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Has anyone tried treating neuromuscular strain for their OI?

Discussion in 'Problems Standing: Orthostatic Intolerance; POTS' started by Sasha, Jul 17, 2015.

  1. Sasha

    Sasha Fine, thank you

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  2. Sushi

    Sushi Moderation Resource Albuquerque

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    Yes. It didn't help OI but did help EDS.
     
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  3. Effi

    Effi Senior Member

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    The idea sounds interesting, but when I hear 'physical therapy' I instantly think PEM. Even what we over here call manual therapy (a kind of medical massage) is too much for me. It would have to be a very knowledgeable PT. And I think those are very hard to find...

    @Sushi could you say what your physical therapy consisted of, just to get an idea?
     
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  4. Sushi

    Sushi Moderation Resource Albuquerque

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    Nothing that would give me PEM. Basically, I lie on a table and the physical therapist (or, lately the osteopath) manipulates my body, sometimes using massage as well. The effort on my part is resisting his pressures, which in different manipulations, is pulsed. This could be too much for some but it isn't at all aerobic and doesn't bother me.

    Example: I am lying on my stomach to one side of the table with my legs bent and hanging off. He is supporting my legs and pushes down on them in a specific manner while I try to push up. This is of course for a condition that is individual to me, but gives an idea of the type of effort involved.
     
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  5. Effi

    Effi Senior Member

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  6. Sasha

    Sasha Fine, thank you

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    I had the impression it was some sort of effortless thing where someone manipulates your body to stretch your nerves, but I don't know that I have that right.

    But the point of doing it is that not having the nerves sliding freely is producing PEM, so there's probably some PEM involved in fixing it. Dunno.
     
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  7. Effi

    Effi Senior Member

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    I am just wondering how many physiotherapists would know how to do this correctly... Is this nerves situation (pardon my vague wording) general knowledge for them, or is it something that would just give us the same blank stare most medical professionals give us when we come up with the next novel idea? (I like the idea though, it sounds like there could be something in it. But it could just as well be a trainwreck if not executed well.)
     
  8. Sasha

    Sasha Fine, thank you

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    I don't know, @Effi! :)
     
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  9. Scarecrow

    Scarecrow Revolting Peasant

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    I've just caught up with the webinair.

    I'm wondering now if this is the phenomenon that leads to the PEM I feel after osteopathic / Perrin treatment. I've always attributed it to lymphatic massage but perhaps it's the neuromuscular strain or a combination of the two.
     
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