The 12th Invest in ME Research Conference June, 2017, Part 2
MEMum presents the second article in a series of three about the recent 12th Invest In ME International Conference (IIMEC12) in London.
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Fatigue in an adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder population: A trans-diagnostic approach

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by hixxy, Dec 6, 2016.

  1. hixxy

    hixxy Senior Member

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    Br J Clin Psychol. 2016 Dec 5. doi: 10.1111/bjc.12119. [Epub ahead of print]

    Fatigue in an adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder population: A trans-diagnostic approach

    Rogers DC, Dittner AJ, Rimes KA, Chalder T.

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVES:
    Trans-diagnostic approaches suggest that key cognitive and behavioural processes maintain symptoms across a wide range of mental health disorders. Fatigue is a common clinical feature of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adulthood; however, empirical data supporting its prevalence are lacking. This study aimed to collate outcomes from outpatient services to (1) investigate the prevalence of fatigue in adults with ADHD, (2) examine symptoms of ADHD in adults with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), and (3) consider secondary clinical characteristics common to both disorder groups.

    METHODS:
    Measures of self-reported fatigue were compared across groups of adults with ADHD (N = 243), CFS (N = 86), and healthy controls (HC) (N = 211) using a between-subjects cross-sectional design. Groups were also compared on secondary clinical measures of functional impairment, mood, anxiety, sleep, self-efficacy, and their beliefs about the acceptability of expressing emotions.

    RESULTS:
    The ADHD group were significantly more fatigued than HC with 62% meeting criteria for fatigue caseness. ADHD symptoms were significantly greater in the CFS group than in HC. ADHD and CFS groups did not differ significantly on measures of functional impairment, mood, and self-efficacy. No significant differences were detected on measures of anxiety when items relating to physical restlessness were removed from the analysis.

    CONCLUSIONS:
    Adults with ADHD experience greater fatigue than HC. Adults with CFS and ADHD share many trans-diagnostic clinical characteristics, including difficulties with low mood, anxiety, and reduced self-efficacy, which impact upon their overall functioning. Further research is required to investigate extraneous factors mediating fatigue severity in these clinical groups.

    PRACTITIONER POINTS:
    Fatigue is a common clinical feature of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adulthood. Evidence-based interventions for chronic fatigue syndrome could be adapted to address fatigue in ADHD in adults.

    © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

    KEYWORDS:
    attention deficit hyperactivity disorder; chronic fatigue; trans-diagnostic

    PMID: 27918087
    DOI: 10.1111/bjc.12119

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27918087
     
    Valentijn, Esther12, AndyPR and 2 others like this.
  2. mfairma

    mfairma Senior Member

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    It's nice to have this forum. Whenever I'm feeling particularly wasteful, I can just logon and see how much garbage other people create.
     
    Solstice, A.B., Valentijn and 7 others like this.
  3. Webdog

    Webdog Senior Member

    I was diagnosed with adult ADHD (Predominantly Inattentive Type) for nearly 10 years by 2 different doctors, after short symptom questionnaires. The same two doctors also missed that I had ME/CFS, and were bluntly dismissive of my complaints about worsened neuro/immune symtoms and other intolerable side effects from the prescribed stimulants.

    Recent neurocognitive testing shows that I do not, in fact, have adult ADHD (no surprise there). But I do have the usual cognitive deficits associated with ME/CFS: problems with working memory and concentration, slowed processing speed, significant decrease in cognitive performance without frequent breaks, visual processing deficits, etc.

    My case, of course, is anecdotal. But I wonder if there isn't a large group of patients with other conditions misdiagnosed with adult ADHD.

    It's certainly possible there are more ME/CFS patients misdiagnosed with adult ADHD than actually diagnosed with ME/CFS. After all, roughly 8 out of 9 ME/CFS patients are currently undiagnosed (per IoM report).

    I wonder how many in this study have had proper testing to rule out other causes of cognitive dysfunction? I wonder if this adult ADHD study might have a significantly heterogeneous patient cohort, similar to the useless "Oxford Definition" studies in CFS?

    More questions than answers, I suppose.
     
    JohnM, Solstice, Cheshire and 4 others like this.
  4. mfairma

    mfairma Senior Member

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    That may be @Webdog. It's an interesting question, though I doubt this study can say anything useful on that subject.

    It's amazing how driven they are to insert their tentacles into every little nook and cranny possible. CBT/GET, the universal cure.
     
  5. drob31

    drob31 Senior Member

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    I don't understand ?
     
  6. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    It's hard to feel bad about oneself when there are people like Chalder out there.
     
    Valentijn likes this.
  7. mfairma

    mfairma Senior Member

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    I was being a bit literal. I had just taken out the trash and was thinking about all the waste we create, then logged on to see this. Guess my joke could have been a bit clearer.
     
    alkt likes this.
  8. soti

    soti Senior Member

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    I also had an ADHD diagnosis before the ME/CFS (well, "CFS" :bang-head:) diagnosis. One thing that I think confounds the doctors is that the stimulant drugs tended to help, at least short-term. However, I did much better on things to promote quality of sleep, which confused the poor things. I think it's a good question to see what's happening with ADHD diagnosis in PWME. No confidence in Chalder's ability to figure it out though. It would be a nice avenue for Leonard Jason and his group to study.
     
  9. Sean

    Sean Senior Member

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    Desperately trying to expand the empire before it is too late.
     
    hixxy and ukxmrv like this.
  10. wastwater

    wastwater Senior Member

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    I think there is an attention deficit in me/cfs I'm not sure if it is ADHD though as I struggle with stimulation from anti depressants and couldn't see myself tolerating stimulants
     
  11. halcyon

    halcyon Senior Member

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    LOL. How to build a house of cards on top of another house of cards.
     
  12. Jonathan Edwards

    Jonathan Edwards "Gibberish"

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    Lying in bed in an adult low back pain population: A trans-diagnostic approach
    Rogues D, Ditties A, Rhymes K, Cardigan B.

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVES:
    Trans-diagnostic approaches suggest that key cognitive and behavioural processes maintain symptoms across a wide range of mental health disorders. Lying in bed is a common clinical feature of low back pain disorder (LBPD) in adulthood; however, empirical data supporting its prevalence are lacking. This study aimed to collate outcomes from outpatient services to (1) investigate the prevalence of lying in bed in adults with LBPD, (2) examine symptoms of LBPD in adults with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), and (3) consider secondary clinical characteristics common to both disorder groups.

    METHODS:
    Ask the patients leading questions.

    RESULTS:
    What we wanted to find.

    CONCLUSIONS:
    Adults with LBPD experience greater lying in bed than HC. Adults with CFS and LBPD share many trans-diagnostic clinical characteristics, including difficulties with low mood, anxiety, and reduced self-efficacy, which impact upon their overall functioning. Further research is required to investigate extraneous factors mediating lying in bed severity in these clinical groups.

    PRACTITIONER POINTS:
    Lying in bed is a common clinical feature of low back pain disorder in adulthood. Evidence-based interventions for chronic fatigue syndrome could be adapted to address lying in bed in LBPD in adults.
     
  13. daisybell

    daisybell Senior Member

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    JohnM, hixxy, Valentijn and 3 others like this.
  14. Jonathan Edwards

    Jonathan Edwards "Gibberish"

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    I think Limbo Medicine might take it. Then there's always the Journal Of Irreproducible Results.
     
    actup, ukxmrv and BurnA like this.
  15. BurnA

    BurnA Senior Member

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    I'm sure The Lancet would take it too.
     

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