New Atmosphere, New Vision: Gibson and Whittemore Kick Off Invest in ME Conference 2016
Mark Berry reports on Dr. Gibson's introduction and Dr. Whittemore's keynote speech, at the 11th Invest in ME International ME Conference in London.
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Fatigue Scales and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Issues of Sensitivity and Specificity

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Dolphin, Feb 12, 2011.

  1. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,636
    Likes:
    28,050
    The full text of this is available for free at:
    http://www.dsq-sds.org/article/view/1375/1540

     
  2. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,636
    Likes:
    28,050
    2nd part of this study shows the problems with empiric criteria (Reeves et al., 2005)

    The 2nd part of this study shows the problems with empiric criteria (Reeves et al., 2005).

    This part (part 2) is basically the same data that is in:
    but is now available in open access form.
     
  3. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,636
    Likes:
    28,050
    One way this paper can be put into practice

    One way this paper can be put into practice
    (I checked the original paper and there are actually 7 items in the full scale. The other two are: "Muscle weakness even after resting" and "Limbs feel heavy when not moving them": link: http://www.dsq-sds.org/article/view/938/1113
     
  4. WillowJ

    WillowJ คภภเє ɠรค๓թєl

    Messages:
    3,763
    Likes:
    4,842
    WA, USA
    good find, Dolphin. I will have a look when I can
     
  5. WillowJ

    WillowJ คภภเє ɠรค๓թєl

    Messages:
    3,763
    Likes:
    4,842
    WA, USA
    Very good point. Thanks so much, Jason & team!

    Ax, S., Gregg, V. H., & Jones, D. (1997). Chronic fatigue syndrome: Sufferers' evaluation of medical support. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, 90, 250-254.
     
  6. CBS

    CBS Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,502
    Likes:
    845
    Dolphin,

    Thanks for the post. I have to say, I'm not surprised by the findings. While I am a huge fan of Jason and his team, I think we're wasting our time focusing on fatigue.

    I am going to say this until it sinks in - Most of us are tired but not fatigued. We do not meet the criteria for fatigue as it is traditionally defined in physiological research (Alan Light - CFSAC; Oct, 2010). Fatigue as it is used by the CDC in their name "CFS" is done so in the most general poorly defined popular sense (and in a manner that is consistent with depression). Those of us that meet the Canadian Consensus Dx criteria couldn't get into a CDC study (quite literally for the life of us) if we tried.

    The best outcome of this study would be if it served to move the focus off of fatigue and on to the other increasingly well documented biomarkers.

    WE MUST STOP USING THE WORD FATIGUE UNLESS WE"RE TALKING ABOUT A CDC DEFINITION OR A CDC STUDY!
     
  7. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,636
    Likes:
    28,050
    While I agree that fatigue is not a great term, to screen for studies for the time being, researchers are likely to continue to use questionnaires.
    And even if the Light study works out, there may be continue to be cases where one wouldn't put people through exercise tests for a study.

    The study found that there were lots of problems with most of the fatigue scales.
    So this study can be used to say that if researchers are using a questionnaire to help diagnose patients (the Canadian criteria are even questionnaires), the part of the ME/CFS Fatigue Types Questionnaire that asks about post-exertional symptoms e.g.

    can be useful.

    Also, even if some people switch to readily used biomarkers, some "bad guys" may not and we can challenge questionnares they use.
     
  8. WillowJ

    WillowJ คภภเє ɠรค๓թєl

    Messages:
    3,763
    Likes:
    4,842
    WA, USA
    I agree that fatigue as usually defined in medicine does NOT describe us. Most medical dictionaries describe fatigue as a tiredness which is not related to physical ability to carry out activity. Obviously that has nothing to do with us, at least not the part that makes us so disabled.

    However, I think this is what Jason et al. are getting at here. We don't have the fatigue they (ppl in general, researchers in general) were thinking of. We have a totally different nature of "fatigue."

    But I agree with your point, too... yes, let's not say fatigue.

    Last time I did that in my doctor's office, though (insisted I had weakness rather than fatigue), she diagnosed me with "tiredness" and didn't credit my CFS diagnosis. On the other hand, maybe that's a useful diagnosis in the pre-legitimate era for ME/CFS.

    If she was using 780.79, that's

     

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page