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In Brief: The Adrenal Glands and ME
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Gut bacteria and colon cancer

Discussion in 'The Gut: De Meirleir & Maes; H2S; Leaky Gut' started by xchocoholic, Jul 20, 2011.

  1. xchocoholic

    xchocoholic Senior Member

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    I only copied in a few paragraphs but the whole articles is worth reading ...

    http://www.health.am/cr/more/gut-bacteria-could-be-key-indicator-of-colon-cancer-risk/






    So what are proteobacteria ? I haven't found a definition I like just yet ...

    I was wondering if we have certain areas in our digestive tracts (damage or otherwise - diverticuli come to mind here) that are keeping the bad bacteria alive by providing them a safe place to multiply ? This statement from this article indicates that researchers are looking at what comes first ... bad bacteria or damage ?

    In case anyone was paying attention, I appear to have a bacteria fetish. :innocent1: ... tc ... x
  2. redo

    redo Senior Member

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    I really think they might be onto something with gut microbes/colon cancer.

    Proteobacteria is a phylum (broad group) of bacteria. Beneath proteobacteria in the taxonomy you find classes such as gammaproteobacteria.

    Here's a taxonomy for a dog, just for comparison.

    Kingdom: Animalia (all animals in general)
    Phylum: Chordata (not sure)
    Class: Mammalia (mammals...)
    Order: Carnivora (meat eaters)
    Family: Canidae (wolves, foxes, jackals, coyotes, dogs)
    Genus: Canis (dogs)

    Phylum is a group high up in the taxonomy. And proteobacteria is a phylum underneath "bacteria" in the taxonomy.
  3. xchocoholic

    xchocoholic Senior Member

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    Thanks Redo,

    I totally agree with you about a possible link between colon cancer and bacteria. I recently posted an article about a possible connection between celiac disease and commensal bacteria. The latter article is way over my head still tho.

    http://www.celiac.com/articles/779/...-of-Celiac-Disease-By-Roy-S-Jamron/Page1.html

    .


    I've just started down this path so I hope to find more. Btw. do you have this info in your "Its all in the gut .. " thread ? I didn't take the time to look at it that closely ...

    I found this link on proteobacteria. Great detailed info on types. I only copied in a tiny bit of it.

    http://www.earthlife.net/prokaryotes/proteo.html

    Unfortunately, according to this article, there are 1534 species known and I'm not sure which ones they found in the patients with colon cancer. The article on colon cancer above didn't say.

    I'm thinking this may have implications in ME/CFS too. Most, all (?), of us appear to have gut damage which includes leaky gut, etc. In 2004, the parts of my digestive tract that can be seen via endoscopy and colonoscopy showed damage, including diverticuli, celiac, hiatal hernia, GERD, etc .. But as of 2009 ?, post dietary changes, all visible damage was gone. I was told that calming my my digestive tract would allow it to heal but I wonder what role Kefir played in this.

    But who knows what's going on in the areas of our digestive tracts that can't be seen .. or if the parts that were visible had clues that were missed. A diagnosis of celiac disease if often missed because the gastroenterologist didn't take enough samples. Apparently, those endoscopies can be misleading ...

    Low adherence to biopsy guidelines affect celiac diagnosis ...

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110707092437.htm

    I want to look more closely at h pylori to find out what type of bacteria it is and why it causes ulcers. As far as I know right now this is the only bacteria proven to cause serious physical damage to our digestive tracts. Hmmm, other bacteria damage our skin, etc ...

    Why do we use different types of antibiotics ? Why in some instances does it take several doses to kill the bacteria and not others ? I know sinus infections are notorious for needing multiple rounds of antibiotics.

    My CFS/ME started out with a URI that wouldn't go away with repeated antibiotics. In fact, it took me years to stop coughing up green stuff daily if I overexerted myself .... TMI ... lol ... My last CT scan in March showed lung scarring.

    I started out with chronic UTIs too and 21 years later, I still show blood in my urine that responds to taking AZO / with probiotics. Wish I'd known about the AZO sooner. Taking Azo keeps my UTI symptoms under control and it had gotten so bad that I was shopping for Depends ... lol ...

    What role are bacteriophages playing in this ? If we kill the bacteria where these viruses live what happens to the virus within it ? does it move on or die too ? And are there certain bacteria that viruses tend to live in ? We've all heard that certain viruses cause disease but are they looking at where those viruses are residing ? Some bacteria are really hard to kill off ...

    ... tc ... x

    http://www.bacteriamuseum.org/cms/bacteria/bacteriophages-make-bacteria-ill.html
  4. redo

    redo Senior Member

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    Don't have that type of info in the thread no.

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