The 12th Invest in ME Research Conference June, 2017, Part 2
MEMum presents the second article in a series of three about the recent 12th Invest In ME International Conference (IIMEC12) in London.
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Food additive found in candy, gum could alter digestive cell structure and function

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by antares4141, Feb 17, 2017.

  1. antares4141

    antares4141 Senior Member

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    Truth or consequences, nm
  2. hixxy

    hixxy Senior Member

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    I've noticed this being used as an additive in some supplements. Thanks for the tip.
     
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  3. Webdog

    Webdog Senior Member

    Interesting. I wonder if this also applies to titanium dioxide, which is commonly found in sunscreens.
     
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  4. arewenearlythereyet

    arewenearlythereyet Senior Member

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    Titanium Dioxide is hardly ever used in the eu in any quantities in food and I've never heard of it being used in skimmed milk powder? I think if you used it in skimmed milk powder you would have to call it something like "coffee whitener" and avoid the word "milk". Confectionery does have different levels and types of colourings used....mainly for boiled sweets because of the high temperatures (all natural colours go brown).

    Just avoid eating a bucket load of gum and boiled sweets is the message I think. Classic unsubstantiated scaremongering on the scientists part. Probably to get their name on a paper. Waste of research money imo.
     
  5. hixxy

    hixxy Senior Member

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    Do you often ingest sunscreen?
     
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  6. antares4141

    antares4141 Senior Member

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    I think the article mentioned sunscreens, and also uses the terms titanium dioxide and titanium oxide. Not sure weather they are interchangeable or different. Searching wiki I find they don't have a listing for titanium oxide so my guess they are referencing or mean titanium dioxide, when they say titanium oxide.
     
  7. arewenearlythereyet

    arewenearlythereyet Senior Member

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    For food it's titanium dioxide
     
  8. Webdog

    Webdog Senior Member

    My understanding is that the nanoparticles used in sunscreen are small enough to penetrate cells.

    But other than the sunscreen on my lips, I'm not likely to ingest much titanium dioxide.

    The article seems to switch back and forth from talking about titanium oxide to titanium dioxide. Confusing. I was just curious is all.
     
  9. arewenearlythereyet

    arewenearlythereyet Senior Member

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    Depends how many cocktails you have on the beach?
     
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  10. antares4141

    antares4141 Senior Member

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    I am dubious of a lot of the articles that get posted in these science journals even one's I post. But they did show physiological changes in cell culture models. I don't think I would go as far as to say scaremonger unless their is a lot of bad peer review or something like that. Without a lot more research I think it's safe to say it's something most don't need to worry about.
    Me with all my gi issues I think I'm going to try to avoid it in the future anyways.
     
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  11. arewenearlythereyet

    arewenearlythereyet Senior Member

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    Yeah that's cool....I just get fed up with medical scientists smearing the food industry saying things like

    titanium dioxide, a common food additive found in everything from chewing gum to bread

    And

    Titanium oxide is a common food additive and people have been eating a lot of it for a long time


    My point was that it is wrong to fan up the problem by tapping into people's mistrust of food manufacturers. It's actually exaggerated and a throw away comment, probably to get the grant in the first place. It should be quite easy for you to avoid this evil ingredient since its hardly used in anything.
     

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