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Fungal infection in cerebrospinal fluid from some patients with multiple sclerosis.

Discussion in 'Fungal Infection (Yeast, Candida)' started by osisposis, Mar 13, 2015.

  1. osisposis

    osisposis Senior Member

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    Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2013 Jun;32(6):795-801. doi: 10.1007/s10096-012-1810-8. Epub 2013 Jan 16.
    Fungal infection in cerebrospinal fluid from some patients with multiple sclerosis.
    Pisa D1, Alonso R, Jiménez-Jiménez FJ, Carrasco L.
    Author information
    Abstract
    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the prototypical inflammatory disease of the central nervous system and spinal cord, leading to axonal demyelination of neurons. Recently, we have found a correlation between fungal infection and MS in peripheral blood of patients. The present work provides evidence of fungal infection in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of some MS patients. Thus, fungal antigens can be demonstrated in CSF, as well as antibodies reacting against several Candida species. Comparison was made between CSF and blood serum for the presence of fungal antigens (proteins) and antibodies against different Candida spp. Analyses of both CSF and serum are complementary and serve to better evaluate for the presence of disseminated fungal infection. In addition, PCR analyses indicate the presence of DNA from different fungal species in CSF, depending on the patient analyzed. Overall, these findings support the notion that fungal infection can be demonstrated in CSF from some MS patients. This may constitute a risk factor in this disease and could also help in understanding the pathogenesis of MS.
    PMID: 23322279 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23322279

    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10096-012-1810-8

    Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2011 Oct;30(10):1173-80. doi: 10.1007/s10096-011-1206-1. Epub 2011 May 1.
    Fungal infection in a patient with multiple sclerosis.
    Pisa D1, Alonso R, Carrasco L.
    Author information
    Abstract
    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, whose causes are still unknown. We have proposed that MS, as well as some ophthalmologic diseases, are associated with fungal infection. In the present study, we closely monitored a patient with MS over a three-year period. Antibodies against different Candida spp. were detected in peripheral blood serum, although the titer of these antibodies fluctuated. The presence of fungal macromolecules, such as proteins, polysaccharides, and DNA, was also tested. In several sera samples, antigens related to C. famata were evidenced by the slot-blot test using a rabbit polyclonal antibody against these species, while high levels of β-1,3 glucan were detected with the commercial Fungitell assay. Despite the variations by sample, we concluded that all fungal macromolecules, that is, proteins, polysaccharides, and DNA, were present in blood from the MS patient which was analyzed. Several fungal species were identified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by sequencing. Antibodies against Candida spp. as well as C. famata-related antigens were also detected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Our findings provide support for the notion that disseminated mycosis is present in this patient.
    PMID: 21533622 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21533622
     
    waiting, alex3619, jepps and 6 others like this.
  2. Zach00

    Zach00

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    Thanks for sharing. This is interesting findings. I am a big believer that Fungal Infections are severely under-diagnosed and are one of the leading causes of MS, autoimmune diseases and even cancer.

    The testing and diagnostic capabilities available are horrible, and for the testing that is available most doctors will not run fungal antigen testing or check CSF fluid for these infections if you don't have an elevated WBC, which is pure idiocracry, as it has been proven time and time again that this does not have to be elevated in the face of any infection at all, even bacterial.

    Many years back i was extremely ill and was hospitalized for neuro problems and what looked like both infection and a damaging immune response to that infection. I had agreed to do a spinal tap but insisted that they check it for fungus as i strongly believed to have had a systemic fungal infection. Well despite my requests, none of this was checked simply because i was told "i do not have an elevated WBC count" I did have elevated protein but that did not matter and i was told the same ole line of bull... i could not have a fungal infection if i did not have a WBC so therefore they would not culture the fluid or check fungal antigens.

    Instead my problems were blamed on "an autoimmune". Right right,.. the good ole autoimmune from nothing. no trigger. Real logical! In any case there was some back and forth debate on this with the docs but ultimately the patient loses because god forbid he requests a test or has education and actual real experience.

    Well the long short of it is i remained sick for a quite some time after and eventually an ENT i was seeing found a very rare fungus in a sinus culture that i am absolutely sure had also spread to my meninges, causing subacute meningitis and chronic brain inflammation for years. Yes i did treat it and it did improve but only a little because i was only given orals for it and they would not give me IV since i did not have proof of it in meninges.

    Well thanks to the those docs for helping and working "with the patient", i have lived with chronic brain inflammation and neurological antibodies linked with encephalitis and other nasty diseases for many years now.

    Moral and take away from this... please insist on cultures and antigen testing when you feel it is appropriate and don't be a victim of someone elses lack of education and ignorance.
     
    osisposis likes this.
  3. osisposis

    osisposis Senior Member

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    I've dealt with pretty much the same and also continue to suffer. I've have had to find ways to cope because going to a doctor really , so far, has not been much help, I've learned that cool towels and ice pack around the neck and head can slow down the brain inflammation and I can fell it coming on so the faster I recognize it and use this treatment the better, I spend a lot of time with a cool wet washrag draped around my neck and shoulders. I also wash my sinuses with distilled water and sea salt when I fell the inflammation starting there, these two things have helped me a lot to deal until hopefully some day (soon!) the doctors catch up to what we all ready know and start actually listening and learning for a change.
     
  4. Jelly

    Jelly

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    What if the pathogenic fungus is not Candida albicans? I think that a lot of us are infected with a fungus called Sporothrix globosa, a recently identified subspecies of Sporothrix schenckii. Schenck grew Sporothrix on grape pulp at room temperature 120 years ago so it should be good enough for us today. It should still be grown in laboraries on dextrose agar at room temperature.

    You could try growing it on grape pulp (dextrose) at room temperature (20ish deg C). Stop using mouthwashes for a few days, then work up some saliva (not sputum because it is too warm) from your cheeks and spit it into a jar of grape pulp. The fungus is often present in oral, sinus, and ocular secretions. It seems to grow most vigorously on tissues cooled by ambient air temperature.

    WARNING: Sporothrix acts on grape pulp as brewer’s yeast does; makes lots of carbon dioxide, so don't use a jar with a screw top or it will explode. Make sure the jar is well ventilated.

    Sporothrix globosa stops growing at around 36.5 deg C so specimens cultured at 37 deg C (all specimens are cultured at 37 deg C) appear negative. It should be cultured at 35 deg C but pathologists don't bother.

    Furthermore it will grow en vivo at temperate latitudes but cannot grow en vivo at low altitude on the equator (where we are losing heat 24/7 to keep our core temp down to 37 deg C), so it could be involved in the pathogenesis of MS.

    It is also exhibits very low virulence in laboratory mice, so tell-tale signs of inflammation are absent. More worrying; another recently identified subspecies is Sporothrix albicans that exhibited zero virulence in mice. Laboratory mice only live for around 2 years so it could cause chronic disease in a long-lived human.

    This fungus ticks too many boxes for comfort.
     

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