Choline on the Brain? A Guide to Choline in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
http://phoenixrising.me/research-2/the-brain-in-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-mecfs/choline-on-the-brain-a-guide-to-choline-in-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-by-cort-johnson-aug-2005
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Endocrine alterations in HIV patients

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by pattismith, Feb 7, 2018.

  1. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,070
    Likes:
    1,605
    Endocrine alterations in HIV-infected patients
    Sujit Kumar Tripathy, Ritesh Kumar Agrawala,1 and Anoj Kumar Baliarsinha1

    2015:
    Abstract
    Aims and objectives:
    To study the frequency of thyroid, adrenal and gonadal dysfunction in newly diagnosed HIV-infected patients and to correlate them at different levels of CD4 cell counts.

    Materials and Methods:
    Forty-three HIV-positive cases were included in the study group. Cases were divided into three groups on the basis of CD4 cell count. Serum free T3, free T4, TSH, Cortisol, FSH, LH, testosterone and estradiol were estimated by the radioimmunoassay method. Hormone levels between cases were compared and their correlation with CD4 count was analyzed.

    Results:
    Prevalence of gonadal dysfunction (88.3%) was the most common endocrine dysfunction
    followed by thyroid (60.4%)
    and adrenal dysfunction (27.9%).
    Secondary hypogonadism (68.4%) was more common than primary (31.6%).
    Low T3 syndrome, that is, isolated low free T3, was the most common (25.6%) thyroid dysfunction followed by secondary hypothyroidism (16.2%) and subclinical hypothyroidism (11.6%).
    Adrenal excess (16.3%) was more common than adrenal insufficiency (11.6%).
    The difference in hormonal dysfunction between male and female was statistically insignificant (P > 0.05).
    27.9% of patients had multiple hormone deficiency.
    There was negligible or no correlation between CD4 count and serum hormone level.

    Conclusion:
    In our study, endocrine dysfunction was quite common among HIV-infected patients but there was no correlation between hormone levels and CD4 count. Endocrine dysfunctions and role of hormone replacement therapy in HIV-infected patient needs to be substantiated by large longitudinal study, so that it will help to reduce morbidity, improve quality of life.
     
    ukxmrv, heapsreal, BadBadBear and 2 others like this.
  2. heapsreal

    heapsreal iherb 10% discount code OPA989,

    Messages:
    8,916
    Likes:
    8,268
    australia (brisbane)
  3. heapsreal

    heapsreal iherb 10% discount code OPA989,

    Messages:
    8,916
    Likes:
    8,268
    australia (brisbane)
    I was looking for a study i had saved showing testosterone/anabolic steroids increase nk function in hiv, when i stumbled on this interesting link i had previously saved. I think it will be of interest and related to the original posting in this thread.
     
  4. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,070
    Likes:
    1,605
    ScottTriGuy and heapsreal like this.
  5. heapsreal

    heapsreal iherb 10% discount code OPA989,

    Messages:
    8,916
    Likes:
    8,268
    australia (brisbane)
    Probably but hard to signal one hormone out as it seems more of a team on its effects. I wonder if fixing this anabolic/catabolic state, if low t3 improves?

    It seems most cfsers have 1 or more hormones which are low. Good to see more research on all hormones corrected at once?
     
    ScottTriGuy likes this.
  6. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,070
    Likes:
    1,605
    T3 is a kind of bandmaster in your body. Once your T3 is low, all the other hormons will go low too: Cortisol, Pregnenolone sulfate, sexual hormons...
     
    heapsreal likes this.
  7. heapsreal

    heapsreal iherb 10% discount code OPA989,

    Messages:
    8,916
    Likes:
    8,268
    australia (brisbane)
    In the book 'stop the thyroid madness' , there is a group of people with low cortisol which is the cause of their low thyroid. They all seem to play off each other. I find the more i look into it the more it seems to be not known or understood fully. There also seems to be strong connections between hormones and neurotransmitters, electrolytes etc.

    I can understand why many drs arent interested in treating cfsers as it becomes very complex very fast when we start looking at hormones and add infections and the immune system. A few big rabbit holes to go down.
     
    pattismith likes this.

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page