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Has D-Ribose helped you? If so, what other mitochondrial supplements are you taking alongside?

Discussion in 'General Treatment' started by rosie26, Apr 20, 2015.

  1. rosie26

    rosie26 Senior Member

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    Hi, I have found d-ribose helpful and am wondering what next to add. I would be interested to know what other mitochondrial supplements have been helping those who also take d-ribose. It would be great if you could give me the list you take and dose. Also, your opinion on what I should go for next or what helped you a lot. Thanks.
     
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  2. August59

    August59 Daughters High School Graduation

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    I tried it approx. 7 years ago with limited positive results, but it was not cost justified at the time. I was also taking Omega-3(fish oil), Co-Q10 and 10mg of NADH prior to starting and continuously while taking D-Ribose. The effects from NADH were insignificant as well.

    I would consider trying both again as I was the early stages (first 3 years) of the disease during my first trial.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2015
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  3. Ruthie24

    Ruthie24 Senior Member

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    I have found D Ribose helpful recently. When I tried it previously I didn't have much luck with it.

    Currently I'm also taking alpha lipoic acid, CoQ 10, Carnitall, Creatine, Amino Complete, NT Factor, L-Lysine, Taurine, NAC and a bunch of methylation support supplements. I found that once I started taking the NT Factor, I was able to tolerate higher doses of many of these supplements.
     
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  4. helios

    helios

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    I have tried it a couple of times over the years.My summary of it is - it was okay, but not a can't live with out this supplement. I feel it did help me a bit with energy but was not as wonderful as I have heard few others describe it. If it was cheap and more widely available I would have taken it more often. I have a greater mental energy deficit then physical energy deficit though imo.
     
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  5. Gingergrrl

    Gingergrrl Senior Member

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    I tried D Ribose for over a year and it never did anything for me- good or bad.
     
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  6. pogoman

    pogoman Senior Member

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    D-ribose helped me with energy support when I found out I had MTHFR and was starting on the first of the supplements that eventually allowed me to get off prescription pain meds.
    I do not take it except rarely now as the current supplements are working very well.
    For mito support I take B2 riboflavin, coq10, choline/inositol, L-carnitine fumarate all at around 100mg each twice a day.
    Occasionally about once every week or two I take manganese and phosphorus, too much can cause issues.
     
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  7. Gingergrrl

    Gingergrrl Senior Member

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    @pogoman Can you say more re: why you take Inositol and what it does for you? I just learned of it and am curious. Thank you!
     
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  8. sickntired771

    sickntired771

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    I take CoQ10 daily and have tried D-Ribose but don't find either do anything for me. Since CoQ10 is healthy anyway I take it but maybe Ill try more D-Ribose.
     
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  9. pogoman

    pogoman Senior Member

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    I found for me choline worked with carnitine to increase energy and reduce pain.
    Choline supplements commonly have inositol together, as its referred to as unofficiially vitamin B8 and has a role in the mitochondrial ATP process I figured I would also try inositol this time around.
    a correction on the amount, I checked the bottle and its 500mg each for choline and inositol.

    try coq10 along with riboflavin B2 and see if that helps.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2015
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  10. helios

    helios

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    Did you know there are 2 different versions of CoQ10? I think they are ubiquinone and ubiquinol. (I could be wrong)
    My doc put me on it years ago and I thought it helped me a little...but expensive. When I got sick again a decade ago I tired it again but thought it was no good. There is a fair variation in price I found and went for the cheap brand to save money. Later on I read that there is two different processing method for CoQ10 with one producing a superior (and more expensive alas) version. I think it is better because it is absorbed by the body much better.
     
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  11. rosie26

    rosie26 Senior Member

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    Thank you everyone for your replies. I will get back to you all eventually. Appreciate.
     
