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GABA Modulating Bacteria of the Human Gut Microbiome

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by hixxy, Jul 4, 2016.

  1. hixxy

    hixxy Senior Member

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    Australia
    Authors
    P. Strandwitz1, K. Kim2, D. Dietrich2, D. McDonald3, T. Ramadhar2, E. J. Stewart1, R. Knight3, J. Clardy2, K. Lewis1; 1Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA, 2Harvard Med. Sch., Boston, MA, 3Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA

    Disclosures
    P. Strandwitz: None. K. Kim: None. D. Dietrich: None. D. McDonald: None. T. Ramadhar: None. E.J. Stewart: None. R. Knight: None. J. Clardy: None. K. Lewis:None.

    Abstract
    The gut microbiome affects many different diseases, and has been recently linked to human mental health. The microbiome community is diverse, but 50-80% of its diversity remains uncultured. We previously reported that uncultured bacteria from the marine environment require growth factors from neighboring species, and by using co-culture, we could cultivate novel diversity. In the present study, we used a similar co-culture approach to grow bacteria from humans stool samples. KLE1738, a “Most-Wanted” member of the human gut microbiome only known by its 16S rDNA signature, was found to require the presence of Bacteroides fragilis KLE1758 for growth. Using bio-assay driven purification of B. fragilis KLE1758supernatant, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter of the central nervous system, was identified as the growth factor for KLE1738. We found no other tested compound but GABA supported the growth of KLE1738, and genomic analysis suggests an unusual metabolism focused on consuming GABA. Due to this unique growth requirement, we provisionally name KLE1738 Evtepia gabavorous. Using growth of E. gabalyticus as an indicator, we then identified novel GABA producing bacteria from the gut microbiome. Reduced levels of GABA are associated with depression, and we found fewer GABA producers in a human cohort of depressed individuals. By modulating the level of GABA, microbial producers and consumers of this neurotransmitter may be influencing host behavior.

    http://www.abstractsonline.com/pp8/#!/4060/presentation/18619
     
    natasa778, South, Comet and 2 others like this.
  2. alkt

    alkt Senior Member

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    your link takes you to a page showing only the abstract you have already printed. iff they can actually prove most cases of depression are cause by certain gut bacteria it should be another nail in the pyschiatrists coffin.
     
    Solstice likes this.
  3. musicfan50

    musicfan50

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  4. alkt

    alkt Senior Member

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    yes thanks . it looks like a whole new area of research is opening up new ideas in the medical world.unless they chose to ignore the possibilities which going on previous form they will.
     

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