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Fingernail moons are back after 3 weeks of b12 etc

Discussion in 'Detox: Methylation; B12; Glutathione; Chelation' started by viggster, Nov 2, 2013.

  1. viggster

    viggster

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    During my 16-17 months of this illness, I had lost the lunulas (light-colored 'moons') on my fingernails. I did not really notice this until they came back recently. Their reappearance exactly coincides with the start of taking b12+ methylation supplements. Apparently the lack of lunulas is a sign of b12 deficiency. So I'd say the b12 is back - and let's hope it's working its magic on all of my neurological problems, too. I'll take it as a good sign.
  2. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

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    Interesting... I did not loose my lunulas for about 5 years.
    I started on daily sublingual B12 before that, I still don't have lunulas.

    But the B12 stopped my brain hurting and helped it start working.
    That's far more important than white bits on my nails.:thumbsup:
    Star-Anise and Valentijn like this.
  3. vamah

    vamah Senior Member

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    Interesting. I hadn't thought about it before, but I only have half moons on my thumbs now, none of the other fingers. I tried taking b12 some time ago,but it made me feel manic.
  4. SOC

    SOC Moderator and Senior Member

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    I have lunulas on thumbs only, too. Massive doses of B12 in all forms didn't change that. Maybe it's another aspect of methylation...?
  5. Little Bluestem

    Little Bluestem Senescent on the Illinois prairie, USA

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    Lunulas only on the thumbs here, too. I am taking MethlB12 and have taken adenosyB12. I have not done the full methylation protocol.
  6. Freddd

    Freddd Senior Member

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    There is (was?) a website on just that item. Just looking for ( fingernails b12 ) I find 246,000 estimated hits and it starts with the half moons.

    Mine are sizable on my thumb and get smaller until none visible on the pinkies. Years of b12 deficiency didn't change that but it sure made my nails thicker and tougher, as did each MeCbl, AdoCbl, Metafolin and LCF.
  7. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

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    My fingernails have become more and more soft and brittle and they split all the time.
    I've been on B12 for 7 years.
  8. Freddd

    Freddd Senior Member

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    Hi Peggy-sue,

    Obviously the presence or lack of something is causing lack of cell formation. Based on decades of debugging B12 and folate therapies these listed below make a decent checklist of why they don't work. I discovered early on that with each factor left to chance fewer than 5% would succeed with actually healing. My nails suddenly got thicker though it took some while for the newly formed parts to show up above the cuticle. Good luck.

    THE 95% REASONS B12 AND FOLATE THERAPIES FAIL
    Version 2.0 - 03/10/11, Version 2.1 - 05/08/11. Version 3.0 – 10/25/2012, Version 3.1 10/26/2012, Version 11/05/2012 3.2
    1) They take an inactive b12, either cyanob12 or hydroxyb12. The research validating their use was primarily for reducing blood cell size in Pernicious Anemia, keeping the serum b12 level over 300pg/ml at the end of the period between injections. They make a statistically significant effect that can be seen in lab tests in a significant percentage of people compared to placebo. They do not heal most damage done by active b12 deficiencies and have little or no effect on the vast majority of symptoms. They may even block active b12 from receptor sites hindering the effects of real b12. They both cause a keyhole effect of having only a very limited amount (estimated at 10-30mcg/day) that can actually be bound and converted to active forms. They in no way increase the level of unbound active cobalamins which appear required for most healing. They do nothing beneficial in a substantial percentage of people (20-40%) while giving the illusion that the problem is being treated and if it doesn’t work, oh well, that’s the accepted therapy. There is no dose proportionate healing with these inactive b12s because it all has to go through this keyhole. Some people are totally incapable of converting these to active forms because they lack the enzymes or ATP
    2) They take active b12 as an oral tablet reducing absorption to below 1%. A 1000mcg active b12 oral tablet might bind as much as 10mcg of b12. Again the b12 has to be squeezed through a keyhole that limits the amount and is subject to binding problems in the person whether genetic or acquired.3. They take a sublingual tablet of active b12 and chew it or slurp it down quickly reducing absorption back to that same 1% and limited to binding capacity. With sublingual tablets absorption is proportionate to time in contact with tissues. I performed a series of absorption tests comparing sublingual absorption to injection via hypersensitive response and urine colorimetry.
    3) Of the many brands of sublingual methylb12 only some are very effective. Some are completely ineffective and some have a little effect.
    4) For injectable methylb12, if it is exposed to too much light (very little light actually is too much) it breaks down. Broken down methylb12 is hydroxyb12. It doesn’t work at healing brain/cord problems of those who have a presumed low CSF cobalamin level. That requires a flood of unbound methylb12 and adenosylb12 (2 separate deficiencies) that can enter by diffusion. Adenosylb12 from sublinguals can ride along with injected methylb12.
    5) They don’t take BOTH active b12s.
    6) They don’t take enough active b12s for the purpose.
    7) Lack of methylfolate
    8) Lack of sufficient Methylfolate, a dose can start more healing than the same dose can complete.
    9) Paradoxical Folate Deficiency - Folic acid is taken which can block at least 10 times as much methylfolate from being active inducing folate deficiency even if methylfolate is also taken. These induced deficiency symptoms are often called "detox" symptoms. Folinic acid is taken which can block at least 10-20 times as much methylfolate from being active inducing folate deficiency even if methylfolate is also taken. These induced deficiency symptoms are often called "detox" symptoms.
    10) Lack of l-carnitine fumarate (rarely ALCAR), the 4th of the Deadlock Quartet
    11) Lack of other critical cofactors.
    12) Lack of basic cofactors
    13) Glutathione, glutathione direct precursors, NAC and /or whey is taken causing what is often called "detox" while actually being induced folate and b12 deficiencies.
    14) Having many additional supplements and herbs of unknown interactions and effects.
  9. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

