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Fibromyalgia Imaging Study Shows Unique Brain Connectivity

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia' started by osisposis, Feb 16, 2015.

  1. osisposis

    osisposis Senior Member

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    Medscape Medical News
    Fibromyalgia Imaging Study Shows Unique Brain Connectivity
    Jenni Laidman
    February 10, 2015

    [QUOTE
    A new brain imaging study reveals that patients with fibromyalgia (FM) show unique brain activity in response to pain.
    The patients had increased connectivity between the primary region of the brain that recognizes touch,
    the S1 somatosensory cortex, and a second region that assigns salience to stimuli, the anterior insula.

    The results suggest "a neurobiological substrate for evoked pain hypersensitivity in FM," the authors report.

    In the study, published online January 26 in Arthritis & Rheumatology

    This paper highlights the fact that the somatosensory cortex and connectivity to the insula
    related to pain administered in the study is also related to clinical pain," Dr Harris told Medscape Medical News.
    "This suggests that the fMRI outcome is also related to clinical pain."
    ][/QUOTE]
    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/839524


    abstract

    The somatosensory link: S1 functional connectivity is altered by sustained
    pain and associated with clinical/autonomic dysfunction in fibromyalgia

    [QUOTE
    Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that both somatic and non-somatic dysfunction in FM, including clinical pain,
    pain catastrophizing, autonomic dysfunction, and amplified temporal summation, are all closely linked with the
    degree to which evoked deep-tissue pain alters S1 connectivity to salience/affective pain processing regions.
    Additionally, diminished connectivity between S1 subregions at REST in FM may result from ongoing
    widespread clinical pain. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    ][/QUOTE]

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/art.39043/abstract
     
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  2. osisposis

    osisposis Senior Member

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    Fibromyalgia Pain Related To Diminished Connectivity Between Brain Areas – Study

    [QUOTE
    The researchers found communication impairment between thalamus and premotor areas, between the right insula
    and primary sensorimotor areas, and between supramarginal and prefrontal areas in FM patients,
    and sensitivity of individual subjects o painful pressure was associated with increased connectivity
    between pain-related regions (for example the insula and thalamus) and midline regions of the default mode network
    (including posterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex) among FM patients compared with controls
    ][/QUOTE]

    http://fibromyalgianewstoday.com/20...ed-diminished-connectivity-brain-areas-study/
     
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  3. A.B.

    A.B. Senior Member

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    I have been wondering about this type of brain study lately: correlation or causation? Wouldn't constantly experiencing pain have some impact on the brain?
     
  4. adreno

    adreno PR activist

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    I think we cannot speak of causation at this point. All we know is that there is an association between increased levels of/sensitivity towards pain, and brain changes. So far, this is not surprising.

    And yes, it is clear to me that constantly experiencing pain for prolonged periods would cause changes in the brain. OTOH, changes in the brain could likely also cause increased sensitivity to pain. But why would these changes take place in the brain without peripheral stimulation? Unless some people are somehow "hardwired" towards this from an early age.
     
  5. osisposis

    osisposis Senior Member

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    inhalation exposure to toxins/chemicals, VOC's, airways, nose/sinus> CNS,atomic, nerve damage
    kindling,danger singals, oxidative stress, mast cells, inflammation
     
  6. Woolie

    Woolie Senior Member

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    I don't think this study has shown anything except that these participants have recently experienced genuine pain.

    Look at this line:
    "Interestingly, S1 connectivity is also sensitive to sustained experimental pain stimulation in healthy adults (5), suggesting malleable state-like properties for S1 connectivity networks"

    In other words, connectivity between S1 and anterior/middle insula in response to pain stimulation is a function of how much pain you have just experienced.

    I also worry that this "its all in your brain" type of hypothesis is not too far from a psychiatric account. What it essentially implies is that there's no real bodily source of the pain, and its all in the mental interpretation. I don't know a whole lot about FM, but it seems to me more likely that the pain has a source outside the brain.
     
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  7. PennyIA

    PennyIA Senior Member

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    This worries me as well. Hopefully if causation can be found and the changes they are seeing is an effect, it will serve a good purpose.

    I haven't been diagnosed with fibro, but my mom suffered with it for years before she passed away... and even my step-father (who was actually pretty good to her)... still states things like "she was just overly sensitive and couldn't handle life any more"... as if it was a decision to experience pain if the clothing you wore wasn't super soft, or if the weight of the blankets would trigger pain.

    Last thing I want to see is more fodder for it being something that is related to psychiatric issues.
     
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  8. osisposis

    osisposis Senior Member

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    it's TBI ! not psychiatric
     
  9. adreno

    adreno PR activist

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    Hyperconnectivity isn't TBI, it's quite the opposite. It likely shows that a pathway of the brain has been "overused", which causes the pathway to hyperconnect.

