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Food Sensitivities: Limit or Avoid Completely?

Discussion in 'Addressing Biotoxin, Chemical & Food Sensitivities' started by Lotus97, Feb 4, 2013.

?

I eat foods I'm sensitive to

  1. A few times a week

    28.6%
  2. A few times a month

    28.6%
  3. A few times a year

    35.7%
  4. Never

    7.1%
  1. " started getting so swollen that sitting with my legs up hurt because the pressure of my legs on the couch! "

    I have similar symptoms on whatever part of my body is getting the most fatigue. My butt if I'm (forward) sitting at the computer, If I lean on the back rest to take some weight off my butt, than it's my back. Laying in my bed with my laptop in my lap It would be the back of my head and to a certain extent my butt & my back.
    Back pain is not conventional, feels like I am going to have a heart attack, forces me to stop whatever I'm doing that causes it.
    As you intimated the symptoms seem to be more profound when I've had some type of reaction to food.

    My blood pressure drops way down and usually my heart rate goes up. (Symptom of food reactivity) So I'm wondering if the symptoms (your talking about) can't be provoked by a lack of blood flow in these areas which is exacerbated by the low blood pressure.

    Robert christ
  2. I try to completely avoid any food I think is making me sick but there's so many it's hard to tell which ones are making me sick. So I'm down to to very limited base diet of meat fried potatoes, & brown rice which I feel fairly confident I react to the least. I have to add some vegetables and some fruits periodically otherwise I'll become deficient, but it's really hard to tell how much these affect me because it seems the more I eat them the worse I get. In other words it seems to be cumulative for me which makes it very hard isolate a problem item, because by this time I've introduced more than one item.

    I do wonder if very carefully prescribed "challenges" might have some type of beneficial effect, similar to what allergist do for people with a hay fever.

    Before you could do this you have to isolate everything that makes you sick. Which seems almost impossible.

    Robert Christ
  3. brenda

    brenda Senior Member

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    I am thinking of doing the exclusion diet as I suspect salicylate sensitivity and possibly other things as well. According to one site, you should eat white rice, chicken and pears for two weeks then add one food at a time butnow I am worried about becoming hypersensitive to sal. I am working on personal hygeine products atm to get all sals out of them and then I will start on diet. I wonder if I should just go low rather than exclusion.
  4. maryb

    maryb Senior Member

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    That'd be difficult for me Brenda as I don't 'do' pears'!!
    Seriously though in my opinion you need to go exclusion first to get a measure of where you are at with certain foods, its the only way to do it.

    Once you are stable then what I do is eat foods I'm intolerant to every now and again, and then only in very small amounts - this way it seems I don't have the same full blown reaction. I am dairy,casein,gluten,egg, sugar free.
    But have lots of stuff I avoid as well, beans, peas, squash, sweet potatoes etc. luckily I can eat most meats, never processed though.
  5. brenda

    brenda Senior Member

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    Thanks for the tip. I am wondering whether to eat brown rice on the ex. diet as it has some sal. in and some are saying that if you come off that completely you get a horrendous reaction later if you get even a little bit. I have put this off for years but am going to bite the bullet :( First though I am reducing sal. products which is proving a nightmare to find a shampoo and cutting back on the highest sal. fruits and veg. So what did you eat for the exclusion phase?
  6. maryb

    maryb Senior Member

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    Well I was lucky in that I had several food panels done which identified a lot of my intolerances.I mean who would think eg. peas?
    Before this I was in a food prison of chicken, brocolli, carrots and brown rice. It was a nightmare.
  7. brenda

    brenda Senior Member

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    So you did not exclude salicylate when you went on the exclusion diet as brown rice carrots and broccoli contain it and also broccoli also contains oxalate so that was another common chemical in many foods that a lot of people have an intolerance to that you did not exclude.

    Salicytate is a kind of natural pesticide that is in most fruit and vegetables which sensitive people often develop intollerance to but I think it does not work like normal allergy.
  8. maryb

    maryb Senior Member

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    No I think mine was more about widening my choice of food and improving my massive reactions to some foods. As others say dizziness, feeling spaced out, need to sleep, stomach ache, nose and throat tingling within minutes of eating some stuff.
    Whether I'm also sensitive to salicytes I don't know I take a lot of aspirin - its the only pain killer that works.
    I don't eat anything with sulphites,nitrates or any preservatives that I know about though.

    Maybe one day I'll try to check whether I am sensitive to sal but for now.........
  9. Phil

    Phil

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    Personally I don't rely on any tests or food groups or what chemicals are in what foods. I eat the foods and see if I react. None of the theories I've heard of explain my reactions. There's only a few foods I can eat. For almost all of the time I've known I have been food reactive, I completely avoid the foods I'm reactive to. Very occasionally I eat the food as a test to see if I still react. Sometimes reactions to a food go away after a year or two. Usually they eventually come back. Most foods I rotate on a 5-7 day basis. Seven is better for me. The staple that I've been able to eat which is certain cuts of beef I have to eat multiple times of a day as there are so few other foods I can eat. It has never ever worked for me to try to acclimatize or slowly adjust or build resistance to a food. I either react or I don't and so I avoid.

    Not a desirable situation for sure - I guess I'm just suggesting be very very observant of the effects of what you eat and putting more reliance on those observations. At least that is what I've had to do. And yes that includes eating single foods at a meal and or having only one unknown at a meal. Last point, my reactions at least after my health fell to pieces where clear and easily discernible.
  10. Lotus97

    Lotus97 Senior Member

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    I found out recently that there's a protein in oats that's similar to gluten and so some people say you should also avoid oats even if they're "gluten-free". Does anyone else know about this? And do you avoid oats as much as wheat?
  11. MeSci

    MeSci Activity level: 6

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    Yes, oats contain avenins which are similar to gliadins, and some gluten-sensitive people are also sensitive to these.
  12. maryb

    maryb Senior Member

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    Yes I've tried gluten free oats and they give me the same symptoms as ordinary oats. I used to love oats - I was desperate to find some I could tolerate but sadly no.
  13. Lotus97

    Lotus97 Senior Member

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    When I found out that thing about oats my first thought wasn't "now I should also stop eating oats". It was actually "maybe I should eat more wheat":devil: I told that to my dad who is also avoiding gluten and he started laughing saying he was thinking the same thing. So far, me and my parents are still avoiding wheat, but still also eating some oats. I am trying to cut back on grains overall due to the caveman Paleo diet.

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