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    I use Solgar sublingual B12, "cyanocobalmin prep."

    It stopped my brain from "hurting" when I tried to listen or think from about 30 minutes after my first tablet.
    I improved to a level I could read an easy book, and follow a (simple-ish) tv programme an hour long..
    It did wonders for me.
    That symptom hardly ever comes back now - 7 years on.
    It is doing me a heck of a lot of good.
    I do keep the thing under my tongue for as long as I possibly can. I do know 40 minutes is ideal.

    I don't get tests for anything. I just use a few supplements which I have found help, by trial and error.
    I am not doing any protocols or methylation stuff. I'm really not sure about any of it.
    I pace, I use the things I know help.
    B12
    EPA + EPO (Vegepa)
    Mg citrate (balanced with calcium and vitD)
    Zinz (+ vitC)
    and phytosterols for cholesterol.

    I occassionally use Solgar Carnitine complex to ward off payback when I'm overdoing things, but simply can't afford it all the time.

    I'm on painkillers for sciatica. I am having to swallow grams of useless paracetamol daily in order to get the codeine I need.

    I think having to deal with all that poison is not doing me any good at all. I am taking milk thistle to try to alleviate some of the potential damage it is doing.

    Thanks for all that info. Fredddd:thumbsup:
  10. Crux

    Crux Senior Member

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    Hi @peggy-sue ;

    In hopes that this may at all be useful to you, I found that taking more B12 stopped my sciatica. I take 10mgs. of Enzymatic Therapy, and 6mgs. of Perque hydroxocobalamin daily. This is a high dose, and most folks won't need this much, but I'll do almost anything to avoid the pain.

    Sometimes, with low iron, fingernails can become soft and brittle. This can happen in hypothyroid as well.

    Also, my lunulae returned after increasing the B12.
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2013
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  11. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

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    I did recently increase to taking 2 tablets a day. :thumbsup:
    They're affordable.

    My sciatica is caused by one leg being "functionally" :rolleyes: shorter than the other.
    (I suspect something wonky in my lower back or hips, but that hasn't been looked at.)
    I do not believe is it my imagination or psychosomatic. I am two different heights, depending on which leg I stand on.
    I'm waiting for an NHS physiotherapy appointment....


    ...and waiting...
    Little Bluestem likes this.
  12. Crux

    Crux Senior Member

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    Good on you peggy-sue! :thumbsup:
    peggy-sue likes this.
  13. Lou

    Lou Senior Member

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    Hi peggy-sue,

    Have you tried putting something in heel of shoe that goes to the shorter leg? You don't want to put a rock in there (ha) but perhaps enough shoe liners ( cut off at the heel) to equalize height.

    I don't know anything about sciatica, but it just seems this would be a basic step, and a more even one at that. Pardon if I'm off base.
    peggy-sue likes this.
  14. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

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    I've got a small riser in one shoe, which helps a bit, but it's not really high enough.
    I did spend a couple of months wearing one bright lime green clog and one bright red one, because one had a heel an inch higher than the other.:)

    Thanks for your kind thoughts, Lou!:love:
    Lou likes this.
  15. Lou

    Lou Senior Member

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    The two colors, that is hilarious! Would liked to have seen that.
  16. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

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    It didn't really look much out of place, not on me...:balloons::redface:
    Lou and Crux like this.

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