Invest in ME Conference 12: First Class in Every Way
OverTheHills wraps up our series of articles on this year's 12th Invest in ME International Conference (IIMEC12) in London with some reflections on her experience as a patient attending the conference for the first time.
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Grue-lling stuff (psychosomatic article)

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by msf, Feb 6, 2016.

  1. msf

    msf Senior Member

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    ahmo and Aurator like this.
  2. Valentijn

    Valentijn Senior Member

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    A less cryptic (more accurate) title and intro for this thread might generate more interest.
     
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  3. Invisible Woman

    Invisible Woman Senior Member

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    I personally find the notion of using the concept or term "career" to describe my illness & it's progression, including the losses of :successful career, social status and family life extremely offensive.

    An example of academic navel gazing ... charlatan indeed.
     
  4. msf

    msf Senior Member

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    I didn´t think it deserved more interest. I´ll change the title in any case.
     
  5. duncan

    duncan Senior Member

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    Perhaps this is a case of a narrative that falsely imagines it is an article.
     
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  6. Scarecrow

    Scarecrow Revolting Peasant

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    Sociology is completely unfamiliar stuff to me. It's easy to take offense at the language used (I don't like it either) but I think this will turn out to be a sympathetic article.
     
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  7. jimells

    jimells Senior Member

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    I read the abstract four times and I *still* can't even make out whether this is actual research, a review article, or a hypothesis. It just seems like socio-babble - perhaps something got lost in translation from Norwegian?

    I have thought more than once that having this awful illness is a full-time job with no vacation from poverty or holidays from pain. But I don't have a need to have a "career" to feel good about myself (or not), and I never have. Is that unusual?

    Being a wage-slave is about having food and shelter while trying to evade the noose of debt. If I want to improve my self-esteem, I'll work on my music (if I still could). If sociologists want to help us, access to the necessities of life would be a good start.
     
  8. mfairma

    mfairma Senior Member

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    This isn't necessarily negative. It appears to be an attempt to reframe popular understanding of illness away from traditional pejoratives by equating living with illness to work, or that's how I read it. It is more than a bit ambiguous and unclear in language. If that reading is accurate, it could produce some positives along several different axes. That said, I agree with @jimells, things that have tangible value tend to matter more when you're starving . . .
     
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  9. IreneF

    IreneF Senior Member

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    The equation of illness = career plays into the stereotype of the "professional patient" or hypochondriac, altho I don't think that was intended. It's hard to be sick all the time, but it's not an identity.
     
  10. mfairma

    mfairma Senior Member

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    Yes, my reading was probably too optimistic. I looked up some of his other work (http://uio.academia.edu/JanGrue) and it seems to be coming from a place of questioning ME as being a real illness, positioning it as a disease that has been part of broadening definitions of what disability even means. Regardless, reading his work is like pulling teeth. He needs to figure out more what he is trying to say and say it.
     
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  11. Denise

    Denise Senior Member

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    Thanks @mfairma for the link to his other work. His other work helps clarify his position (re ME) with this paper.

    He seems to use more words that are really necessary for the number of ideas he is writing about.

    And I appreciate knowing about this site as a resource.
     
  12. Woolie

    Woolie Senior Member

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    Time to bring in our simple guide to evaluating articles:
    CUQ8AYvWsAAY-WJ.png_large.png
    What quadrant might we place this article in... hmmm....
     
  13. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Without a full publication this could be anything. If we care about this at all we need the full article, which I gather is not yet published.

    This is jargon heavy. Words may not have the conventional meanings.
     
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  14. Woolie

    Woolie Senior Member

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    Shades of Humpty Dumpty in Through the Looking Glass!
     
  15. IreneF

    IreneF Senior Member

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    Social sciences writing is often turgid.
     
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  16. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    It appears to be sub-discipline jargon heavy. Even those outside their own discipline can have trouble. I have read some sociology as part of my investigations over the years. Some of it is very good. Then there is the other kind.
     
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