The 12th Invest in ME Research Conference June, 2017, Part 2
MEMum presents the second article in a series of three about the recent 12th Invest In ME International Conference (IIMEC12) in London.
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EPO helpful in CFS patiënts

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Gijs, Dec 31, 2015.

  1. Gijs

    Gijs Senior Member

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  2. adreno

    adreno PR activist

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    I think it could certainly improve POTS, by increasing blood volume.
     
  3. Effi

    Effi Senior Member

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    is anything known about the side effects? I think I read somewhere they can be pretty brutal...
     
  4. Battery Muncher

    Battery Muncher Senior Member

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    Interesting. I haven't read the paper yet, but I always wondered what would happen if we started to use certain performance enhancing drugs that athletes use.
     
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  5. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    As @adreno pointed out, this may help a lot with blood volume. However if you take too much, or don't have a blood volume problem, it might slow blood circulation in the periphery or induce blood clots. Its high risk. However I wish there were more proper investigation of things like this, including clinical trials.

    For someone with proven decreased blood volume this would be something to discuss with their doctor.
     
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  6. msf

    msf Senior Member

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    I think Shoemaker has also mentioned this as a treatment for low VEGF.
     
  7. caledonia

    caledonia

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    EPO contains GLA which stimulates the production of prostaglandins (also known as eicosanoids). Eicosanoids are the body's natural painkillers and anti inflammatories.

    If you're not making eicosanoids at all, some GLA can be helpful.

    However, there are good eicosanoids and bad eicosanoids. Over time, too much GLA will tilt the body towards making bad eicosanoids and you will feel worse. You can take some pharmaceutical grade fish oil to tilt the body towards making good eicosanoids.

    Technically, you may not need much more GLA than what is in a bowl of oatmeal (a mg or two), instead of a 500mg pill or whatever EPO has.

    In general, many (most?) people are deficient in essential fatty acids and need some supplementation, as the body cannot make these substances, and our common modern food sources are either deficient or act counterproductively.
     
  8. adreno

    adreno PR activist

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    EPO = Erythropoietin, not Evening Primrose Oil @caledonia
     
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  9. caledonia

    caledonia

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    lol - that's what I get for not reading the link. Thanks for the heads up.
     
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  10. jepps

    jepps Senior Member

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    I took EPO in homoepathic form for iron deficiency, it increased my iron to a normal level.

    These supplements increase EPO:

    http://www.hammernutrition.com/knowledge/diet-for-increasing-your-natural-epo.280.html

     
  11. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Eicosanoids are also the body's natural inflammatories and pain inducers. GLA can induce extreme pain and even death in high enough doses in some people. Its how the body uses GLA that determines the outcome. There are a great many eicosanoids, and we keep discovering new ones. Its an entire class of hormones, with a huge range of properties, though all of them are very short lived, typically with a half life of only seconds. The body keeps making them from natural polyunsaturated fats. Its when a surge happens that they are most dangerous, which means higher dietary intake, especially if its a free fatty acid not a triglyceride, should be spread out and not taken all at once.

    GLA has repeatedly failed the test of time because its essentially impossible to regulate its effects reliably. Its not that it does not help, its that it can be like playing Russian Roulette.

    Prostaglandins are just one subset of eicosanoids.

    Also, its irrelevant to this topic, as @adreno said.

    PS. I have also made the same presumption about EPO. Its one of a few terms that has multiple meanings that come up in CFS and ME discussions a lot.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2015
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