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Gluten: Bad for us ALL !

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by xchocoholic, May 15, 2012.

  1. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    Let me ask you an opposite question. Was there less water/air pollution between 1970 and 1980 during the Cold War? I don't know anyone who would agree with this statement. During the cold war all kind of crap was put into rivers, air and lakes. We lacked technology to filter and clean waste and we lacked regulation. This changed.

    Regarding mercury, it is a poison and toxin but I come more and more to the conclusion that it's effects on world health are highly exaggerated and that whenever people lack the will to conduct scientific research, they blame it on some toxins, fungi, parasites or whatever. These explanations all have in common that there is a clearly defined, easy to understand enemy, which can be fought by certain treatment approaches. Understanding what really drives diseases is far beyond the intellectual capacity of these people. I myself lack the knowledge but this is no excuse for not at least trying to read and understand scientific papers.

    Back to mercury. There is one country where the population has one of the highest mercury exposures worldwide, Japan. The Japanese like to eat fish and their fish is highly contaminated with mercury. This goes so far that some fish contain 900 times more mercury than what is allowed. And now the miracle, despite these huge amounts of mercury, the Japanese consume every year, their life expectancy is the highest in the world. I highly doubt, that mercury is the culprit for whatever it is blamed for.
  2. orion

    orion Senior Member

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    I agree. I find that explanation fairly plausible.

    However, I think it's unlikely that more than a tiny percentage of ME sufferers have undiagnosed classic coeliac disease (by "classic" coeliac disease I mean the type that can be definitively diagnosed by taking a gut biopsy). Even taking into account the average timespan of 11 years that it takes to diagnose someone with the disease (which incidentally is an utter disgrace), I think that, by now, some doctors (or patients) would have made the connection, if the diseases were actually the same.

    For what it's worth, at my request, I had a biopsy taken to test for coeliac disease a few years ago, and it came back negative. But I might try a gluten free diet anyway at some point, on the basis that there might be a difference between classic coeliac disease and gluten intolerance.

    Interestingly, I just did some googling on this subject, and found out that several tennis players, including Andy Murray, have tried a gluten-free diet, with apparently good results. (http://tennisdailynews.net/andy-murray-gluten-free-tennis-champion-diet).

    I don't really see any downside to ME sufferers trying a gluten free diet on a speculative basis. Even if gluten sensitivity doesn't turn out to be the underlying problem, the diet will, at the very least, force you to eat more healthily because most processed stodgy food contains gluten.
  3. xchocoholic

    xchocoholic Senior Member

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    A less radical view on gluten intolerance ... :D

    http://glutendoctors.blogspot.com/2012/03/gluten-awareness-is-on-rise-but-is-it.html

    http://glutendoctors.blogspot.com/2010/02/sluggish-thyroid-find-out-if-youre.html

    http://glutendoctors.blogspot.com/2010/11/how-immune-system-gets-confused-in.html


  4. Calathea

    Calathea Darkness therapy

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    I don't think that's how it works most of the time. You're suggesting that someone on an unhealthy diet, relying heavily on processed foods, will transition to a healthy diet if they cut out gluten. No doubt this does happen occasionally, I think you're more likely to get one of the following:

    1) Person is on an unhealthy diet, relying heavily on processed foods. They cut out gluten, probably because a doctor has told them they have to. They move from a bad diet to a more restricted bad diet, without widening their range to become healthier cooks.
    2) Person is cutting out gluten to see if it helps, out of an interest in health and nutrition. They have already cut out or at least minimised processed foods before they do this, as cutting out processed foods is a more obvious first step.

    I definitely think that cutting out gluten is worth a try, there seems to be a high rate of gluten sensitivity in ME patients, but it's not entirely risk-free. Grains are an important food group, and many people with ME are already on limited diets by this point. It's worth trying, but it is unlikely to be all that easy, and it should be done carefully in order to maintain good nutrition.
  5. EastTenn

    EastTenn

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    For all practical purposes, I grew up on a wheat farm in North Dakota. In the 1970's, the genetics of wheat changed dramatically with the introduction of related grass strains that humans had never been exposed to genetically. The recent book, "The Wheat Belly", discussing the new wheat and the new gluten extensively:

    In Wheat Belly, Davis exposes the harmful effects of what is actually a product of genetic tinkering and agribusiness being sold to the American public as “wheat”—and provides readers with a user-friendly, step-by-step plan to navigate a new, wheat-free lifestyle.
    In 1969, most wheat that was grown had long stalks, was long season, and wasn't all that much different from wheat grown 100, 200 or even 4000 years ago.

    But by 1975, as a teenager I was shocked at how wheat had become a totally different crop: short, bearded, more drought-resistant, shorter season, higher yielding. Even then, I knew something was different. Wheat even became itchy to harvest, as the dust just seemed to irritate the skin. Our food, and specifically gluten protein, became different as non-wheat genetics were introduced into wheat. Before, the wheat harvest used to be a joyous occasion. That joyful sense was gone.

    Durum wheat, the type of wheat that goes into making semolina, has not nearly changed as much genetically.
    adreno likes this.
  6. adreno

    adreno 3% neanderthal

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    Tundras of Europa
    EastTenn, I'm guessing spelt would be another good option.
  7. EastTenn

    EastTenn

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    I stay away from spelt only because my body can't take gluten of any kind.

    Oats, even though widely grown, hasn't been modified signficantly. There's just not enough agribusiness money in oats. My body seems to love it, plus quinoa as well as specialty varieties of rice.
  8. xchocoholic

    xchocoholic Senior Member

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    Many celiacs can't process oats. I see this in my celiac support group even. There's always
    a show of hands when asked who has problems with bob's red mill gf oats too. We know certain varieties are cross contaminated. I know quaker is but
    I'm not sure about the others. It's on the web tho. I can't eat it so I don't keep up with this.

    There is a percentage of people who can't process any grains. The literature behind this is in the paleo
    info on the web. I like the way cordain explains it. Dr terry wahls does too tho.

    The fact that you crave oats can be a sign of Food intolerance / addiction. Tc . X
  9. EastTenn

    EastTenn

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    Not sure where I ever stated I crave oats. Periodically have organic steel cut oats for breakfast with coconut oil, plus a protein and vegetables. While I know most people here don't subscribe to the idea of Nutrition Response Testing, foods can also be tested for harm and the oats, quinoa, and specialty rices I consume have never revealed any harm for me.

    Any food with wheat, spelt, barley, corn, soy, dairy (except butter), or eggs, and Nutrition Response Tests instantly show that they present a significant hazard for me, especially with regards to brain inflammation. Most CFS sufferers have multiple food sensitivities that vary be person, so I can certainly understand wanting to avoid grains of any type if thats what a person's condition warrants.
  10. xchocoholic

    xchocoholic Senior Member

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    Sorry, I infered this from you're saying that your body loves it. I know people who trust these non scientific
    methods of gauging food intolerances and I respect their opinions.

    Personally, I don't trust the tests that don't look
    for biological markers for a food intolerance. Having a clear biological reaction supercedes all tests tho.

    I have a dd who gets anaphylaxis from peanuts but her tests don't always show it. She's a living breathing peanut meter.
    Lol .. I'm the same way with gluten. Minute amounts nail me.

    Fwiw, many grains are showing cross contamination issues. Tricia Thompson has info on this but it's on the web too.

    Tc .. X

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