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GMC rules against doctor who used unconventional tests and treatments for chronic fa

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS News' started by lilpink, Nov 8, 2011.

  1. lilpink

    lilpink

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    Posting without prejudice


    GMC rules against doctor who used unconventional tests and treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome
    1. Clare Dyer
    +Author Affiliations
    1. 1BMJ
    A GP who diagnosed an infection similar to Lyme disease in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome adopted an unwavering mindset that ignored mainstream medicine, a General Medical Council fitness to practise panel has said.
    The panel decided that Andrew Wrights fitness to practise was impaired, despite his recantation and his resolution to practise only evidence based medicine in future. The sanction to be imposed will be decided at a later date.
    Dr Wright ran a private practice in Bolton, Lancashire, specialising in the management of fatigue disorders from 2003 to 2006. He faced charges over his management of 11 patients, all of which he admitted.
    Dr Wright admitted sending samples of patients blood to the Bowen Research and Training Institute in Florida, although the institute was not licensed for clinical laboratory testing and its tests should not be used for diagnostic purposes.
    In some cases he carried out direct microscopy himself on samples of patients blood, although this was not the appropriate test for diagnosing Lyme disease or other Borrelia infection and he lacked adequate specialist training in microscopy.
    In one case he diagnosed borreliosis on the basis of a fluorescent antibody test that was not generally recognised as being validated for the purpose and then recommended treatment.
    In a report to one patient who was given a diagnosis of a bacterial illness on the basis of results from the Bowen institute, Dr Wright admitted incorrectly describing the structure and function of granular structures, wrongly describing cell wall deficient bacteria in white cells, and incorrectly stating the role of vitamin D and angiotensin II in cell wall deficient L form bacterial illness.
    Dr Wright acknowledged letting down his patients at a time when they were vulnerable and looking for hope and a diagnosis; putting them at risk of harm, whether actual or perceived; and subjecting them to unnecessary expense. He told the panel that he had stopped treating patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, had had a fundamental change of mindset, and would practise only evidence based medicine in future.
    The panel said it accepted that Dr Wright was a good and caring doctor with a previously unblemished career who knew more about chronic fatigue syndrome than most GPs and was motivated by a wish to help his patients. But he had prescribed long term antibiotics and other unconventional treatments, including medilight therapy, which involved the removal and reinsertion of patients blood in a non-sterile environment, described as horrifying by an expert in microbiology.
    Although the panel was satisfied that Dr Wright did not pose a future risk to patients, it concluded that this was serious misconduct which had put patients at unwarranted risk of harm, brought the medical profession into disrepute, and breached fundamental tenets of the medical profession.
    Notes
    Cite this as: BMJ 2011;343:d7220
  2. sianrecovery

    sianrecovery Senior Member

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    I have not been treated by Dr Wright, but I know plenty who have and who are deeply grateful for his efforts on their behalf. Its a terrible indicitment on British medicine, and the cabal of psychiatrists who control access to ME research funding, that rather than reflect on how appallingly badly the NHS is failing ME patients, it bolsters its position by these witch hunts.I am deeply saddened.
  3. taniaaust1

    taniaaust1 Senior Member

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    Very sad.. I sure ME/CFS patients just lost another good doctor there.

    It really bothers me that ones like Wessely get away with the harm they do which has extended world wide, where as the doctors who are really working hard to help their patients with this are punished.
  4. SilverbladeTE

    SilverbladeTE Senior Member

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    Well, when they finally are forced to admit they were bigotted, patient-abusing monsters, he can sue them for millions, Moderator: violent language removed
  5. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    I know someone who saw doctor Wright, and got a lot of good advice about things peripherally related to CFS. He was clearly unusually well informed about, and committed to helping, CFS patients. But... he was wrong about the Lyme stuff, and it looks like he realises that now.

    I wish that those whose psychological claims were equally inaccurate and even more damaging were held to the same standard, and up before the GMC, but that doesn't mean Dr Wright didn't make any mistakes. I wonder how it will go for him.
    wdb likes this.
  6. jace

    jace Off the fence

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    Patients have actually died as a result of their inappropriate psychiatric treatment, yet that is approved by NICE while the doctors that help us are hounded by the MRC. Unbelievable, but sadly true.
    peggy-sue and justinreilly like this.
  7. sianrecovery

    sianrecovery Senior Member

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    I dont know if he was any more in the dark re Lyme than anyone else, it was a topic he had a direct interest in, and the lyme patients I've meet who were treated by him did at least receive treatment, and some made a full recovery.
  8. Enid

    Enid Senior Member

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    Sad day and simply reflects the hold of the "establishment" in the UK - seeking to protect just that alone and blinkered beyond.

    (Certain names/institutions well known to all bent only on keeping their status quo - not too interested in medical advances and understanding either).
  9. Mog

    Mog

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    Yes, I think he was very well informed about Lyme, it's just he was diagnosing it differently, instead of using the NHS based tests which I believe are notoriously unrealiable. I guess he was working on the assumption that a lot of fatigue cases are undiagnosed Lyme, and he had obviously found that to be the case with at least some of his patients.
    I'm very sorry to hear that he's stopped treating fatigue. He was very well informed on and experienced in the subject. I consulted him for a while, until he stopped his fatigue clinic, and he was good, knowledgeable and, most importantly, willing to help. He did genuinely want to help you. As far as I know, Dr Wright and Dr Myhill were the only doctors in the UK who were really knowledgeable about fatigue conditions, and now we've lost one of them. It's utterly depressing.

    And for the GMC to say that he "brought the medical profession into disrepute".... Well, if I wasn't so depressed about it, I'd laugh. Ignoring, dismissing and failing to treat appropriately approximately 250,000 UK patients isn't considered as bringing the medical profession into disrepute? It has in my book.
  10. SilverbladeTE

    SilverbladeTE Senior Member

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    Mog
    hey, it's hard to bring the UK medical profession into much lower repute, when they let one of their kind murder 260+ old people!
    (really needs an "evil" smiley, lol)
  11. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    He may have "meant well", but the fact remains that he used inaccurate testing which also puts patients at risk and that issue needed to be dealt with.

    Don't know if the argument that well this doctor or that doctor did worse or better really holds water. It's like telling a police officer, "Well the other's were speeding as well." He made mistakes not following best medical practice.

    Whether he should lose his license or be monitored, I don't know.
  12. taniaaust1

    taniaaust1 Senior Member

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    Maybe one day when it is clear and proven to the UK medical profession on just how wrong they were about ME, maybe then past patients of this doctor who's suffered due to helping, could nominate him for some kind of humanitarian award for treating very sick patients when no one else would.

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