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Filgotinib (JAK1 inhibitor) future of CFS/ME treatment?

Discussion in 'Antivirals, Antibiotics and Immune Modulators' started by Jesse2233, Sep 10, 2017.

  1. Jesse2233

    Jesse2233 Senior Member

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    Filgotinib is a Janus kinase inhibitor with selectivity for subtype JAK1 of this enzyme due for release in 2019.

    It is rumored that Dr Kenny De Meirleir has his eye on it as a way to break the inflammatory cascade he believes is behind CFS/ME. The drug has also been discussed on various investment forums as a potential CFS/ME treatment.

    It is currently undergoing clinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease.

    Does anyone have more information on this drug? Or have a clear understanding of how its mechanism of action might be helpful?
     
  2. Jesse2233

    Jesse2233 Senior Member

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    More on JAK1
     
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  3. Marc_NL

    Marc_NL asjemenou

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    Do you have a link?
    On investment forums I saw it discussed on the official indications mentioned here:
    http://www.glpg.com/clinical-pipelines

    I've seen it discussed on ME / Lyme forums in relation to ME.



    You might also find @Twazzle 's post interesting when he talks about it at the end:
    http://forums.phoenixrising.me/inde...ointment-with-dr-kdm.50270/page-5#post-899083


    .
     
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  4. Jesse2233

    Jesse2233 Senior Member

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    Thanks @Marc_NL

    From @Twazzle's post...

    "The goal of KDM’s treatment is to attempt to break the cycle which is happening in the intestines by correcting the dysbiosis using pulsed antibiotics/probiotics. In continually removing the source of the inflammation (the excess LPS caused by the SIBO), the immune system over time will allowed a chance to normalise and eventually be able to take care of the problem itself.

    This is easier said than done however as the SIBO comes back very quickly after the course of antibiotics, especially in sufferers who have been sick for a long time as the biofilms are better established/there is usually greater degree of inflammation & tight junction breakdown.

    There is hope for us all in the future however as a new breed of genetic medicines are due to hit the market in 2019 for Rheumatoid Arthritis/Crohns, if given regulatory approval. They inhibit the JAK enzyme which is responsible for inducing inflammation in the body/gut. The hope is in that inhibiting the JAK 1 /STAT 3 pathway that the dendritic cells in the gut will be extinguished and intestinal immunity will be given chance to normalise. This will attenuate the translocation of LPS, the immune system will shift back to TH1 and systemic inflammation will eventually die down allowing healing/recovery to occur."
     
  5. Jesse2233

    Jesse2233 Senior Member

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    boombachi and Marc_NL like this.
  6. Marc_NL

    Marc_NL asjemenou

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    @Jesse2233
    Thanks, I just googled and found the exact same discussion ;)
     
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  7. Marky90

    Marky90 Science breeds knowledge, opinion breeds ignorance

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    Meirleir has a lot of drugs but no data..
     
  8. Aubry

    Aubry

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    I heard KDM is going to test this JAK inhibitor on USA patients in 2018 ?
     
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  9. Jesse2233

    Jesse2233 Senior Member

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    Really? He'll be part of a trial?
     
  10. Twazzle

    Twazzle

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    Where did you hear this?

    Also, there is another JAK1 inhibitor drug called upadacinib (AbbieVie) which I have seen is under investigation for numerous inflammatory conditions.

    From what I have read it is has a similar effectiveness to filgotinib, although it does express more affinity for JAK2 than filgotinib. This is seen as a negative as inhibiting Jak2 could have a negative impact on hemoglobin and the amount of NK cells which potentially limits the dose. The phase 3 results it has posted so far however (for RA) have been positive.
     
  11. Jesse2233

    Jesse2233 Senior Member

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    Yes JAK2 inhibition seems to be where many of the adverse reported side effects of Tofacitinib (Xeljanz) comes from
     

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