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Genetic testing accuracy

Discussion in 'Genetic Testing and SNPs' started by caledonia, Jun 7, 2012.

  1. caledonia

    caledonia

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    Been doing a lot of research on methylation stuff lately and ran across this - both Ben Lynch (from MTHFR.net) and Amy Yasko say that genetic testing based on saliva may not be accurate. Testing from blood is the most accurate.

    The Spectacell and Quest MTHFR tests and Yasko's test are based on blood.

    This leaves tests such as 23andme based on saliva in question.
     
  2. August59

    August59 Daughters High School Graduation

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    Well you have yasko and Lynch using blood. I haven't read anything from a mainstream doctor, researcher or any other profession pushing the 23andme test. My personal opinion would be blood as a first choice. The only thing that I have ever heard saliva to be accurate on is cortisol. Ben Lynch was not bashful about the use of "hair' for analysis, but I have to agree I can't wrap my mind around hair being a good choice. My intergrative doctor will not use it either.
     
  3. Gestalt

    Gestalt Senior Member

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    If you do the saliva test, just make sure you don't make out with someone before doing it. Could skew results. ;)
     
    August59 likes this.
  4. nanonug

    nanonug Senior Member

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    roxie60 likes this.
  5. caledonia

    caledonia

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    That study says saliva is 100% accurate. Another one (from links in the right column) says 97% accurate. I'm not sure what the sample size was for either. Ben Lynch has seen different results for the same person who was tested by both blood and saliva, so that's how he came to his conclusion. So it sounds like 97% is more likely.

    Ben Lynch is working on his own SNPs test, so whenever that comes out, it will be another alternative to consider.
     
  6. greenshots

    greenshots Senior Member

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    I tried to get the saliva test on my youngest child since he was so little but it came out messed up twice! Now Yasko won't even use it as an option for these younger ones. Her asst said they found saliva was accurate about 40-50% of the time so they couldn't justify doing them. Maybe 23&me has a more effective method?
     
  7. Pegasus

    Pegasus

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    This is something thats been on my mind as well,especially if you´re like me and will do the test from outside the USA.
    The fact that saliva may not be as reliable source from testing and if you add up that you have to ship it,so who knows what might happen,bad handling,temperature variations?
    It seems to me yasko´s test is a safer option.
     
  8. Lynn_M

    Lynn_M Senior Member

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    I had the Spectracell blood MTHFR test in March, through Dr. Ben Lynch, and then had the 23andMe test last month. Both showed I was ++ for A1298C.
     
  9. caledonia

    caledonia

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    Following up: I did get the 23andme test. It agrees with my two SNPs from an MTHFR blood test.

    Also, an update on Ben Lynch's SNPs test. He stopped working on it because verification would have been extremely expensive. So we're back to Yasko and 23andme for something more extensive than MTHFR.
     
  10. triffid113

    triffid113 Day of the Square Peg

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    Well...I thought this topic was going to discuss something a little different...basically that epigenetics (what you eat and lifestyle choices) are more important in most cases than genes. So, for instance, I have two +/+ CBS genetic defects and should according to Yasko have low homocysteine, however luckily I had checked it before getting my genes tested and mine was HIGH. So while I think genetic tests are worthwhile, it is still important to look at organic acid type tests to determine what your epigenetic situation is.

    Triff
     
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  11. greenshots

    greenshots Senior Member

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    That only applies to just having the MTHFR defect with the CBS defect. If you also have the BHMT's, MTR or MTRR defects you'll have normal or higher homocysteine levels cuz you just have too many defects that lead to that. Nothing is absolute and you have to watch all of her lectures to see how this all works. The epigenetics part is very important and I don't think anyne discounts that. My doc alwways reminds me not to fall into the all or nothing category so I will say the same. Be careful about thinking in absolute terms because thats not how anything works.
     
    merylg likes this.
  12. kday

    kday Senior Member

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    I've compared all my genetic tests over the years to 23andMe results and it's been 100% accurate for me.
     
  13. Gavman

    Gavman Senior Member

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    True Triffid. Though again its circumspect - I showed low levels butyrate and scfa on Oats then high levels on gi panel. High d-arabitinol yet no yeast on gi. Does my head in.
     

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