Review: 'Through the Shadowlands’ describes Julie Rehmeyer's ME/CFS Odyssey
I should note at the outset that this review is based on an audio version of the galleys and the epilogue from the finished work. Julie Rehmeyer sent me the final version as a PDF, but for some reason my text to voice software (Kurzweil) had issues with it. I understand that it is...
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Guardian online - anti-inflammatories may lower heart attack risk

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Hilary, Aug 28, 2017.

  1. Hilary

    Hilary Senior Member

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  2. AndyPR

    AndyPR Senior Member

    Teaser in case anyone isn't sure about clicking through.
    ETA: From Wikipedia
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canakinumab
     
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  3. RogerBlack

    RogerBlack Senior Member

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    No, it's not - quite - as simple as this. But there is a major element of truth.
    The cost of one dose is ~$10000

    https://www.nice.org.uk/advice/esnm23/chapter/Key-points-from-the-evidence

    The cost of even quite intensive other interventions (lifestyle to reduce reccurance risk) may be lots lower than this. Never mind aspirin.


    Paper at:
    http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1707914#t=article

    [​IMG]

    Seems to be the money shot.
    The hazard ratio climbing back towards 1 for the 300mg dose leaves me wondering if there could be major statistical artifacts. I'd need to dig deeper into it.

    The best case reduction of ~15% seems also questionable - $10K or so is a lot of money you can plow into nonpharmaceutical risk reduction.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2017
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  4. anni66

    anni66 mum to ME daughter

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    Choleresterol is the elephant in the room. They desparately need to find other uses for statins.
    Insulin resistance is one of the largest drivers of inflammation.
     
  5. anni66

    anni66 mum to ME daughter

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  6. Woolie

    Woolie Senior Member

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    That's in the US, right? What would be the cost of this drug in the UK? I'm not sure of the magnitude of the US markup on drugs. I seem to recall its pretty huge (especially for drugs whose cost may include special medical services like infusions).
     
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  7. RogerBlack

    RogerBlack Senior Member

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    The NICE page gave the UK cost, which was about the same as a quick googling of the price in the US.
     
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  8. Woolie

    Woolie Senior Member

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    @RogerBlack, I just read this interesting article:

    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/bus...g/news-story/3a01f2552e0fe4fdd79b3059a03bfef3

    Its suggests that the currently high price of this drug is driven largely by the rarity of the conditions it treats (so few opportunities to recoup profits), and that that would change if it became a more widely used drug:
    Interestingly, this would also lower the price for those with rare diseases too.

    (This could be important us - this drug might turn out to be useful for a subset of us).
     
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  9. Gingergrrl

    Gingergrrl Senior Member

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    Does anyone know if this statistic is accurate? I'm curious in regard to a family member who had a heart attack a few months ago (not myself) and although was put on a statin, a beta blocker, and a blood thinner b/c had balloon angioplasty and stent put in during an emergency surgery post heart attack, given this person's history, I am doubtful he will continue with the meds long-term (or even short-term).

    I'm confused how this would help to prevent a second heart attack? It is a MAB drug (monoclonal antibody) so I assume in the same class as Rituximab but it is to prevent heart attacks? Is it given via IV or injection? Sorry for my confusion!

    Yes, all drug prices are jacked up in the US and no price caps are placed on Pharma which is the most powerful lobby in the country (except maybe the NRA)?
     

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