The 12th Invest in ME Conference, Part 1
OverTheHills presents the first article in a series of three about the recent 12th Invest In ME international Conference (IIMEC12) in London.
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Good article on Jen's film Unrest in The Telegraph today 24th Oct

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS News' started by Countrygirl, Oct 24, 2017.

  1. Countrygirl

    Countrygirl Senior Member

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    [​IMG]
    Filmmaker Jennifer Brea in London last week CREDIT: ANDREW CROWLEY/TELEGRAPH

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health-f...y-perceive-chronic-fatigue-syndrome/?WT.mc_id

     
  2. Molly98

    Molly98 Senior Member

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    What a fantastic article :balloons::balloons::balloons::thumbsup:

    Even better, it's in the paper my parents read :)
     
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  3. hellytheelephant

    hellytheelephant Senior Member

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    How wonderful it is to have a really good article on ME in a mainstream newspaper, that you can tell people to read!!:balloons::balloons::balloons::balloons::balloons::balloons::balloons::balloons::balloons::balloons::balloons::balloons::balloons::balloons::balloons::balloons::balloons::balloons::balloons::balloons::balloons::balloons::balloons::balloons::balloons::balloons:
     
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  4. garcia

    garcia Aristocrat Extraordinaire

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    "Brea, meanwhile, puts her improvement (to the point of being able to travel and finish the film) down to two antivirals and a drug used to treat related autoimmune diseases, prescribed off-label by doctors in the US"

    One of the antivirals is Valcyte. The drug used to treat autoimmune diseases is Mestinon. Does anyone know what the 2nd antiviral drug she used is?
     
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  5. NelliePledge

    NelliePledge plodder

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    Yes good article much better than the skimpy mealy mouthed Guardian piece well done Telegraph
     
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  6. liverock

    liverock Senior Member

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    FTY, Solstice, Countrygirl and 4 others like this.
  7. Rick Sanchez

    Rick Sanchez

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    This piece was great. Also loved how Jen was allowed a rebuttal against the coward... Sorry I mean respectable nameless neurosurgeon.

    I honestly feel like vomitting every time I see Theguardian writing some piss piece on ME/CFS where they always end up with some fraud who spouts out some unchallenged garbage in the end.

    Whereas this is just genius, also makes the guy come off as a complete nut-job. I mean, what possible reason would the man have to not come forward with his name?
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2017
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  8. jstash

    jstash Senior Member

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    The Telegraph have published many articles that I've been impressed with on ME/CFS. This is somewhat at odds with their conservative viewpoint which you'd be inclined to think would be very pro-establishment and tradition. Hats off to all the journalists who've gone the extra mile to write thoughtful articles and listen to patients, I hope it continues.
     
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  9. Demepivo

    Demepivo Dolores Abernathy

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    The author Guy Kelly is on Twitter, if you fancy saying thanks for the article.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/MrGuyKelly

     
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  10. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    The Telegraph has a conservative stance, but its original tradition was liberal — the old school liberalism that appeared in the first phase of modern globalization/liberalism, the phase from 1850 to 1914. This newspaper's name the "The Telegraph" hints at its original liberal stance: the telegraph was the Internet of its day, facilitating global communications and globalization. I don't read newspapers anymore since getting ME/CFS, but I when I did, I always felt The Telegraph was conservative, but with an injection of pragmatic and intelligent liberalism.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2017
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  11. Binkie4

    Binkie4 Senior Member

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    Thank you @Hip. That is an interesting perspective.

    I used to be a keen (Manchester) Guardian reader based on the fact that in the 'sit ins' of 1968 ( in Paris, LSE and other UK universities), the Guardian was the only paper to report the event in which I participated accurately.

    Either I was mistaken then, or the Guardian has changed its agenda. We have written to the editor, no response. I suspect it needs a campaign including Guardian buyers but they tend to be very committed to the paper. Less open minded than they think perhaps.
     
  12. FTY

    FTY

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    Great article!! :balloons: So good to see all these well written articles emerging. I've been messaging Woman's Hour to try to get them to cover it but no luck yet.
     
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  13. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    The Guardian's in-depth and ornate intellectual style I think sometimes works against the cause to make society appreciate ME/CFS is a real physical disease with a biological basis, because people like Simon Wessely, Suzanne O'Sullivan and the other pseudoscientists who propose an "all in the mind" psychogenic origin for ME/CFS tend to create complex and ornate pseudo-intellectual frameworks to embellish their views — no doubt because these psychogenic views are such silly nonsense with no empirical basis that they feel they have to clad them in a pseudo-intellectual smokescreen to create a superficial air of scientific respectability.

    I get the impression that some Guardian journalists are fooled by the pseudo-intellectual smokescreen, mistaking it for high-brow analysis.

    So whereas you would expect the Guardian, with its strong pro-science and pro-intellectual credentials, to champion the view that ME/CFS is a real physical disease and point accusing fingers at these silly psychogenic suppositions, some Guardian journalists end up getting suckered in by Wessely's or O'Sullivan psychogenic views, due to their superficial appearance of being scientific.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2017
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  14. NelliePledge

    NelliePledge plodder

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    But the Guardian has always taken an anti establishment stance and here they are shoring up the establishment
     
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  15. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    I have never viewed the Guardian as anti-establishment. They are leftwing / liberal, and liberalism is the establishment these days.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2017
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  16. garcia

    garcia Aristocrat Extraordinaire

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  17. NelliePledge

    NelliePledge plodder

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    the left/liberals are not in control in the UK
     
  18. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    @NelliePledge, did you not notice the major swing from conservative values to liberal values that has taken place over the last say 40 or 50 years, not just in the UK, but in all Western countries? I am not just referring to politics and government, but in pretty much all walks of life. We are living in the neoliberal era; it started perhaps in the late 1960s, and gathered more and more momentum in subsequent decades. Now of course some are concerned this neoliberal era might be coming to an end, with the rise of right wing populism.

    But we are not supposed to talk politics on this forum unless it relates to ME/CFS (although I am not sure that the rise of liberalism would come under politics; it's more like a value system that has taken hold of Western society).
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2017
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  19. NelliePledge

    NelliePledge plodder

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    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neoliberalism

    The term appears to mean different things in different places

    To me having grown up in the 60s and 70s in the UK and then gone through the 80s austerity and deregulation are of the right not the left. The Guardian was a left wing paper. I don't understand how they can support BPS which is so tied up in oppressing patients and denying access to benefits.
     
  20. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    It does, but in modern usage, neoliberalism means the re-establishment of liberal values that took place from around the end of the 1960's onwards.



    The same newspaper may publish both articles which support the BPS "all in the mind" views of ME/CFS, as well as articles that support the opposite view that ME/CFS is a real physical disease with a biological cause. I think it often depends on the journalist writing the article.

    Of course, any journalist that falls for the "all in the mind" twaddle of BPS needs to be sent on a refresher course of scientific skepticism (not to mention a refresher course on how corporate interests, in this case the disability insurance industry, can manipulate the agenda); but without toting up the scores for pro- and anti-BPS articles published by the Guardian over the years, and comparing these scores to those other newspapers, it's hard to say whether the Guardian is more pro-BPS than other papers.
     

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