Review: 'Through the Shadowlands’ describes Julie Rehmeyer's ME/CFS Odyssey
I should note at the outset that this review is based on an audio version of the galleys and the epilogue from the finished work. Julie Rehmeyer sent me the final version as a PDF, but for some reason my text to voice software (Kurzweil) had issues with it. I understand that it is...
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Further evidence that PWME recruit more brain resources in response to complex tasks

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Marco, Dec 17, 2015.

  1. Marco

    Marco Grrrrrrr!

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    These findings are similar to those previously reported by Lange (if I remember correctly) but this time relates to childhood CFS (CCFS).

    Less efficient and costly processes of frontal cortex in childhood chronic fatigue syndrome

    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2213158215001618

    Some of the authors were also involved in the study that reported on a large 'sensory gating' study in CCFS and the neuroinflammation PET study.

    I've only skimmed this so I hope I haven't misparaphrased.
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2015
  2. Marco

    Marco Grrrrrrr!

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    This is an interesting excerpt :

     
  3. Battery Muncher

    Battery Muncher Senior Member

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    Fascinating stuff, I really need to read Lange when I have the energy
     
  4. L'engle

    L'engle moogle

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    A useful study for those of us with poor cognitive stamina!
     
  5. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

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    I wonder if the observed phenomena "excessive frontal activity" may is in part due to other biases. E.g. those who use more parts of their brain (or have higher intelligence) are more likely to be functional (compared to other patients) and thus more likely to participate in such a study. This may exaggerate the effect, perhaps.

    I'm not at all convinced of the following hypothesis:
    This finding is curious:

    This is interesting, because it is not what some would predict. dACC is hypothesised to be activated as an emotional response to pain. So to be positively associated with motivation, what does this mean?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anterior_cingulate_cortex
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2015
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  6. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

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    Also note, that this study was conducted in Japanese, so the following may be relevant:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Middle_temporal_gyrus
    As such, the findings to do with the middle temporal gyrus may be less likely to be replicated by studies elsewhere in the world.
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2015
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  7. Marco

    Marco Grrrrrrr!

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    I found it interesting that previous studies have suggested a deficit in reward/motivation mechanisms. If I read this current study correctly these kids were more motivated to complete the test despite the extra 'effort' required.
     
  8. Marco

    Marco Grrrrrrr!

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    It's very likely that the use of the Kana pick-out test for divided attention might activate brain areas associated with pattern recognition compared to other languages not based on pictograms but I'd be surprised if other more linguistically related brain areas aren't also recruited in other populations.
     

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