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Help with Thyroid Test Results Please

Discussion in 'Thyroid Dysfunction' started by Mya Symons, Sep 23, 2015.

  1. Mya Symons

    Mya Symons Mya Symons

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    These are my test results

    Thyroid Panel With TSH TSH 2.950 (Reference Range: uIU/mL 0.450 - 4.500)

    Thyroxine (T4) 9.7 ug/dL (Reference Range: 4.5 - 12.0)

    T3 Uptake 33 % (Reference Range: 24 - 39)

    Free Thyroxine Index 3.2 (Reference Range: 1.2 - 4.9)

    Thyroxine (T4) Free, Direct, S T4, Free(Direct) 1.68 ng/dL (Reference Range 0.82 - 1.77)

    Antithyroglobulin Ab Thyroglobulin, Antibody 3.0 High IU/mL (Reference Range: 0.0 - 0.9)
    Please Note: Low positive Thyroglobulin antibodies are seen in a portion of the asymptomatic populations. Antithyroglobulin antibodies measured by Beckman Coulter Methodology

    Reverse T3, Serum 20.5 ng/dL (Reference Range: 9.2 - 24.1)

    Thyroid Peroxidase (TPO) Ab 13 IU/mL (Reference Range: 0 - 34)

    Triiodothyronine,Free,Serum 2.4 pg/mL (Reference Range: 2.0 - 4.4)

    I've been taking l-selenomethionine and my TPO Antibodies went down from around 500 to 13! Wow. It really works! I'm confused about the TSH. It went from almost 0 to 2.9. Not sure what is going on there. I am not doing anything different or taking a different dose of synthroid so I assume another part of my thyroid was destroyed by my immune system in some way.

    My question is the high amount on the antithyroglobulin antibodies. I don't even know what that is. I got the test through an online lab and it was included with the TPO antibody test. I can't really get a clear description on this type of antibody through the internet. Does anyone know if it is something to worry about? All I get is it is some autoimmune reaction to a protein in the thyroid. The "please note" message under the results seems to indicate my positive results are on the low end. I think that is what they are implying. Does anyone else here have these antibodies? Do you know what it means?
     
  2. drob31

    drob31 Senior Member

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    https://www.hashimotoshealing.com/understanding-hashimotos-antibodies/


    I'm not sure how 3.0 compares to a higher value based on the range.
     
  3. Mya Symons

    Mya Symons Mya Symons

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  4. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

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    The testing methodology for TgAb changed a couple of years ago so you have to be careful that you are comparing apples to apples. For the Beckman Coulter methodology, that is the correct range.

    So you have some Tg antibodies. The pathological significance of this is unknown though it can indicate Hashi's (which you already know you have). Some healthy people also have Tg Abs. I don't know of any way to lower it at this time so I would not worry about it. The people who need to worry about it are those who don't have a thyroid due to cancer and are using it and thyroglobulin together to monitor for a recurrence of cancer.

    This is my non-medical opinion based on my own experiences with thyroid treatment.

    Most non-medicated people feel best with their TSH between 1-2. On thyroid meds, the TSH often falls much lower, sometimes even below the reference range. This does not equate to hyperthyroidism or signify increased risks to bones or heart health. Many doctors don't even bother with the TSH once a patient is medicated because it is of limited use in monitoring thyroid levels. Symptoms and free thyroid hormone levels are much more important in determining if a patient is properly medicated.

    So, your FT4 is at the top of the range, your FT3 is at the bottom of the range, and your RT3 is high in range. This says to me that you are converting T4 poorly. Instead of getting FT3, the active thyroid hormone, you are getting an abundance of RT3 which does nothing to relieve hypothyroid symptoms.

    Raising a T4 only med like Synthroid is unlikely to help improve this situation. The last thing you would want is for your FT4 to go up any higher...your RT3 would likely just go up and you are still left functionally hypothyroid.

    If it were me, I would ask my doctor about switching to a T4/T3 containing med like Armour or Naturethroid or adding Cytomel (T3) to your current regime. You will probably need to lower your T4 as you add in the T3.

    I would also consider working on your liver health since a lot of thyroid conversion is dependent on solid liver function.

    Hope this is helpful.
     
    Wayne, Mackee, picante and 1 other person like this.
  5. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

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    Someone share with me some useful links about atoimmune thyroiditis and thyroid physiology which I didn't have the time to study yet, so perhaps we could study them together:

    @picante
     
  6. picante

    picante Senior Member

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    This is how I understand it, too. The function of reverse T3 is to downregulate the metabolism in times of illness and starvation.
    http://blog.zrtlab.com/clearing-up-...iodinases-and-thyroid-hormone-bioavailability
    A normal ratio of T3/RT3 would be like a gentle brake so you don't speed up out of control; your ratio is more like skid marks on the pavement.

    When I was on dessicated pig thyroid about 8 years ago, I had my RT3 tested for the first time: my result was 207 pg/mL, almost exactly what yours is if you convert ng/dL to pg/mL.

    At that time, the Yahoo T3 forum had a formula for calculating the ratio (which involved moving some decimal points around, since different labs were using different units). A minimum healthy ratio was said to be 20:1. Mine was 14.9 by that method.

    My FT3 was higher than yours. By the same method, your ratio is 11.7. Dr. Wilson, Dr. Lowe, and several others have said that this is the best method we have of gauging cellular thyroid metabolism.

    Nobody feels very good with their FT3 at the low end of the range, btw.
     
  7. picante

    picante Senior Member

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    I think they're saying that the critical thing happening when antibodies start appearing is too much hydrogen peroxide exposure:
    From Izzy's first diagram:
    I know high H2O2 has been a concern of yours for quite a while, @Gondwanaland. (And I can't remember which antioxidant process is involved, at the moment.) This doesn't really explain why you have high Tg antibodies, while I have high TPO antibodies. Or why @Mya Symons had high TPO antibodies, and now has high Tg antibodies. (That's a real mystery! Have you had the Tg antibodies measured before now?)

    I'm not sure selenomethionine had much to do with reducing my TPO antibodies. They came down from 500-something when I started taking T3-only, and were consistently 85-95 for years. Recently they've actually come down to 59! It may be from stopping vitamin D supplementation, which I did at my ND's suggestion because my calcitriol was high.
     
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  8. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

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    One year ago ( @ahmo ) and I listened to a webinar where a pharmacist mentioned this switch in antibodies and that he uses to treat his patients alternating the medication T3 - T4 (is that right @ahmo ?)

    As I said I didn't have the time to study this myself yet, but apparently if you make too much thyroglobulin, the body will send antibodies against it. Then you treat it with _ _ _ _ (?) and the body will start making too much TPO (?), then you have to treat it by using _ _ _ _ (?)
     
  9. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

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  10. ahmo

    ahmo Senior Member

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  11. picante

    picante Senior Member

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    Very intriguing! The plot thickens.
     
  12. Mya Symons

    Mya Symons Mya Symons

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    No, I never had an antithyroglobulin test. I didn't even know it existed and only got it because it was free with the TPO test. I have taken synthroid for years and always had high TPO antibodies. I really do think the l-selenomethionine did work for taking down the TPO antibodies. Nevertheless, it is just a number reduction. I'm still feeling the same.

    Selenium and TPO antibody reduction: http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/thy.2007.0040
     
  13. Mya Symons

    Mya Symons Mya Symons

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    Wow. This sounds like a never ending cycle. I really need to spend some time looking for a naturopath or D.O. who knows about Hashimoto's. I'm moving back to Seattle soon. It will help to be in a big city instead of a small town -- more options.
     
  14. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

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    Here, @picante found something that can be useful for us
     

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