Invest in ME Conference 12: First Class in Every Way
OverTheHills wraps up our series of articles on this year's 12th Invest in ME International Conference (IIMEC12) in London with some reflections on her experience as a patient attending the conference for the first time.
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Gut Microbiota, Bacterial Translocation, and Interactions with Diet

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by hixxy, Nov 25, 2016.

  1. hixxy

    hixxy Senior Member

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    Psychother Psychosom. 2016 Nov 25;86(1):31-46. [Epub ahead of print]

    Gut Microbiota, Bacterial Translocation, and Interactions with Diet: Pathophysiological Links between Major Depressive Disorder and Non-Communicable Medical Comorbidities

    Slyepchenko A, Maes M, Jacka FN, Köhler CA, Barichello T, McIntyre RS, Berk M, Grande I, Foster JA, Vieta E, Carvalho AF.

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND:
    Persistent low-grade immune-inflammatory processes, oxidative and nitrosative stress (O&NS), and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation are integral to the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). The microbiome, intestinal compositional changes, and resultant bacterial translocation add a new element to the bidirectional interactions of the gut-brain axis; new evidence implicates these pathways in the patho-aetiology of MDD. In addition, abnormalities in the gut-brain axis are associated with several chronic non-communicable disorders, which frequently co-occur in individuals with MDD, including but not limited to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), obesity, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).

    METHODS:
    We searched the PubMed/MEDLINE database up until May 1, 2016 for studies which investigated intestinal dysbiosis and bacterial translocation (the 'leaky gut') in the pathophysiology of MDD and co-occurring somatic comorbidities with an emphasis on IBS, CFS, obesity, and T2DM.

    RESULTS:
    The composition of the gut microbiota is influenced by several genetic and environmental factors (e.g. diet). Several lines of evidence indicate that gut-microbiota-diet interactions play a significant pathophysiological role in MDD and related medical comorbidities. Gut dysbiosis and the leaky gut may influence several pathways implicated in the biology of MDD, including but not limited to immune activation, O&NS, and neuroplasticity cascades. However, methodological inconsistencies and limitations limit comparisons across studies.

    CONCLUSIONS:
    Intestinal dysbiosis and the leaky gut may constitute a key pathophysiological link between MDD and its medical comorbidities. This emerging literature opens relevant preventative and therapeutic perspectives.

    © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.
    PMID: 27884012
    DOI: 10.1159/000448957

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27884012
     
  2. trishrhymes

    trishrhymes Senior Member

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    Maybe we're at last reaching the stage where psychiatry as an empire building growth area that grabs anything 'medically unexplained' and clings on to it for itself are at last coming to an end.

    As each 'psychiatric' condition gets a medical explanation, psychiatry can be allowed to wither away like phrenology, astrology and reading the tea leaves.

    Then we can set up a special CBT program for the psychiatrists who are having trouble letting go of their false illness beliefs.

    After that we can retire CBT therapists too, and simply provide a few good wise folk to listen to us when life throws us a curve ball and we temporarily can't cope.

    Edit. Sorry, this comment is way off topic.
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2016
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  3. IThinkImTurningJapanese

    IThinkImTurningJapanese Moderator

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    No, it's not off topic.

    And a quick reading of your blog is one of the most beautiful explanations of the problem I have ever encountered.

    One of the problems with positioning CBT as a "treatment" for ME/CFS is the aversion to psychiatric treatment that is inevitable for sufferers of ME/CFS. As if denying us proper physical care were not enough, now we're being conditioned to willingly reject psychological care as well.

    One of your MP's, I don't remember his name, so accurately pointed out to those dismissing ME as some sort of mental problem, that anyone suffering from a physical illness can benefit from the coping strategies of CBT.

    This illness is clearly not a psychiatric problem, and at the same time we must insist on help coping with such severe hardship.
     
  4. Daffodil

    Daffodil Senior Member

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    my doc says my brain isn't really making serotonin. I think this has something to do with the quinolinic acid / tryptophan / something? ...
     
  5. Valentijn

    Valentijn Senior Member

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    But there's no indication that even coping-based CBT is helpful for ME patients. All of the CBT research is in regards to teaching patients to ignore symptoms.

    If there's any need for coping-based CBT in some ME patients, it isn't going to be any different than the form offered for any other patients, and wouldn't require a special ME service. And it isn't going to be needed with any increased frequency, which again makes it something which is pretty useless to specifically target at ME patients.
     
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  6. trishrhymes

    trishrhymes Senior Member

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    Thank you.
     
  7. IThinkImTurningJapanese

    IThinkImTurningJapanese Moderator

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    Of course there is, Here is one example

    As I said,
    And your response,
    Please reread what I said,
    I also am offended by the suggestion that CBT is a treatment for ME/CFS.

    It shows such ignorance of the etiology of this disease.
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2016
  8. Valentijn

    Valentijn Senior Member

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    That doesn't involve ME patients, and it's not research. Just a summary of "principles" mostly consisting of someone's opinions and with very few citations.
     

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