Invest in ME Conference 12: First Class in Every Way
OverTheHills wraps up our series of articles on this year's 12th Invest in ME International Conference (IIMEC12) in London with some reflections on her experience as a patient attending the conference for the first time.
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Evidence of Study Design Biases in Randomized Trials: Systematic Review of Meta-Epidemiological Stud

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Dolphin, Oct 8, 2016.

  1. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    Free: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0159267

     
    TiredSam, Simon, alkt and 7 others like this.
  2. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    [Sarcasm] Subjective outcomes have more bias than objective ones? Blinding is important? Isn't this news like a century old? Most of science changed to entirely objective outcomes mid 20th century, its time the rest caught up. Subjective outcomes can help nuance results, but are not reliable in themselves.
     
  3. Sidereal

    Sidereal Senior Member

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    Paging Dr Vogt...
     
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  4. A.B.

    A.B. Senior Member

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    There seems to be a larger failure to teach good scientific methods in some parts of medicine and psychology.

    If you're cynical like me, you might even say that some fields of study are intentionally avoiding good methods because they cannot produce positive results with them.
     
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  5. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    I think that is part of it. I also think that psychiatry has been given a free pass because its difficult to do good objective research in dealing with the brain. Until psychiatry can get over this issue it will only advance slowly if at all. Not all of psychiatric and psychological research has such issues though ... just way too much of it.
     
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  6. Jonathan Edwards

    Jonathan Edwards Senior Member

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    Indeed. In fact it seems hard to call it news when blinding itself was introduced because the problem was obvious in advance to anyone who had actually tried doing an experiment. It seems a bit like discovering that gardeners get more thorns in their hands if they do not wear gloves - and surprisingly particularly if they are handling roses.

    The fact that this gets published seems as A.B. says to be a worrying sign that a large number of people in biomedical science these days do not have a basic education in methodology.

    On the other hand it is quite interesting to see the obvious actually being measured. It would have indeed been interesting if it turned out not to be the case - i.e. that there has never been any point in wearing gloves when you prune roses whatever one might think.
     
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  7. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    This is an important point. Much of medicine lacks a sound evidence base, and at least some of that is because things are so darn obvious nobody has bothered. The more the obvious is nailed down and demonstrated the better, as we can have more confidence in even more of medicine at its fundamentals. It must also be kept in mind that every now and then something that is obviously "right" in medicine, and science in general, is disproved.
     
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