The power and pitfalls of omics part 2: epigenomics, transcriptomics and ME/CFS
Simon McGrath concludes his blog about the remarkable Prof George Davey Smith's smart ideas for understanding diseases, which may soon be applied to ME/CFS.
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Gulf War Syndrome CoQ10 Trial

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS News' started by Never Give Up, Dec 4, 2014.

  1. Never Give Up

    Never Give Up Collecting improvements, until there's a cure.

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  2. adreno

    adreno PR activist

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    How much are they giving them?
     
  3. Marco

    Marco Grrrrrrr!

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    adreno likes this.
  4. adreno

    adreno PR activist

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    Okay, and it seems 100mg was the most effective.
     
  5. Never Give Up

    Never Give Up Collecting improvements, until there's a cure.

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    "In the study, 46 veterans with the syndrome received a placebo or differing doses of the supplement on a daily basis. Golomb’s group used PharmaNord, a version of coenzyme Q10 made in Denmark.

    The result: 80 percent who got a 100 mg dose of the supplement showed improved physical function. The degree of improvement correlated to how much coenzyme Q10 levels in the blood increased.

    Researchers also saw a lessening of symptoms such as headaches, fatigue after exercise, irritability, recall problems and muscle pain. Of 20 symptoms they chose to study, 19 showed improvement, according to self-assessments by patients, Golomb said.

    The downside: sleeplessness. Coenzyme Q10 charges up cell activity to the point that it can keep people awake if taken near bedtime.

    Presently, coenzyme Q10 is available in most drug stores without a prescription.

    However, Golomb said high-quality versions can be expensive. And less costly variants sometimes contain additives that work against the antioxidant properties."

    Sorry, but the article does not mention what these additives are.
     
    xchocoholic likes this.
  6. Marco

    Marco Grrrrrrr!

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    Can anyone access the full paper?
     
  7. natasa778

    natasa778 Senior Member

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    Last edited: Dec 9, 2014
  8. natasa778

    natasa778 Senior Member

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    Interesting slide on p15

    Dose Consideration
    Nonmonotonic.
    This is the norm for antioxidants: many are prooxidant at higher doses. BUT point of
    transition varies.
    This is common for nutrients: Supplement trials often err by thinking if some is good, more is
    better*

    *Morris MC, Tangney CC. A potential design flaw ofr andomized trials of vitamin supplements. JAMA
    2011;305:1348-9.
     
    Helen likes this.
  9. Marco

    Marco Grrrrrrr!

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  10. jimells

    jimells Senior Member

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    Overall, my neurological symptoms are much better than say, four years ago. I'm pretty sure most of that improvement is from CoQ10. Unfortunately, even as the neuro symptoms improve, my overall physical capacity is much, much less than four years ago...

    I started taking it after I found a Pubmed review article that suggested CoQ10 could be helpful for migraine, which seems to be the case for me. That same article did NOT list the anti-seizure med a neuro was trying to sell me at the time.
     

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