrrr!

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    Near Cognac, France
    Acute inflammation in response to infection, injury etc is 'a good thing'. Chronic inflammation - not so good.

    HMGB1 (high mobility group box 1) protein is interesting. It appears to be a master regulator of the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, can also be induced by psychological stress and acts directly on microglia. It acts as the 'accelerator' for inflammation.

    So what is the brake? Mung beans and green tea? - Really?

    Turn Off the Cytokine Switch

    http://www.prohealth.com/library/showarticle.cfm?libid=20902
     
    rosie26 likes this.
  2. rosie26

    rosie26 Senior Member

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    Thanks Marco. This is really interesting. I thought there was something significant in this. Whenever I eat mung beans my appetite increases and I feel a good surge of energy or that 'feel good factor'. I mainly have decreased appetite with my ME. I think this will be on my weekly shopping list permanently now :D As for the green tea - I still can't abide the taste of it, even after many attempts over the years.
     
  3. Thinktank

    Thinktank Senior Member

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    rosie26 likes this.
  4. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    For anyone trying green tea, note that EGCG in green tea has an anti-folate action: EGCG inhibits the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), which converts dihydrofolate and folic acid into tetrahydrofolate. So you may want to supplement with active folate (L-methylfolate) if you take a lot of EGCG.

    DHFR also recycles BH2 back to BH4 (tetrahydrobiopterin).

     
  5. Jesse2233

    Jesse2233 Senior Member

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    Has anyone else tried this?
     
    Little Bluestem likes this.

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