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Ever try fibrinolytic enzymes for hypercoagulation?

Discussion in 'General Treatment' started by drob31, Mar 20, 2015.

  1. drob31

    drob31 Senior Member

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    This is something I've been investigating quite heavily since I have antiphosphilipid antibodies which cause hypercoagulation. This is actually a common occurance in CFS, according to Dr. Enlander:

    "In November 1999, myself and Dr. Joe Brewer (an Infectious Disease specialist in Kansas City) developed the model of a pathogen activating the immune and coagulation systems which is now known as the Immune System Activation of Coagulation or ISAC. The end result is increased blood viscosity which is due to 1) a regulatory protein defect and 2) activation of the coagulation system by the pathogen. As the blood viscosity increases, the blood flow diminishes throughout the body, creating anoxia (lack of oxygen) and nutrient deprivation within various areas of the body. This is like trying to start your car in Wisconsin in the winter with 60-weight engine oil. This also explains why the low dose heparin therapy is effective by increasing blood flow as the blood viscosity decreases. Thus, patients gain relief from their symptoms with this therapy.

    The model states that coagulation activation generates thrombin, which converts fibrinogen to soluble fibrin monomer (SFM). Soluble fibrin becomes deposited in the microcirculation (capillaries) as fibrin or fibrinoid-like deposition, blocking oxygen and nutrients to nearby tissues. Many pathogens activate the immune system. These include viruses (such as EBV, CMV, HHV6 & others), bacteria (mycoplasma, chlamydia, borrelia, etc.), fungi (such as candida), etc. These pathogens are anaerobes, i.e., they live and reproduce in an oxygen deprived cellular matrix or environment. That’s why fibrin deposition becomes important to the survival of the pathogens because it produces decreased oxygen in cells and tissues. One of the biggest challenges of a clinician faces is to figure out what pathogens are present in the patient, and therefore determine the most appropriate therapies against these pathogens. The average CFS/FM patient has anywhere from one to seven pathogens that need eradication."

    http://www.mecfsforums.com/wiki/Hyp..._Symptoms_By_David_Berg_of_HEMEX_Laboratories


    I know people have used LMW Heparin with some success but what interests me the most are the natural alternatives, namely the fibrinolytic enzymes. Nattokinase and Lumbrokinase are two that are reference in the article next to Heparin:

    "The model of reduced blood flow from increased blood viscosity from a coagulation protein defect gives a scientific basis for chronic illness. It also gives a measurable or quantifiable aspect to testing a patient’s blood for these diseases. It is no longer “all in your head,” but rather in your “blood.” It’s not rocket science, but a simple, logical explanation for what’s going on in chronically ill patients.

    Besides heparin nattokinase and lumbrokinase help clear the blood of fibrin."


    There are also blends out there such as Neprinol. Anyone try anti-fibrins in this capacity before?
     
  2. minkeygirl

    minkeygirl But I Look So Good.

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    I have thick blood which may or may not be causing my brain fog. I've been using a double dose of Nattokinase, Vinpocetin, and aspirin and nothing has helped my fog.

    I'm getting retested next week which will determine if what I've been doing has helped with my thick blood (I have no problems with blood draws). If my blood is thin, then my fog is something else.
     
  3. Sushi

    Sushi Senior Member Albuquerque

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    This has been discussed quite a lot here. You can find the other threads with a Google Site Search but here is one.
     
    drob31 likes this.
  4. drob31

    drob31 Senior Member

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    How did you determine you had thick blood?

    Natto may not be enough, and you may also need lumbrokinase and some co-factors. I'm still researching it.
     

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