    I think @Woolie is right that these findings could possibly be used by psychs to argue for "brain retraining", instead of looking for the peripheral factors that likely cause the overstimulation of the brain pathway.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2015
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  10. Sidereal

    Sidereal Senior Member

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    These "central sensitisation" theories are just a restatement of psychosomatic theories of the 1980s-1990s in more neurobabbly language. It is far more likely that FM pain originates in the periphery (muscle) and that the brain rewiring occurs as a consequence of constant pain signals reaching it.
     
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  11. Woolie

    Woolie Senior Member

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    Yes, I suspect so too, @Sidereal. I think we'll be seeing more of psychogenic illness theories getting a makeover through the use of neuroimaging language. Its terribly hard to interpret a lot of these effects, which leaves lots of room for people to use them any way they wish.
     
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  12. osisposis

    osisposis Senior Member

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    done any research on TBI vs. PTSD lately?
     
  13. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

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    What is TBI?

    I've certainly heard of a neural process called kindling, which hypersensitises aspects of pain.

    There have been studies done on babies who had to undergo serious and severe treatments to save their lives at birth - loads of needles, catheters, tests and surgical stuff.

    The findings were that babies exposed to excessive pain grew up to be hyper-sensitive to pain.

    Sorry, no reference. Just something that I read and was very interested in - probably an article from Medscape - I get updates on pain research.
     
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  14. osisposis

    osisposis Senior Member

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    What is TBI?

    I've certainly heard of a neural process called kindling, which hypersensitises aspects of pain.

    There have been studies done on babies who had to undergo serious and severe treatments to save their lives at birth - loads of needles, catheters, tests and surgical stuff.

    The findings were that babies exposed to excessive pain grew up to be hyper-sensitive to pain.

    Sorry, no reference. Just something that I read and was very interested in - probably an article from Medscape - I get updates on pain research.[/QUOTE]

     
  15. osisposis

    osisposis Senior Member

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    [/QUOTE]

     
  16. osisposis

    osisposis Senior Member

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  17. Woolie

    Woolie Senior Member

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    @osisposis, sorry you're hurt by the discussion, and I won't post any more comments. But thanks for sharing the paper.

    If you have had a TBI in the past, I'm very sorry to hear it - I've worked with young people who've suffered severe TBI (mainly from car accidents) and I can't think of anything more devastating.
     
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  18. adreno

    adreno PR activist

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    I am sorry too, if you have been mistreated @osisposis. TBI can certainly be a cause of chronic pain, along with many other problems.

    TBI, as you probably know, are lesions in the brain,caused by trauma. The present study does not relate to this. It shows increased connectivity (thicker nerve fiber bundles) in one region of the brain.

    Connections in the brain typically increase with use. However, I will not rule out the possibility that genetics, or environmental factors can be involved in how the brain is wired.

    Finally, TBI can cause rewiring of the brain. As some connections are severed, others can be strengthened. However, it is doubtful that all or even most patients with ME/CFS/FM are victims of TBI.
     
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  19. osisposis

    osisposis Senior Member

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    your both fine, like I said , it's nothing new to me, but if you deside to look into it you can find a relationship between toxin exposure and TBI, I had all the symptoms of TBI, I was diagnosed with PTSD right after my exposure and put on disability, my family doctor gave me ear drops for what he didn't take seriously enough was CSF leaking out my nose and ears, yep, suffered menningitis. this was 2001 in Mo. and here at that time if you even mentioned the word mold the doctors told you that you were crazy, mold couldn't hurt anyone, well, now they have been proved wrong. the route of infection was sinus>brain, dura matter and yep it missed me up pretty bad.
    adreno, I'm fully aware that most are not damaged to this severity like I said, I was the member of another group for a long time. but I'm also very aware that most do not get proper diagnoses and quick diagnoses and that is a biggy and yep some have been damaged this bad, I know a few and it can be very easy to mistake CSF coming out your nose for just a runny nose exspecially when your getting sick in a moldy home and haveing cold and flu like symptoms , the fact it was coming out my ears too however gave me the insight that it was not a runny nose. my brain has suffered, I would try to carry on a conversation and switch in the middle to a tottally different subject, people would ask me something and when I spoke the answer had nothing to do with the question they asked, I even caught some of this myself but mostly didnt know I was doing stuff like that untill people told me, I was in lalaland for a long time.amazeing that one can suffer menningitis and with these cold/flu like symptoms going on how easily that can be missed, personally I think thats a biggy that many haven't even considered.
     
  20. osisposis

    osisposis Senior Member

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