The 12th Invest in ME Conference, Part 1
OverTheHills presents the first article in a series of three about the recent 12th Invest In ME international Conference (IIMEC12) in London.
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Gluten Psychosis: Confirmation of a New Clinical Entity

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by natasa778, Jul 16, 2015.

  1. natasa778

    natasa778 Senior Member

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    http://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/7/7/5235/htm

     
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  2. sarah darwins

    sarah darwins I told you I was ill

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    This feels important. It's worth noting that the girl in question is not celiac.
     
  3. A.B.

    A.B. Senior Member

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    This girl is very lucky. Were it not for the nutritionist she might have spent many years, perhaps the rest of her life, as "psychotic somatizer" with probable steady decline until the tragic end.
     
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  4. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    I would think that the psychosis cannot have been due to gluten alone, since the girl went through 14 years of life presumably eating gluten without any problems.

    My guess is that this girl probably contracted some type of chronic infection, which changed the dynamics in her gut, such that gluten then became a problem for her.

    The report said the girl's problems appeared after a febrile episode, so that suggests that was when an infection was caught.


    I found this article about wheat and schizophrenia interesting:

     
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  5. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    One case is not enough information to make this conclusion. It may be correct, it may not. It may be a coincidence that she felt better or something else.

    I'm surprised the authors came to this conclusion. I need to look at it again as maybe it's a case study which is a bit different as far as what conclusions are drawn.

    What do the authors mean when they say "paranoid thinking and suicidal ideation up to a state of pre-coma."?

    I haven't heard of the term "pre coma".


    Barb
     
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  6. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    Remember that "she occasionally experienced inadvertent gluten exposures, which triggered the recurrence of her psychotic symptoms within about four hours".

    So this is not a one off event, but rather multiple occasions where gluten has triggered psychosis in this patient.
     
  7. barbc56

    barbc56 Senior Member

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    It's still not enough information. Attributing symptoms after the fact can be very biased. How many times was she inadvertently exposed and didn't have symptoms?

    It's certainly intriguing as a theory but I'm not sure what it all means as far as drawing any conclusions.

    Barb

    ETA

    Okay, the authors kind of redeem themself here. It still seems somewhat tenuous. I could not make the quote function to work.o_O

    "The present case report shows that psychosis may be a manifestation of NCGS, and may also involve children; the diagnosis is difficult with many cases remaining undiagnosed. The pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric manifestations of NCGS is an intriguing and still poorly understood issue. Well designed prospective studies are needed to establish the real role of gluten as a triggering factor in these diseases."
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2015
  8. ahmo

    ahmo Senior Member

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    I had no reason to believe I had a celiac or gluten problem. (In spite of the fact that I always had belly aches, and only wore elastic waists) During my worst year of ME, my appetite deteriorated, my nervous system was a mess, my connective tissue symptoms manifested in a system so stuck that it took me 15-20 myofascial sessions to relieve the constant pain and and immobility. I was over-reactive to any and every stimulus. In fact, I was researching exit strategies.

    When I encountered the label Gut and Psychology Syndrome, the name leaped out as a description of my hell. Within 3 days gluten/dairy free, my nervous system calmed by at least 50%. Within 2 weeks the remaining tendonous holding in my hands, Dupuytrens Contractures, had melted. And yet when I returned to my GP, he looked at his screen, then said, "But you don't have celiac."
     
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  9. RustyJ

    RustyJ Contaminated Cell Line 'RustyJ'

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    Gluten intolerance could be recently acquired... as a result of recent infection, or environmental. Even if it was not recently acquired, the tolerance itself could have reached a threshold.
     
  10. natasa778

    natasa778 Senior Member

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    Absolutely. Isn't this what most people are dealing with when we talk about deterioration after an infection or a vaccine or another type of trigger. I hear this about asd cases all the time. This trigger pulls with itself all kinds of other pathologies, gut/food sensitivities being often the major one.

    It'd be interesting to know if there is something intrinsic to gluten that makes it a prime candidate for secondary pathology, or does it become a problem simply because it is so omnipresent in the diet and the gut. I.e. are we looking at some sort of 'mimicking' autoimmune mechanism (whereas the pathogen was hiding behind what was available at the time) where the host immue system mistakes wheat/gluten for a pathogen. I always wondered if there is any gluten sensitivity issues in Asian people who don't eat it daily. Would rice instead be causing similar symptoms in say a Chinese person who never consumes wheat.
     
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  11. anciendaze

    anciendaze Senior Member

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    I've seen such a case, (though not in any professional capacity.) The individual definitely has severe gluten sensitivity. This was demonstrated when the kitchen in a restaurant made an error about a meal which was supposed to be gluten-free. She ate the meal with evident enthusiasm, then brought it up within a few minutes. (If I had that problem, I would be very careful about eating in restaurants.)

    Unfortunately, the years it took to correctly identify the problem, and the resulting psychological disturbances, produced much the same effect as long-term hallucinogen abuse. Even after the problem was identified there were serious difficulties with interpersonal relations, and even paranoid reasoning. It could be a textbook example of false attribution of causes. It is hard enough to sort things out when you have a brain that works well. It is also hard to develop much empathy when you have constant evidence that what goes on in your mind is markedly different from what goes on in others.

    When she limited her diet to a particular kind of rice, said to be especially healthy, she never considered that this might also expose her to other dietary problems. When tests showed arsenic in her body she accused people of deliberately poisoning her. The discovery that exactly this kind of rice had high levels of arsenic came years later.

    If you let this go on for years, the patient will have serious psychological disturbances. If it starts before an adult personality forms, you can expect a personality disorder.

    I hesitate to use the term "autoimmune" here because that tends to be limited to patients with demonstrated autoantibodies. This may be "autoinflammatory" or it may be a response to environmental antigens that simply don't cause any response in others -- inflammatory, but not auto.

    We very badly need to understand what the immune system is doing in these cases, and develop interventions which can prevent the devastation of any long-term problem with disabling psychological manifestations.
     
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