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Grey and white matter differences in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - A voxel-based morphometry study.

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Kati, Oct 13, 2017.

  1. Kati

    Kati Patient in training

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    Grey and white matter differences in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - A voxel-based morphometry study.

    Finkelmeyer A1, He J2, Maclachlan L3, Watson S1, Gallagher P1, Newton JL4, Blamire AM5.
    Author information
    1Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, England, UK.
    2Aberdeen Biomedical Imaging Centre, University of Aberdeen, Scotland, UK.
    3Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Göteborgs Universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    4Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, England, UK.
    5Newcastle Magnetic Resonance Centre, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, England, UK.


    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE:

    Investigate global and regional grey and white matter volumes in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and recent voxel-based morphometry (VBM) methods.

    METHODS:

    Forty-two patients with CFS and thirty healthy volunteers were scanned on a 3-Tesla MRI scanner. Anatomical MRI scans were segmented, normalized and submitted to a VBM analysis using randomisation methods. Group differences were identified in overall segment volumes and voxel-wise in spatially normalized grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) segments.

    RESULTS:

    Accounting for total intracranial volume, patients had larger GM volume and lower WM volume. The voxel-wise analysis showed increased GM volume in several structures including the amygdala and insula in the patient group. Reductions in WM volume in the patient group were seen primarily in the midbrain, pons and right temporal lobe.

    CONCLUSION:

    Elevated GM volume in CFS is seen in areas related to processing of interoceptive signals and stress. Reduced WM volume in the patient group partially supports earlier findings of WM abnormalities in regions of the midbrain and brainstem.

    Link to paper:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29021956
     
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  2. Cheesus

    Cheesus Senior Member

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