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  12. Sherpa

    Sherpa Ex-workaholic adrenaline junkie

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    Ribose helps me more than any other supplement for energy. I also taken NT Factor EnergyLipids, CoQ10, L carnitine fumarate, magnesium and B12 Oils
     
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  13. SOC

    SOC Senior Member

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    No supplement seems to make a difference in energy for me except high doses of CoQ10 (1200-1800 mg). It's expensive, but since it's the only thing that makes a difference, I sacrifice other supps to pay for it. Less than 1200 mg of CoQ10 made no noticeable difference for me.
     
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  14. Alea Ishikawa

    Alea Ishikawa

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    D-ribose significantly helped with daily body pain. It tends to make me less of a grump, and perhaps by consequence when I am not in as much pain/grumpy and can concentrate better, I might be able to do slightly more. D-ribose is better than a pain pill for pain and doesn't come with the downside of lowering my brain or intracellular glutathione like aspirin/acetaminophen (tylenol).

    I've heard some people have success with CoQ10 or Reduced CoQ10 (ubiquinone or ubiquinol). L-carnitine fumarate lowered my heart pain, but was not significant enough for me to make a continuous purchase. Acetyl-l-carnitine supposedly helps with brain function, but I'm not sure that's doing anything big for me.



    I had some strange tiny, tiny gains on Cat's Claw/Samento for a little while. But I've had a bulls-eye rash with inadequate treatment, activity on band 39 and 41 on my past/present infection testing for Lyme, and a positive on past infection of babesia. I don't recommend taking any medications/supplements with Cat's Claw/Samento other than d-ribose and anything approved for a Lyme protocol. In general, Cat's Claw/Samento can mess with the "thickness" of your blood and might put you out of commission more than normal.

    If you suspect Lyme, I'd suggest going on a "challenge" for a while and then testing maybe 1-1.5 months after through IgeneX. The co-infections can be tested via a regular lab; I haven't heard anything otherwise.



    I've done some type of methylation protocol for around a year, both Rich's and a variation of Freddd's, with no noticeable gain. Oddly, I take it about every 2-3 days because it significantly lowers my ability otherwise. I plan on stopping once my bottles run out, as I suspect my glutathione will be fine for a while. I might restart again after 6 months.

    I also take fish oil for mood and headaches. Sometimes, caffeine for headaches, concentration, energy (but mind serotonin level). Vitamin D to try to get my lower values up.



    I don't think I've had a noticeable benefit from any other supplementation.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2015
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  15. rosie26

    rosie26 Senior Member

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    I hope ribose helps next time you try. I had very noticeable improvement in the first hour of taking it - pain started to lessen in my hands and I seemed to have a bit more stamina. Also, nausea decreased some. I think if it is not showing any noticeable effect when you take it - I wouldn't continue either. I was in my 11th year of ME when I first began taking ribose, I do wonder if it would have helped me in my first 3 years - it may not have, I don't know. I would be interested to hear how you go if you try it again.
     
  16. rosie26

    rosie26 Senior Member

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    Oh great Ruthie, good to hear ribose is helping now. Thanks for letting me know what you take alongside - it will be helpful to me. Interesting about NT Factor, I will take a good look at that one.
     
  17. sickntired771

    sickntired771

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    which coq10 version is better?
     
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  18. Alea Ishikawa

    Alea Ishikawa

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    It depends. I remember reading the reduced form is better for older folks. But individual mileage may vary.
     
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  19. TigerLilea

    TigerLilea Senior Member

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    I didn't notice any improvement at all when taking d-ribose. :(
     
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  20. dannybex

    dannybex Senior Member

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    The one concern with d-ribose is that it really increases glycation -- not a good thing:

    http://www.townsendletter.com/FebMarch2010/cureNO0210.html

    "D-ribose is a potent glycating agent, being approximately 50 times more active in glycation than is D-glucose (the normal sugar in the blood), with substantial possible physiological effects of such D-ribose mediated glycation.
    D-ribose is a potent glycating agent, being approximately 50 times more active in glycation than is D-glucose (the normal sugar in the blood), with substantial possible physiological effects of such D-ribose mediated glycation."
     
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