1. Patients launch $1.27 million crowdfunding campaign for ME/CFS gut microbiome study.
    Check out the website, Facebook and Twitter. Join in donate and spread the word!
Hunting down the cause of ME/CFS & other challenging disorders - Lipkin in London
In a talk to patients in London on 3rd September, Dr. W. Ian Lipkin described the extraordinary lengths he and his team are prepared to go to in order to track down the source of an illness, with examples ranging from autism to the strange case of Kawasaki disease.
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Exposure to Maternal Antibodies Affects Behavior, Researchers Find

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Overstressed, Jul 10, 2013.

  1. Overstressed

    Overstressed Senior Member

    Messages:
    402
    Likes:
    126
    Belgium
    July 9, 2013 — Researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute have found that prenatal exposure to specific combinations of antibodies found only in mothers of children with autism leads to changes in the brain that adversely affect behavior and development.

    The researchers said that the highly specific immunoglobulin-G (IgG) autoantibodies cross the placenta during pregnancy to impact fetal brain development, resulting in a form of autism that the researchers now are calling maternal antibody-related (MAR) autism. The researchers said that MAR autism cases could represent as much as 23 percent of all autism cases.
    The research is published online today in Translational Psychiatry, a Nature journal.

    During gestation, maternal IgG antibodies normally cross the placenta and protect the fetus, conferring the mother's immunities to the developing child. However, in addition to protective antibodies, autoantibodies that react to fetal proteins can also cross the placenta, essentially attacking fetal tissue.
    The current study is an extension of an earlier study conducted in 2008. It explores the effects of the autism-specific IgG antibodies in a non-human primate model. Non-human primates live in complex social groups and use many forms of social communication. In addition, portions of the human brain, such as the prefrontal cortex, are poorly developed in other animal models, such as rodents, but are highly developed in the rhesus monkey.

    Read the rest of the article here.

    Journal Reference:
    M D Bauman, A-M Iosif, P Ashwood, D Braunschweig, A Lee, C M Schumann, J Van de Water, D G Amaral. Maternal antibodies from mothers of children with autism alter brain growth and social behavior development in the rhesus monkey. Translational Psychiatry, 2013; 3 (7): e278 DOI: 10.1038/tp.2013.47
     
    Valentijn likes this.

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page