Julie Rehmeyer's 'Through the Shadowlands'
Writer Never Give Up talks about Julie Rehmeyer's new book "Through the Shadowlands: A Science Writer's Odyssey into an Illness Science Doesn't Understand" and shares an interview with Julie ...
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Ergonomics and ME/CFS: Have You Hurt Yourself Without Knowing It?

Discussion in 'Phoenix Rising Articles' started by Jody, Oct 21, 2014.

  1. Dr.Patient

    Dr.Patient There is no kinship like the one we share!

    Messages:
    505
    Likes:
    553
    USA
    I've learned one thing. Push or drag, don't lift.
     
    Gingergrrl, Jody and Valentijn like this.
  2. Valentijn

    Valentijn Senior Member

    Messages:
    14,281
    Likes:
    45,850
    And never forget: delegate :D
     
    Gingergrrl and Jody like this.
  3. Gingergrrl

    Gingergrrl Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,207
    Likes:
    29,203
    USA
    And never lift anything over your head. That is the absolute worst #1 trigger for me and why I can no longer use a hairdryer.
     
    Jody likes this.
  4. caledonia

    caledonia

    Messages:
    4,264
    Likes:
    3,316
    Cincinnati, OH, USA
    Ergonomics and preventing repetitive strain were important when I worked on the computer a lot as a graphic designer. They're even more important now. Somehow ME/CFS makes things worse.

    Besides having things set up right, I've learned a couple of quick stretches that help maintain things. It's pretty hard to describe the arm/wrist stretches in words, but it basically entails stretching them the opposite way you usually have them.

    The other is to do the yoga move called the Cobra to stretch that C shape out the other way. I do it a couple times a week (laying on the comfy bed, not the floor), otherwise I start getting lower back pain. I used to have to go to the chiro all the time, now doing the Cobra is all I need. It's saved me a bunch of money not to mention time and energy.
     
    Jody likes this.
  5. antares4141

    antares4141 Senior Member

    Messages:
    322
    Likes:
    410
    Truth or consequences, nm
    I have problems sitting at a computer in the typing position. A lot of it i suspect is from a dislocated hip back in 1989. Got two screws in the socket which was fractured and the ball had a fracture also on the non weight bearing part. So nothing had to be done with it. My left leg will sometimes get numb & fall asleep. The left check just hurts. And the wired thing is if I sit too long like this my hop will hurt when I walk on it. Feels like a bone on bone type pain but only after I sit too long. Low back problems too. From sitting or standing too long. Fortunately I got a tablet so this allows me to brake up my computer time between the laptop and the tablet. Just a small amount of time 10% is spent in the conventional desktop position. Some is spent on my knees at the desk (small table by bed) with the laptop. Some is spent with the laptop in my lap on the bed with a pile of blankets and pillows wadded up against the wall so I can sit that way for a while. When my back gets sore enough I lay the wad of blankets and pillows in the middle of my bed and lay on my stomach to try to undo all the compression from all the sitting. Laying that way is great but time consuming if you want any measurable decompression you need to apply traction to you back. I do this by wearing a robust belt loos enough that I can fit my hands partially insid my pants sorta on the front top part of my pelvis. I push down against my pelvis while at the same time trying to rotate the top part of it up. The belt holds my hands firmly against my hips giving me all the traction I need to put forty or fifty pounds of downward force on my hips. When my back hurts bad, the disks are compressed and I will here and feel a pop or two. I can't even begin to describe the amount of relieve this gives me. I would probably need pain killers if I didn't do this. The reason I arch the back by piling the blankets in the bed and laying on my stomach on top of them is the disk will almost slip back unto the uncompressed state by themselves. They tend to hang otherwise. That's also the reason I try to rotate the hips as I apply the downward force. I also do two isometric exercises that pull down on the disks in a way that eeseem to relive pressure. One lay on either side bring your knee up to your chest hold it with your hands and try to straighten it out. The other is to do the same but hold the ball of your foot and try to rotate your ankle. I had some really bad repetitive motion issues with mice and switched to a Logitech m570 trackball and love it. Dont use mice for anything anymore. It's great for in bed also cause you don't need a surface in order to opperate it. Also had some serious rotator cuf issues that were so bad if I were to pick up a lite object and hold it out away from my body the shoulder would pop and there would be mild sharp like pain. This all went away and I'm not sure if it's due solely to the trackball or in some part also to my switching to distiller warter. Been doing this for over two years now I guess and it seemed to help a lot. Water here in S. Central newmexico is very rich in calcium and probably some other minerals. I think it was poisoning me. I now sometimes drink gator aid just to make sure I am getting enough electrolytes.
     
    Jody likes this.
  6. garyfritz

    garyfritz Senior Member

    Messages:
    545
    Likes:
    278
    I have a stand-up desk but I found I can't stand very long. Walking is OK, but standing in one place is murder on my hips and knees.

    So I tried an experiment. I built a simple frame out of 2x2's that goes over my recliner and holds my 24" monitor above the recliner, facing down. I can lie down on the recliner and look up at the monitor. Then I used an old split keyboard I had, mounting each half of the keyboard on each armrest. I used a mouse but a touchpad would be even better.

    It looks like a Rube Goldberg setup but it really works very well.

    The recliner supports my entire body, making it very low-stress on all joints. One of those fancy "zero-gravity" chairs would be even better but the recliner works.
    Having the monitor directly over my face means I can look directly up at it, while I'm lying on my back, without any contortions.
    The split keyboard means I can have my arms and hands in a relaxed position at my sides. I mounted each half-keyboard at an angle, with the keys nearly vertical, so I didn't have to rotate or pronate my hands at all.

    Unfortunately I'm 6'4" and the recliner isn't comfortable for me to lie in for long periods. But if you have a good chair that supports you comfortably -- or possibly a bed -- this might be a great solution.
     
  7. Martial

    Martial Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,342
    Likes:
    1,182
    Ventura, CA

    Sounds kind of like the ergonomic chair/desk set ups I usually see online.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. garyfritz

    garyfritz Senior Member

    Messages:
    545
    Likes:
    278
    Very similar concept. But mine cost about ten bucks for lumber and bolts. A little cheaper than that fancy one you're showing there. :D
     

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page